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Study from home from one of the most experienced meditators

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  • Sasha1
    Dear Dharma Friends, Donal Creedon, the Buddhist teacher who is considered one of the most experienced meditators of the West, now offers a course via
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 7, 2000
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      Dear Dharma Friends,

      Donal Creedon, the Buddhist teacher who is considered one of the most experienced meditators of the West, now offers a course via Internet.

      Donal will conduct his course, Essence of Meditation, from Moscow, Russia, where he currently supervises a Buddhist center.  You can participate in this course from any location in the world. All you need is a regular PC, access to the web and software, which you receive free after registration. This will allow you listen to the teaching and speak to Donal without living home!   

      Donal Creedon is well recognized for his unique experience and ability to explain dharma in terms Westerners can relate to. Originally from Ireland, he spent 12 years in retreat under the guidance of Akong Rinpoche and Lama Yeshe Losal. For a few years Donal was Retreat Leader with the responsibilities of teaching, directing and managing a group of men in long-term solitude. 

      The methods Donal teaches in his course can be used by nearly anyone regardless of background or religious beliefs. This teaching will be beneficial for beginners as well as advanced practitioners. 

      To register or receive more information, check www.agabaga.com.  

      Remember: evolution is not necessarily collective,

      Agabaga.

    • John Thomas
      ... Why is this not spam?
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 7, 2000
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        At 4:14 PM -0700 7/7/00, Sasha1 wrote:
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        >From: "Sasha1" <sasha1@...>
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        >Date: Fri, 7 Jul 2000 16:14:44 -0700
        >Reply-To: "Sasha1" <sasha1@...>
        >Subject: [ineb] Study from home from one of the most experienced meditators
        >Status: RO
        >
        >
        >
        >Dear Dharma Friends,
        >
        >Donal Creedon, the Buddhist teacher who is considered one of the
        >most experienced meditators of the West, now offers a course via
        >Internet.
        >
        >Donal will conduct his course, Essence of Meditation, from Moscow,
        >Russia, where he currently supervises a Buddhist center. You can
        >participate in this course from any location in the world. All you
        >need is a regular PC, access to the web and software, which you
        >receive free after registration. This will allow you listen to the
        >teaching and speak to Donal without living home!
        >
        >Donal Creedon is well recognized for his unique experience and
        >ability to explain dharma in terms Westerners can relate to.
        >Originally from Ireland, he spent 12 years in retreat under the
        >guidance of Akong Rinpoche and Lama Yeshe Losal. For a few years
        >Donal was Retreat Leader with the responsibilities of teaching,
        >directing and managing a group of men in long-term solitude.
        >
        >The methods Donal teaches in his course can be used by nearly anyone
        >regardless of background or religious beliefs. This teaching will be
        >beneficial for beginners as well as advanced practitioners.
        >
        >To register or receive more information, check
        ><http://www.agabaga.com/>www.agabaga.com.
        >
        >Remember: evolution is not necessarily collective,
        >
        >Agabaga.
        >
        >
        ><http://click.egroups.com/1/6231/12/_/10122/_/963011665/>
        Why is this not spam?
      • Jonathan Watts
        Keeper of the Flame Thich Quang Do is the conscience of Buddhism in Vietnam -- and a Nobel Prize prospect By KEN STIER Ho Chi Minh City Asia Week, June 30,
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 9, 2000
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          Keeper of the Flame Thich Quang Do is the conscience of Buddhism in Vietnam
          -- and a Nobel Prize prospect

          By KEN STIER Ho Chi Minh City

          Asia Week, June 30, 2000 VOL. 29 NO. 25

          In a better Vietnam, Thich Quang Do would have his own television
          program, like his Buddhist counterparts in Thailand or Muslim clerics in
          Malaysia. A noted scholar, Do is articulate and charismatic, with an
          infectious sense of humor; he could easily hold his own against the vapid
          productions of state TV. Not only does the monk offer solace to a
          systematically de-spiritualized society, he can also recount the
          still-secret story of repression against Vietnamese Buddhism over the past
          half-century -- all from personal experience. North American and European
          politicians have nominated him for this year's Nobel Peace Prize.
          Yet in today's Vietnam, Do, 72, is clearly unfit for prime time.
          The problem: He's a bit of an anti-communist. And no wonder. Do's spiritual
          master was executed before his eyes by communist forces in 1945. "They said
          he was a traitor," he recalls. After a seven-year sojourn in India, Sri
          Lanka and other parts of Buddhist Asia, Do returned to Saigon, where he
          taught Buddhist philosophy in the 1960s and 1970s. Since the Communist
          victory of 1975, he has spent nearly 15 years in jail or under "pagoda
          arrest." His offense: resisting the destruction of his Unified Buddhist
          Church of Vietnam, which used to represent virtually all Buddhist clergy
          (20,000) and lay followers in southern Vietnam. The UBCV was replaced by a
          new "patriotic" Vietnam Buddhist Church, controlled by the Communist Party.
          Since arriving in Vietnam two millennia ago, Buddhism has always
          remained outside government control -- supporting the state in times of
          need, more often checking its powers when it became corrupt or too
          authoritarian. The religion was regularly repressed by feudal, colonial,
          militarist and communist regimes. Personal experience convinces Do that the
          Communists have been the worst. "I have lived under French colonial rule,
          under [Emperor] Bao Dai, under [all the South Vietnamese regimes]," he
          says. "But none compare with the Communist dictatorship."
          After expelling the French from northern Vietnam in 1954, Do
          charges, the Communists did their best to exterminate religion, especially
          Buddhism. All practices were banned and pagodas were confiscated or
          destroyed. Younger monks were sent to work brigades. Even today, there are
          few monks -- or any palpable sense of spirituality -in the north.
          After 1975, a similar plan was begun in the South but it quickly
          ran into trouble. Forged through resistance to the repression of Catholic
          president Ngo Diem Diem, the southern Buddhists were better organized and
          more resolute than their northern brethren. In their first major act of
          protest, in late 1975, the 12 monks and nuns in a monastery collectively
          burned themselves. By April 1977, Do was in jail and by 1981, he and his
          superior, UBCV patriarch Thich Huyen Quang, were exiled to remote pagodas
          without undergoing trials.
          International pressure helped free Do in September 1998, after a
          three-year prison stint for organizing an illegal charity for flood
          victims. Now settled in the Thanh Minh Zen Monastery in Ho Chi Minh City,
          Do is still not entirely free. His phone is tapped, and police shadow him
          whenever he goes outside. Novices are not allowed to live with Do and he is
          barred from teaching. "They want to isolate me as if I were a contagious
          disease," he says, laughing. When police prevented a United Nations
          religion official from visiting the monastery, Do thanked them for
          demonstrating Vietnam's lack of religious freedom more convincingly than
          anything he could have said or done.
          Despite the constraints, Do, the UBCV's No. 2 official, writes
          letters to Hanoi which are circulated globally through the church's office
          in Paris, the International Buddhist Information Bureau (IBIB). Some
          trickle back into Vietnam, through press reports on the Internet or in
          Western-funded Vietnamese-language radio broadcasts. Do hit a raw nerve
          when he urged aid givers in the West to link continued assistance to
          Vietnam with improved human rights. The government, increasingly dependent
          on international largess as foreign investors stay away, was furious. Do
          was interrogated for hours and threatened with violating national security
          -- a crime punishable by death. Though the monk admits to some concern
          about death by a staged accident, more time behind bars he can contemplate
          with an equanimity that exasperates authorities.
          Yet Do's prison days seem to be over. "He is a thorn in their side
          but they don't regard him as a major threat," says a diplomat in Hanoi.
          "Otherwise they would completely isolate him. Also, they can't clamp down
          on him without serious ramifications for their image aboard." That
          political umbrella keeps getting bigger, even though for Do it is an
          ambivalent honor to be better known abroad than at home. His latest
          nomination for the Nobel Peace Prize is his third. And when a U.S.
          congressman visited Do recently, Hanoi slammed the move as an "unfriendly
          act."
          The government tries to dismiss Do, and the few dozen other monks
          openly affiliated with the UBCV, as irrelevant because their church does
          not officially exist. "Do goes against the trend of unification and state
          law, as well as the regulations of the Vietnam Buddhist Church, so he is
          involved in illegal activities," says Le Dinh Hiet, a religion official.
          Hanoi claims the loyalty of the Buddhist clergy, whose numbers are now
          estimated at 28,000. Do. however, insists that most monks secretly back the
          UBCV, though they lack the courage to suffer pariah status.
          Thich Nhat Hanh, who left his homeland after the war, is perhaps
          the best known Buddhist in the West after the Dalai Lama. He says of his
          compatriot: "The authorities have condemned and tried Do as a criminal who
          damaged national security. [But] deep down, they still respect Do as an
          exceptional personality, whose ethics and bravery set an example for his
          contemporaries. That is the envy of much of the [political] leadership."
          The ongoing struggle between Vietnam's official Buddhist hierarchy
          and the UBCV centers on the qualitative functioning of Buddhism, long an
          indivisible part of life in the country. In a letter smuggled from his
          island pagoda prison, patriarch Quang, 82, says that "after 50 years of
          devastating war waged in the name of conflicting, imported ideologies,
          religious movements alone possess an unparalleled capacity to temper
          hatreds, defuse conflict and restore moral values in a society plunged in a
          spiritual and moral crisis. As such, they have a vital role to play in the
          reconstruction of the country."
          Party leaders have preferred to rebuild on their own, though in
          recent years they have loosened restrictions on worship and tried to revive
          folk rites and festivals. The results, though, are perverse, according to
          critics. "The party is using state-sponsored religious bodies to confine
          religious activity to prayers, meditation and fasting," says Vo Van Ai, who
          runs the IBIB Paris office. "That reduces religion to quasi-superstitious
          rites."
          Yet Hanoi is slowly acknowledging that its bureaucracy is
          overwhelmed by an explosion of social ills. Do offers motivated followers
          who can do more social work -- if the church's confiscated network of
          hospitals, schools, orphanages, social centers and a university is returned
          to it. In the more progressive south, officials are quietly experimenting
          with such assistance, though under state auspices. "For 25 years we have
          suffered continuous repression," says Do. "But we believe firmly that we
          will get freedom completely, sooner or later." Then he would be able to
          address his compatriots on prime time.



          *******************************
          Jonathan Watts
          Togenji Terrace B
          Yamanouchi 868
          Kamakura 247-0062
          Tel/Fax: 81-467-44-9875
          E-mail: jonaomi@...
          VISIT THINK SANGHA AT:
          http://www.bpf.org/think.html
          *******************************
        • Santikaro Bhikkhu
          ... ### SEEMS LIKE SPAM TO ME. ADVERTISING TEACHERS IS SURELY NOT THE PURPOSE OF THIS LIST. THERE WAS NO MENTION OF THIS GUY BEING AN ENGAGED BUDDHIST. Be cool
          Message 4 of 4 , Jul 9, 2000
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            John Thomas wrote:
            At 4:14 PM -0700 7/7/00, Sasha1 wrote:

            >Donal Creedon, the Buddhist teacher who is considered one of the >most experienced meditators of the West, now offers a course via >Internet.
            >
            >Agabaga.
            >
            ><http://click.egroups.com/1/6231/12/_/10122/_/963011665/>

               Why is this not spam?
             
            ### SEEMS LIKE SPAM TO ME. ADVERTISING TEACHERS IS SURELY NOT THE PURPOSE OF THIS LIST. THERE WAS NO MENTION OF THIS GUY BEING AN ENGAGED BUDDHIST.

                                   Be cool ;-)

               ** Dhamma  **  Metta  **  Santi **

                              Santikaro Bhikkhu
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