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Pew Survey Reveals Huge Partisan Gap in National Security Attitudes among Americans

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  • John MacDougall
    Go to http://pewresearch.org/trends/ for free copies of the Trends 2005 book. Each chapter is available separately in pdf format. -- Pew Research Center for
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 24, 2005
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      Go to http://pewresearch.org/trends/ for free copies of the Trends 2005 book.
      Each chapter is available separately in pdf format.


      --


      Pew Research Center for People and the Press
      Trends 2005
      A new survey of the core values of the American public has found that beliefs about national
      security are now twice as important as economic, social or religious values in shaping people's
      partisan identification. Five year ago, these national security attitudes barely registered as a
      correlate of partisanship.

      Pew polling found that differing views about the war in Iraq and about the best way to combat
      terrorism in the post-September 11 era are principally responsible for creating a huge 44 percentage
      point partisan gap in national security attitudes. Republicans are now more hawkish and Democrats
      more dovish than at any time in the past two decades.

      The survey also found that partisan gaps in basic attitudes toward government - a key point of
      difference between Democrats and Republicans for generations - have narrowed, a change driven
      largely by a growing pro-government sentiment among traditionally anti-government Republicans.

      The findings from a survey of 2,000 Americans are presented in "Trends 2005," a reference book
      published today by the Pew Research Center. The book also examines current developments and
      long-term trends in politics, religion and public life; the media; the growing Hispanic population;
      state policy; and national and global public opinion.

      It is the first publication of the Pew Research Center, an independent, non-partisan, Washington,
      DC-based "fact tank" that houses six previously separate information projects, including the Pew
      Research Center for the People & the Press.

      For information about the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press and its latest surveys,
      continue to use our website at http://www.people-press.org .

      For information about the Pew Research Center, including the book Trends 2005, visit
      http://www.pewresearch.org .
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