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SAT skills or Human skills

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  • Robert Swanson
    In the Sudbury model, kids use life to discover learning. That is so different than the abstraction and coercion of public schools which limits expression of
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 3, 2001
      In the Sudbury model, kids use life to discover learning. That is so
      different than the abstraction and coercion of public schools which limits
      expression of intelligence.

      Life learning is three things: analytical, creative, practical.
      Abstract-analytical is left-brained intellect. Creative is the neocortex
      guided by joy in the midbrain. Practical is the lower brain using its pure
      experience of doing, mostly learned by age four.
      robert
      ---------------------------------

      http://www.nytimes.com/2001/04/03/health/03STER.html?pagewanted=all
      Schools make no effort to teach them in the ways they find easiest to learn.
      They quickly get the message that their skills are not valued, and start
      acting accordingly ‹ and ultimately, Dr. Sternberg says, society is deprived
      of their contributions.

      Nor does the narrow view of skills promoted by the tests, Dr. Sternberg
      believes, take into account the fact that "abilities are not something
      you're born with, that are etched in invisible ink on your forehead and
      cannot be changed."

      Rather, he contends, research has demonstrated that abilities are modifiable
      both in respect to level and kind.

      "You can develop new kinds of abilities that you might not even have known
      you had," Dr. Sternberg said.

      ...Dr. Sternberg's own theory identifies a trio of mental abilities:
      analytical intelligence (the type measured by I.Q. tests), creative
      intelligence and practical intelligence.

      All three types of abilities, he said, are often required to succeed in
      life.

      "You need creative intelligence to come up with an idea, analytical
      intelligence to know if it's a good idea and practical intelligence to sell
      it," he said.

      But people who have superior practical and creative skills often do not
      perform well on tests that reflect only analytical abilities, and thus are
      deprived of educational opportunities, Dr. Sternberg says. A disadvantaged
      teenager with strong leadership skills and "street smarts" well above
      average, for example, might perform poorly on the SAT. Or a "creative
      learner," who excels at open-ended assignments ‹ Dr. Sternberg was such a
      student himself, he said ‹ might be flummoxed by multiple-choice tests or
      memory tasks, ruining the chances for admission to a top-flight college.

      Adding measures that tap creative and practical faculties to standard test
      batteries, the psychologist argues, could benefit everyone in the long run,
      and may even eliminate the need for what he sees as more flat- footed
      methods of broadening admissions policies, like affirmative action.

      And, Dr. Sternberg said, his research suggests that when teachers balance
      analytical exercises ‹ which often dominate class time ‹ with creative and
      practical tasks, students' overall performance improves.
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