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Re: [ineb] September 11

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  • rp
    What I wonder about is the effect of US taxpayers who contribute to the funding wars in foreign countries. One’s own actions can be for the benefit of all
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 10, 2002
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      What I wonder about is the effect of US taxpayers who
      contribute to the funding wars in foreign countries.
      One�s own actions can be for the benefit of all beings
      � but what is the effect if one�s finances are going
      to support war and killing. From my experience
      Americans are a generally hospitable and giving people
      � except toward people who look and act differently.
      The news media fans fears and I worry for a country
      full of afraid people armed with some of the most
      lethal weapons which have ever existed. The US body
      politic seems to be at a collision course with the
      rest of the world. The drumbeat for war in Iraq from
      some in Washington and Israel seems to be at odds from
      others of the elite and powerful in the world. Who
      knows how many of the powerless of the world will die
      in this new conflict.

      I am heartened by the resistance � but note that those
      who do run the risk of jail and loss of their
      livelihood.

      Where are the socially engaged Buddhists in all this?


      Richard

      --- Ken and Visakha Kawasaki <brelief@...>
      wrote:
      > Yesterday we participated in a memorial service for
      > 9 -11 representing the
      > Buddhist tradition.
      >
      > Ken read the following:
      >
      > The Buddha taught:
      > The worse of the two is he who, when abused,
      > retaliates
      > One who does not retaliate wins a battle hard to
      > win.
      >
      > In Buddhism, there are four sublime states of mind
      > which are the ideal way
      > of conduct towards all living beings, friends,
      > strangers and enemies
      > alike. These states of mind provide the answer to
      > all situations arising
      > from social contact. They are the great removers of
      > tension, the great
      > peace-makers in social conflict. They level social
      > barriers, build
      > harmonious communities, and promote human
      > brotherhood against the forces of
      > egotism and hatred.
      >
      > These four are loving-kindness (metta), compassion
      > (karuna), sympathetic
      > joy (mudita), and equanimity (upekkha).
      >
      > Metta: Loving kindness embraces all beings, knowing
      > well that we all are
      > fellow wayfarers through this round of
      > existence�that we all are overcome
      > by the same law of suffering. Loving-kindness is
      > successful when it makes
      > ill-will subside, and it fails when it gives rise to
      > selfish affection.
      >
      > Karuna: Compassion reconciles us to our own destiny
      > by showing us the life
      > of others, often much harder than our own.
      > Compassion prompts us to work
      > to remove other�s suffering. Compassion succeeds
      > when thoughts of cruelty
      > subside, and it fails when it gives rise to sorrow.
      >
      > Mudita:Sympathetic joy adds to our lives, enabling
      > us to gain in joy by
      > sharing the happiness of others as if it were our
      > own. It frees us from
      > envy. Sympathetic joy is successful when aversion
      > subsides, and it fails
      > when it gives rise to trivial merriment.
      >
      > Upekkha: Equanimity is a perfect, unshakable balance
      > of mind, rooted in
      > insight. Life continually moves between contrasts:
      > success and failure,
      > loss and gain, honor and blame. Our hearts respond
      > to all this with
      > happiness and sorrow, disappointment and
      > satisfaction, hope and
      > fear. These waves of emotion carry us up and fling
      > us down. How can we
      > expect to get a footing on the crest of the waves?
      > How can we erect the
      > building of our lives in the midst of this ever
      > restless ocean of
      > existence, if not on the Island of Equanimity?
      >
      > To develop these four sublime states, we must train
      > ourselves by daily
      > practice of meditation:
      >
      > Metta (Loving-kindness): May all beings without
      > exception be happy. May
      > none wish harm to another.
      >
      > Karuna (Compassion): May all those who are
      > suffering, afraid, in pain,
      > or in trouble find relief. May they be happy.
      >
      > Mudita (Sympathetic joy): May all those who
      > are well, successful,
      > healthy, and prosperous maintain themselves happily.
      >
      > Upekkha (Equanimity): All beings are born of their
      > kamma, heirs of their
      > kamma, and abide supported by their kamma. And of
      > all that they do, of
      > that they shall be the heirs.
      >
      > Develop the quiet even state of mind,
      > when praised by some, condemned by others,
      > free the mind from hate and pride
      > and gently go your way in peace.
      >
      >
      > Please visit our newly established websites!
      >
      > Buddhist Relief Mission <http://www.brelief.org>
      > Burmese Relief Center--USA <http://www.brelief.net>
      > Relief Notes 2002
      > <http://home.earthlink.net/~brelief/>
      >
      >
      >


      __________________________________________________
      Yahoo! - We Remember
      9-11: A tribute to the more than 3,000 lives lost
      http://dir.remember.yahoo.com/tribute
    • Ken and Visakha Kawasaki
      Yesterday we participated in a memorial service for 9 -11 representing the Buddhist tradition. Ken read the following: The Buddha taught: The worse of the two
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 10, 2002
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        Yesterday we participated in a memorial service for 9 -11 representing the
        Buddhist tradition.

        Ken read the following:

        The Buddha taught:
        The worse of the two is he who, when abused, retaliates
        One who does not retaliate wins a battle hard to win.

        In Buddhism, there are four sublime states of mind which are the ideal way
        of conduct towards all living beings, friends, strangers and enemies
        alike. These states of mind provide the answer to all situations arising
        from social contact. They are the great removers of tension, the great
        peace-makers in social conflict. They level social barriers, build
        harmonious communities, and promote human brotherhood against the forces of
        egotism and hatred.

        These four are loving-kindness (metta), compassion (karuna), sympathetic
        joy (mudita), and equanimity (upekkha).

        Metta: Loving kindness embraces all beings, knowing well that we all are
        fellow wayfarers through this round of existence–that we all are overcome
        by the same law of suffering. Loving-kindness is successful when it makes
        ill-will subside, and it fails when it gives rise to selfish affection.

        Karuna: Compassion reconciles us to our own destiny by showing us the life
        of others, often much harder than our own. Compassion prompts us to work
        to remove other’s suffering. Compassion succeeds when thoughts of cruelty
        subside, and it fails when it gives rise to sorrow.

        Mudita:Sympathetic joy adds to our lives, enabling us to gain in joy by
        sharing the happiness of others as if it were our own. It frees us from
        envy. Sympathetic joy is successful when aversion subsides, and it fails
        when it gives rise to trivial merriment.

        Upekkha: Equanimity is a perfect, unshakable balance of mind, rooted in
        insight. Life continually moves between contrasts: success and failure,
        loss and gain, honor and blame. Our hearts respond to all this with
        happiness and sorrow, disappointment and satisfaction, hope and
        fear. These waves of emotion carry us up and fling us down. How can we
        expect to get a footing on the crest of the waves? How can we erect the
        building of our lives in the midst of this ever restless ocean of
        existence, if not on the Island of Equanimity?

        To develop these four sublime states, we must train ourselves by daily
        practice of meditation:

        Metta (Loving-kindness): May all beings without exception be happy. May
        none wish harm to another.

        Karuna (Compassion): May all those who are suffering, afraid, in pain,
        or in trouble find relief. May they be happy.

        Mudita (Sympathetic joy): May all those who are well, successful,
        healthy, and prosperous maintain themselves happily.

        Upekkha (Equanimity): All beings are born of their kamma, heirs of their
        kamma, and abide supported by their kamma. And of all that they do, of
        that they shall be the heirs.

        Develop the quiet even state of mind,
        when praised by some, condemned by others,
        free the mind from hate and pride
        and gently go your way in peace.


        Please visit our newly established websites!

        Buddhist Relief Mission <http://www.brelief.org>
        Burmese Relief Center--USA <http://www.brelief.net>
        Relief Notes 2002 <http://home.earthlink.net/~brelief/>
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