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  • Garnet1654@aol.com
    This is a summary, to read the articles in their entirety visit: Canku Ota (Many Paths) http://www.turtletrack.org An
    Message 1 of 10 , Jun 1, 2001
      This is a summary, to read the articles in their entirety visit:

      Canku Ota (Many Paths)
      <A HREF="http://www.turtletrack.org">http://www.turtletrack.org</A>
      An Online Newsletter Celebrating Native America
      June 2, 2001 - Issue 37

      "Cama-i"
      Yup'ik
      "Hello, Greetings (Exclamation)
      (usually accompanied by handshake and used after not seeing for a long time
      or meeting for the first time)

      "WUKOUYIS"
      Major Planting Moon
      Hopi

      "When your brother falls behind you don't leave him there. Wait for him to
      catch up."
      Albert Ward Mic Mac Elder

      We Salute
      Zacharias Kunuk

      Filmmaker Zacharias Kunuk returned to a hero's welcome in Nunavut.

      Kunuk won the Golden Camera award last weekend for first-time directors at
      the international Cannes Film Festival in France.

      He won the award for the film: "Atanarjuat The Fast Runner".

      Artist:
      Duane Maktima

      Duane Maktima is a contemporary jewelry designer of Laguna Pueblo and Hopi
      descent. According to Duane's grandfather, the name 'Maktima' means
      "searching for eagles." His designs reflect his personal beliefs about the
      forward movement of Native Americans. Although traditional values and myths
      of the Southwestern Pueblo People influence the "Maktima style," other
      nuances are evident. As he says, "Strong influences in my work include
      Southwest Deco design, and - because I am part of a broader picture -
      Scandinavian design as well."

      Echoes in the Electronic Wind
      By Frank Odasz
      Despite centuries of hardship and mistreatment, over 700 Native American
      tribes today continue their determined tradition of sustainable community and
      culture.

      The echoes of the Native American history of building strong sustainable
      communities, coupled with the newfound power of the Internet, suggests the
      inevitability that model self-empowered Native American communities will soon
      appear.

      The Time Has Now Come For the True History of the People of the First Nations
      of this Land to Be Told
      by Suzanne Westerly, correspondent

      For the last two years, Floyd Red Crow Westerman (Dakota Sioux), American
      Indian actor, singer, songwriter, and longtime activist and his crew, have
      been researching, and documenting on film, the true history of the United
      States, as told by American Indians themselves.

      Inuit Women Seek Parka Copyright

      The national association of Inuit women is trying to prevent southern
      manufacturers from copying traditional Inuit designs. Pauktuutit says it made
      big progress at a weekend conference to protect the amauti, or parka worn by
      women.

      Delegates at the workshop want to make sure the amauti doesn't go the way of
      the kayak, copied and mass-marketed by southern companies without giving
      credit - or profit - to the Inuit who designed it.

      The group spent the weekend discussing the different laws that protect
      intellectual property such as copyright, trademark and industrial design.

      A Lifetime Pledge
      Diné College graduates 134 students

      It was a simple statement but also a pledge that will last a lifetime.

      Diné College's graduation commencement speaker Richard Williams
      (Lakota/Cheyenne) asked the graduates to repeat in unison: "I do what I do
      because in my heart, I do it for my people."

      Prep School in New Mexico Combines Academics, Indian View

      A river runs through the 1,600-acre campus of the Native American Preparatory
      School -- the first school of its kind -- near Santa Fe, N.M. Along the
      bluffs and arroyos, students study botany, geology and biology firsthand.

      But this is no laid-back, alternative school.

      Keeping our Language Alive:
      Hawaiian Success Story

      Yellowknife - It's not too late to preserve aboriginal languages in the
      North, says a Hawaiian language advocate whose job is breathing life into a
      nearly extinct island language.

      Namaka Rawlins runs a grassroots education movement that got started nearly
      20 years ago, but only recently began to see results of an awakened
      aboriginal heritage in Hawaii.

      Lummis Place Premium on Recovering Language

      How do you learn words your family was forbidden to speak?

      How do you know how to make something you've never seen?

      Ask Dave Wilson, who is leading Lummi school's effort to build a dugout cedar
      canoe, the kind no one has seen at Lummi for 80 years.

      Cherokee Nation Welcomes IRS … Really!

      TAHLEQUAH, OK - Few people welcome representatives of the Internal Revenue
      Service with open arms. And it's hard to imagine that it will be a good day
      when an IRS employee backs up a truck at your warehouse. But strange as it
      may seem, the Cherokee Nation was more than happy to see that IRS employee,
      James Hellams, this past week.

      "I'm the guy from the IRS that people like to see," he said.

      Kattajjatiit - from Generation to Generation

      IQALUIT — In the beginning was the sound now emanating from Minnie
      Allakariallak's throat.

      Huh-mmh, huh-mmh, huh-mmh, she throat-sings as her tiny, pretty face crinkles
      with mirth.

      Seemingly oblivious to her surroundings, the bliss of throat-singing music
      Minnie's known for more than 80 years shines in her smile displaying small,
      perfect teeth.

      Schooling has Lasted Lifetime for
      Lummi Cultural Teacher

      Point's long relationship with higher education began by accident.

      "I hadn't planned on going to college," said Point, who teaches Lummi art,
      history and language at Lummi Tribal School. "It was just a thing that
      happened."

      Lummis Capture School Dream

      In a stuffy, cramped classroom, Lummi elder Jack Cagey patiently strikes his
      drum.

      Desks are pushed against walls. In the middle, third-graders in socks take
      careful, abbreviated dance steps.

      "Let's see if you guys remember the eagle dance," Cagey says. "Don't hit each
      other with your wings, now."

      Medicine Wheel Teaches Spiritual Harmony

      Tracy Chatfield breaks a piece off a stalk of white sage, lights it with a
      match and lets it waft in the air. The room soon fills with a smoky, spicy
      scent and all present are purified ... centered ... in harmony with life.

      "I hate the idea of culture under glass," Chatfield, a program assistant with
      Bay City's Title IX Indian Education Program, said last week.

      Learning on the Land

      IQALUIT — Grade 7 student Karen Flaherty says it made her feel good to turn
      the tables and teach her teachers.

      The Iqaluit 12-year-old recently went on an overnight land trip with 11 of
      her Aqsarniit Middle School classmates at the cadet cabin, about an
      hour-and-a-half by snowmobile from Iqaluit.

      "(The teachers) are not from here," she said. "We can teach them stuff that
      they didn't know before."

      Seniors Helping Seniors in Shiprock

      SHIPROCK - Two days before the Shiprock Class of 2001 graduates, they weren't
      thinking about what they would do this summer. They were thinking about
      helping their elders at the Shiprock Senior Center.

      The senior class at Shiprock High School donated $8,000 to the Shiprock
      Senior Center.

      Tribe Fighting Diabetes

      WISCONSIN RAPIDS The Ho-Chunk Nation is stepping up efforts to prevent
      diabetes by arming itself with tips on good nutrition, expanded activity
      programs and a wealth of community support.

      Our focus in this is to make people more healthy and prevent the onset of
      diabetes and complications associated with the disease, Pam Reimer, community
      health nurse for the tribes Health and Social Services office in Nekoosa.

      Salmon in our Heritage

      Viola Anglin knew the salmon had returned to the Lemhi River when she saw
      their tails had swept the moss off the base of the old Mahaffey Bridge.

      The salmon runs used to attract hundreds of anglers who crowded into Anglin's
      Tendoy Store, 20 miles east of Salmon, Idaho, where both the city and the
      river are named for the fish. The fishermen accounted for most of the profit
      margin of the store that Anglin, 81, has owned since 1948.

      "We had so many friends from all over the countryside," Anglin said. "It's
      been gone for a long, long time."

      Reuniting the Tribal Nations

      AMERICAN FALLS, ID — When the Shoshone-Bannock Olympic Committee welcomes
      members of the Suquamish tribes from a long canoe trip from the Pacific Ocean
      in August, it will be the start of something very important, director Garth
      Towersap said.

      The committee is planning a Reunion of Nations, where tribes come together to
      share their cultures and to discuss ways they can work together. The
      Suquamish tribe will paddle canoes from their homes near the Pacific Ocean to
      the Fort Hall bottoms in August.

      About This Issue's Greeting - "Cama-i"

      There are more Yupik people than any other Alaskan Native people. About
      20,000 live in Alaska today. Most Yupik people live in small villages along
      the Bering Sea and the lower Yukon and Kuskokwim Rivers. Many Yupik people
      still speak the Yupik language. There are many dialects in the language. The
      same word can have different meanings between villages, but the most common
      language is called Central Yupik. About 1/3 of the Yupik children learn
      Central Yupik as their first language. Local radio stations even broadcast in
      the language.

      This Date In History
      Recipe: Popcorn Treats
      Story: The Jaguar and The Deer
      What is this: Jaguar
      Project: The Beading Series - Part 7
      This Issue's Web sites

      Opportunities

      "OPPORTUNITIES" is from sources distributed nationally and includes
      scholarships, grants, internships, fellowships, and career opportunities as
      well as announcements for conferences, workshops and symposia.

      Canku Ota is a free Newsletter celebrating Native America, its traditions and
      accomplishments . We do not provide subscriber or visitor names to anyone.
      Some articles presented in Canku Ota may contain copyright material. We have
      received appropriate permissions for republishing any articles. Material
      appearing here is distributed without profit or monetary gain to those who
      have expressed an interest. This is in accordance with Title 17 U.S.C.
      section 107.

      Canku Ota is a copyright © 2000, 2001 of Vicki Lockard and Paul Barry.
      The "Canku Ota - A Newsletter Celebrating Native America" web site and its
      design is the Copyright © 1999, 2000, 2001 of Paul C. Barry.
      All Rights Reserved.
    • Garnet1654@aol.com
      This is a summary, to read the articles in their entirety visit: Canku Ota (Many Paths) http://www.turtletrack.org An
      Message 2 of 10 , Jun 15, 2001
        This is a summary, to read the articles in their entirety visit:
        <A HREF="http://www.turtletrack.org">
        Canku Ota (Many Paths)</A>
        http://www.turtletrack.org
        An Online Newsletter Celebrating Native America
        June 16, 2001 - Issue 38

        "Aquay!"
        Mohegan
        "Greetings (Exclamation)"

        "Msheke'kesis"
        Month of the Turtle
        Potawatomi

        "When your brother falls behind you don't leave him there. Wait for him to
        catch up."
        Albert Ward Mic Mac Elder

        We Salute
        Henry Rodriguez

        LA JOLLA INDIAN RESERVATION - While walking the 4-acre plot of family land at
        the foot of Palomar Mountain, Henry Rodriguez mused over the honorary degree
        he will receive Sunday from Cal State San Marcos.

        The 82-year-old Rodriguez is being recognized for his lifelong work
        advocating for better education, water rights and the preservation of the
        American Indian culture.

        News Flash!!!
        This issue of "Canku Ota" debuts a new feature. We're adding maps to our
        articles, so that you can see where the many paths of our People are.
        Additionally, we've provided these two maps of North America and a coloring
        book picture for you to print. We hope that this new feature is helpful.

        Artist:
        Dana Tiger

        Dana Tiger follows her father's footsteps, feels his presence near her, lives
        his legacy.

        When she reached the crossroads of despair and survival more than 16 years
        ago, she said, his spirit reached her, reminded her of her heritage and
        picked her back up.

        Rivers Run Through It
        By Doreen Yellow Bird Grand Forks Herald

        I am fascinated by rivers. They seem to have their own personalities -- their
        own spirits. Perhaps my fascination comes from deep inside -- something I
        inherited from an ancestor -- a grandmother who lived near the Missouri or
        Platte river.

        Young Indian Pupils Gear Up for Success in ASU Program

        The elementary school students from the Gila River Indian Community sprawled
        on the floor of the Arizona State University East campus' Academic Center,
        working on 100-piece jigsaw puzzles.

        Rules dictated that several students remain silent and others use only one
        hand to assemble parts, helping the youngsters understand the value of
        teamwork.

        Eel Ground Students Take Award for Web Site Design

        EEL GROUND, NB - A lot of New Brunswickers could not find Eel Ground First
        Nation without asking directions.

        But, 16 students put this Mi'kmaq community on the Northwest Miramichi River
        on the map in cyberspace when they placed third in the world in a Web site
        design contest.

        On Ortiz, Threading the Americas

        TUCSON, Ariz. - Packing now for Canada where he will teach Native language
        and Aboriginal studies at the University of Toronto, Simon Ortiz holds in his
        hand the latest book to include his essays.

        The brightly-colored children's book, "Questions & Swords, Folktales of the
        Zapatista Revolution," as told by Subcomandante Marcos, has just arrived with
        Ortiz' name alongside Marcos' on the cover.

        Graduates Earn Degrees from Reservation Campuses

        MUCKLESHOOT RESERVATION, WA -- Wilma Cabanas remembers long ago watching and
        crying as Auburn High School graduates went by her East Main residence to
        their commencement ceremony at the school.She never made it to Auburn High
        School. A mother at 15, she liked school but had other obligations.

        Summer Camp Aims to Preserve Language

        WHITEHORSE, YUKON - A Yukon First Nation based in Whitehorse is hoping a camp
        this summer will be the first step in saving its language.

        A Southern Tutchone immersion camp is set to begin next month.

        Oneidas Revive Tribal Language

        ONEIDA, WI — A group of eighth-graders in Gail Danforth’s Oneida cultural
        and language class at the Oneida Nation Elementary School recently spent the
        afternoon playing bingo.

        But the students put a different spin on the popular game. Each game was
        played entirely using the Oneida language.

        Eagle Shield Director Brings in $100,000 Award

        BROWNING - Connie Bremner transformed a tribal senior center into a health
        care facility that now serves more than 600 elderly and disabled people a
        year. Thanks to her efforts, the Eagle Shield Senior Citizens Center on the
        Blackfeet Reservation is now $95,000 richer.

        Bremner, 66, of Browning, is one of 10 people nationwide to receive a
        $100,000 Robert Wood Johnson Community Health Leadership Program award, from
        a pool of 577 nominees.

        PowerUP Funds Computer Lab

        PINE RIDGE — The SuAnne Big Crow Boys & Girls Club in Pine Ridge will
        celebrate the completion of a new computer lab today during an open house and
        summer membership kickoff.

        The club recently finished the computer lab with a $7,000 grant from a
        foundation that seeks to bridge the digital divide.

        The new computer lab was set up with help from PowerUP, an organization
        comprised of nonprofit groups, corporations and state and federal government
        agencies.

        Mohegans Give $10M to Smithsonian Museum

        Mohegan — Hoping to educate people about Eastern Indians, the Mohegan Tribe
        is giving $10 million toward the $220 million National Museum of the American
        Indian on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

        “The museum will depict the Native American story, including Eastern
        Indians,” said Mohegan Tribal Chairman Mark Brown.

        Revising History in Plymouth

        Indian history is gaining space with Pilgrim myth in the Massachusetts
        community that calls itself America's "hometown."

        Plymouth, a seaside town 50 miles south of Boston, prides itself as the place
        where English pilgrims arrived aboard the vessel Mayflower in 1620,
        established a colony, befriended the indigenous natives and had them over for
        a feast in 1621.

        Chiefs Ride Provides a Walk Through History

        TIMBER LAKE, S.D. - About 78 riders a day followed a weeklong trail from
        Cannonball, N.D., to Green Grass. Those who rode through the prairie and
        buttes on the Standing Rock and Cheyenne River Sioux reservations were
        treated to a living history of the area.

        Mining Hills for Tourists
        Imagine the majestic patience of the people known as hunter-gatherers. The
        diligence to track game. The perseverance to assemble enough roots or acorns
        for dinner. The endurance to wait calmly until the moment is ripe.

        Losing the World's Languages

        Just as the world is becoming less biologically diverse, it is also becoming
        less linguistically diverse. By the end of this century, linguists believe
        that at least half of the 6,800 languages spoken today will be extinct.

        Some experts forecast the loss could be as high as 90 percent, according to
        the Worldwatch Institute in Washington.

        CSUSM Professor, Tribes Partner for Better Libraries

        SAN MARCOS, CA-- Libraries have long been said to be the repositories of
        civilization, but for many California Indian tribes, libraries are a luxury
        they can't afford, putting important documents on American Indian history and
        culture at risk of being lost.

        Former Nurse Teaches Respect Via Action

        With memories dating back more than half a century, Yvonne Powers remembers a
        now intoxicated village as a place where she once enjoyed cotton candy,
        carnivals and picnics.

        "In the olden days when I was little - I was born in 1931 in the Pine Ridge
        hospital - they used to call Whiteclay 'doings,' " she said, doings meaning
        something going on, an event.

        Boys State Participants Hear Talk on Whiteclay

        Native spokesman Frank LaMere urged Boys State participants on Wednesday to
        be concerned about heavy alcohol sales to Pine Ridge reservation Natives in
        the Nebraska border town of Whiteclay.

        The state needs to "stop the illegal sale of alcohol" in the tiny
        unincorporated village, which is awash in beer sales to Natives, LaMere told
        the high school students from across Nebraska.

        Cheyenne River Tribal Member Soars in Academy Boxing Arena

        COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. - A 20-year-old Cheyenne River Sioux tribal member is
        making his mark as a contender in the ring as a part of the U.S. Air Force
        Academy team. Clell Knight, who spent his summers on the South Dakota
        reservation, has a rare chance of joining an elite list of cadets who have
        distinguished themselves as top-level boxers within the annals of academy
        history.

        Young People of the Gwich'in Nation Call a Gathering in Arctic Village, Alaska

        The Gwich'in Indians of northeast Alaska and northwest Canada met for the
        first time in hundreds of years back in June of 1988. The Chiefs, the Elders,
        and tribal members met with one goal in mind. They united in solidarity and
        in one voice to protect the Porcupine River Caribou Herd calving area in the
        Arctic National Wildlife Refuge from oil development and exploration.

        GRAMMY at the Gathering

        Recently, the Western Region, of the GRAMMY's, continued its outreach to the
        Native American community at the annual Gathering of Nations Powwow in
        Albuquerque.

        The Gathering of Nations Powwow, North America's biggest powwow, took place
        on April 26-28 at the University Arena ("the Pit") on the University of New
        Mexico campus. More than 3,000 Native Indian dancers and singers representing
        more than 500 tribes from Canada and the United States attended.

        Collaring Moose
        On the tail of urban wanderers, biologist gathers behavior hints

        Moose No. 6 wasn't cooperating.

        A loud steady click from a radio receiver, like a metronome, showed the
        radio-collared cow moose was close, probably just down the road from the
        Campbell Creek Science Center. But each time Fish and Game biologist Rick
        Sinnott ducked into the woods to look, the moose slipped away through birch
        and spruce.

        Indian Leaders Worry About Losing Languages

        For all of his 29 years, Cody Ware has been speaking his tribe’s language.
        But he worries when he hears more English than Apsaalooke spoken in
        classrooms filled with young members of the Crow tribe.

        Tribal leaders throughout Montana identify with Ware’s concern.

        Ten years ago, more that 85 percent of school-age Crow spoke their tribal
        language. By 1995, that number had dropped to fewer than 25 percent,
        according to research from Little Big Horn College in Crow Agency.

        CALL TO ACTION

        The Indigenous Environmental Network, the International Indian Treaty Council
        and Greenaction issue this call to action to stop George W. Bush's plan to
        drill for oil in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Oil drilling in this
        beautiful area would violate the human rights of the Gwich'in Native Peoples,
        would pollute the pristine wilderness of the Arctic Refuge, and would
        threaten the survival of the porcupine caribou and the Gwich'in.

        We ask organizations from all walks of life to sign the Statement of Support
        for the Gwich'in in their fight against the proposed oil drilling.

        We will deliver this statement to the Gwich'in on June 22, 2001 in Arctic
        Village, Alaska. We will also send it to President George W. Bush and
        Congress to demand they drop this oil drilling plan now.

        About This Issue's Greeting - "Aquay"

        The Mohegan Tribe's language is an Algonquian dialect, which is currently
        undergoing restoration and revival.


        This Date In History

        Recipe: Sugarfree Sweets

        Story: The Young Man and the Box Turtle

        What is this: Eastern Box Turtle

        Project: The Beading Series - Part 8

        This Issue's Web sites

        Opportunities

        "OPPORTUNITIES" is from sources distributed nationally and includes
        scholarships, grants, internships, fellowships, and career opportunities as
        well as announcements for conferences, workshops and symposia.

        Canku Ota is a free Newsletter celebrating Native America, its traditions
        and accomplishments . We do not provide subscriber or visitor names to
        anyone. Some articles presented in Canku Ota may contain copyright material.
        We have received appropriate permissions for republishing any articles.
        Material appearing here is distributed without profit or monetary gain to
        those who have expressed an interest. This is in accordance with Title 17
        U.S.C. section 107.

        Canku Ota is a copyright © 2000, 2001 of Vicki Lockard and Paul Barry.

        The "Canku Ota - A Newsletter Celebrating Native America" web site and its
        design is the Copyright © 1999, 2000, 2001 of Paul C. Barry.
        All Rights Reserved.
      • Garnet1654@aol.com
        This is a summary of what you will find in this issue, to read the articles in their entirety, visit: Canku Ota (Many
        Message 3 of 10 , Jul 13, 2001
          This is a summary of what you will find in this issue, to read the articles
          in their entirety, visit:

          <A HREF="http://www.turtletrack.org">Canku Ota (Many Paths)</A>
          http://www.turtletrack.org
          http://209.164.117.58/ (alternate URL)
          An Online Newsletter Celebrating Native America

          July 14, 2001 - Issue 40

          "Hè"
          Lenape
          "pronounced as (Hey) translated as (Hi or hello) as a greeting."

          "KELMUYA"
          Fledgling Raptor Moon
          HOPI

          "Think not forever of yourselves, O chiefs, nor of your own generation. Think
          of continuing generations of our families, think of our grandchildren and of
          those yet unborn, whose faces are coming from beneath the ground."

          Peacemaker, Founder of the Iroquois Confederacy circa 1000 AD
          ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

          --------------------
          We Salute
          Michael LaFromboise

          BILLINGS, MT - Michael LaFromboise wants to help other young people walk the
          rickety bridge between traditional American Indian culture and western
          values.

          While earning a degree from MSU-Billings, LaFromboise was hired as executive
          director of the Billings-based Montana United Indian Association.
          ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

          -----------------------------------
          Artist:
          Tony Jojola

          Tony Jojola (Isleta Pueblo) is one of only a handful Native American glass
          blowers. Born on the Isleta Pueblo in New Mexico, Jojola began working as a
          potter at a young age. After enrolling at the Institute of American Indian
          Arts in Santa Fe, he was exposed to the art of glass blowing. Further
          training at the Haystack Mountain School of Crafts in Deer Isle, Maine, led
          to a period of study at the Pilchuck Glass School in Seattle, Washington,
          where he served as a studio assistant to Dale Chihuly, the acknowledged
          master of American glass art.

          "I rely on my Native American culture to create our old traditional and
          ceremonial forms such as seed jars, baskets and ollas in glass. Pueblo people
          have always created in clay."
          ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

          -------------------------------------
          New Wealth of History Helps Tribes Fill Gaps

          EUGENE, OR - Archivists at the Smithsonian Institution didn't give Jason
          Younker much hope when he and some fellow students went there six years ago
          in hopes of resurrecting the lost history of their Coquille ancestors.

          It's too small a tribe, the University of Oregon graduate students were told;
          you're not going to find much. JoAllyn Archambault, the director of the
          American Indian Program at the Smithsonian, was so confident that she offered
          to pay the copying fees for anything the team found.

          It turned out to be an expensive offer.
          ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

          -----------------------------------------
          Tribal School Teaches Language, Traditions

          SUTTON, AK - About 100 people participated in a powwow on the grounds of the
          Chickaloon Native Village headquarters Saturday, a benefit for the village's
          tribal school. Yah Ne Dah Ah School was founded more than a decade ago by
          elder and clan grandmother Kathleen Wade as a means to pass on Chickaloon's
          language and traditions to the tribe's children.

          Wade was pleased with the turnout in support of the school.
          ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

          -----------------------------------------
          Teams Will Aid Natives in Schools

          A nonprofit Native group plans to spend up to $2 million annually in
          Anchorage public schools to help the many Native students who either give up
          and drop out or stay in school and earn low grades.

          Beginning this fall, Cook Inlet Tribal Council Inc. proposes to send teams of
          three people, including a counselor, a tutor and a home coordinator, into
          middle schools and high schools to work one on one with Native students and
          their families.
          ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

          ------------------------------------------
          Nez Perce Museum Boasts Huge Collection of Ancient Canoes

          SPALDING, ID - At the Nez Perce National Historical Park, two men crouch
          around a weathered, wooden canoe.

          Both work intently, focusing on cracks and structural weaknesses in the
          weathered wood.

          Decades ago, long legs were tucked inside the bed of this canoe, along with
          baskets of fish or dried meat and furs.
          ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

          -------------------------------------
          Anishinaabe Horse Program Teaches Values, Tribal Historical Ties to Animals

          Sheldon Shebala sits erect on the paint horse, cowboy boots in the stirrups,
          black waist-length braids dangling from beneath a white cowboy hat.

          "This here is Ronald," he tells the two dozen kids standing outside the
          corral, eager (or nervous) for their turn to ride. "I just met him yesterday.
          He seems to be a really nice horse."
          ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

          ---------------------------------------------
          Family Event Highlights Miccosukee Culture

          Covering himself with sand for a better grip, a 10-year-old boy climbed a
          greased pole and was the first to reach a $100 bill taped to the top Sunday
          during the ninth annual Miccosukee Freedom Festival.

          "I put sand everywhere and climbed up fast," said Luis Rodriguez of Leisure
          City, who won last year.
          ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

          --------------------------------------------
          Lumbees Celebrate Heritage

          PEMBROKE, NC -- It took James Hite nearly 50 years to attend his first Lumbee
          Homecoming.

          He left the event Saturday afternoon planning to return next year.

          Hite and thousands of other Lumbee Indians gathered in Pembroke for the
          tribe’s annual homecoming. Organizers estimated more than 30,000 people
          attended this year’s event.
          ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

          -------------------------------------------
          Students Find Strong Connections in Tai Chi

          LAWRENCE, KS - Upward Bound students at Haskell Indian Nations University are
          finding the ancient art of tai chi isn't all that far from the values of
          their own Native American roots.

          Bill Douglas, a 20-year veteran of the art of stress relief, is teaching
          students this summer to control their stress and even their anger.
          ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

          -----------------------------------------
          Tribes Try to Restore Native Languages

          Hilman Tobey dreams that his grandchildren one day will speak the language
          native to the Nevada region where they are from.

          And he’s not talking about English.

          “Back in those days,” said the 86-year-old from Pyramid Lake, “the kids got
          together and they spoke Paiute. That’s all they spoke. The only time we spoke
          English was in school.”
          ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

          -------------------------------------------
          'Windtalkers' Star is the Real Thing

          TSAILE, AZ - "Oh just to hear that cadence again," the sound of the military
          and marching, that's all Roger Willie really wanted after serving four years
          in the U.S. Army.

          Willie's dream became a reality when he was cast as a Navajo Codetalker in
          the upcoming movie, "Windtalkers," produced by award-winning director John
          Woo.

          So, how did a Navajo Army veteran with two bachelor's degrees and a family
          become an actor in a feature film?
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          Ignacio's Yellow Jacket Drum Group Adjusts to Changing Times

          IGNACIO, CO – When the members of Yellow Jacket circle around their drum to
          sing, the music that emerges is timeless.

          "It’s something that’s been going on in Native American culture forever,"
          said Tyson Thompson, a member of the singing group for four years. "We’re
          just trying to keep it alive."
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          Sister Act: Corn, Beans and Squash

          In an age of shrinking yards and gardens, it is useful to remember that
          Native American tribes knew how to use land efficiently for food production.
          One ancient tradition was planting what was known as the “three sisters” -
          corn, beans and squash.

          These were sown together on the same bit of land, whether a small garden or a
          whole field. They complement each other well.
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          The Legend of the Cherokee Rose

          The Cherokee were driven from their homelands in North Carolina and Georgia
          over 100 years ago when gold was discovered in their lands. The journey known
          as the "Trail of Tears". It was a terrible time for the people - many died
          from the hardships and the women wept. The old men knew the women must be
          strong to help the children survive so they called upon the Great One to help
          their people and to give the mothers strength.
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          Two Cultures Shaped Leadership Style

          BELLINGHAM, WA - Though the idea of many American Indians living in two
          worlds has often been derided by American Indian authors and social critics,
          it is becoming more and more of an everyday occurrence.

          Take Amy Finkbonner for example. As last year's Associated Student Body
          president at Western Washington University, Amy learned her heritage provided
          unique insight she found particularly valuable to her elected job.
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          O'odham Celebrate First Graduation

          SELLS, AZ - Standing proudly in her graduation cap and gown, Rebecca Antone
          said she will continue her education and hopes to inspire other young teenage
          mothers to pursue their education and dreams.

          "Just don't give up. I know how hard it can be," said Antone, who became a
          mother at 14.

          Antone was among the first 28 graduates of Tohono O'odham Community College.
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          Meeting of Minds in S.D.

          Cesar Pozo tucked a basketball under his arm when he took off for South
          Dakota's Pine Ridge Reservation last week with 18 other city teenagers.

          The teen basketball players — many who have never been out of the city or on
          an airplane — all have visions of what awaits them.
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          Crew Tries to Capture Whaling Culture on Film

          BARROW, AK - The day was warm and clear. A group of four Inupiat whalers
          paddled a skin boat along the remaining shore ice followed by an aluminum
          boat full of filmmakers with a motion picture camera grinding.

          "This light is amazing," director Bestor Cram said. "This is great stuff. Did
          you get that?"
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          American Indian Workshops Make Art from Everyday Items

          Hal Brightcloud of San Rafael carefully painted his face half red, half black
          to show how his native Muscogee (Creek) tribe in Oklahoma used to adorn
          themselves.

          Speaking to the handful of people who have come to his Sunday afternoon
          face-painting workshop in Novato, he explained that red represents blood, or
          life, and that face-painting has long been an important form of art among
          American Indians.
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          Actor, Musician Speak to Cherokee Campers

          TAHLEQUAH, OK - More than 30 kids at Cherokee Nation’s fitness camps got a
          special treat this week with a visit by actor Steve Reevis and musician Tommy
          Wildcat.

          Reevis, who has appeared in several movies, including Dances with Wolves,
          Fargo and Geronimo, gave an inspirational speech instructing the campers
          about the importance of education and perseverance.
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          Watonka: A Book Review

          In a dream, the Great Spirit reveals to the descendant of a Sioux warrior how
          children will help bring peace to the tormented spirits of Arapaho ghost
          dancers. Two mysterious young visitors join forces with two boys in a small
          Oklahoma town, and are led to Little Fox, the great-niece of a revered
          Cheyenne medicine man.
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          A Family Story
          by Richard L. Slater

          This family story is for my children and grandchildren, whom I love very
          much. I sincerely wanted them to have a record of their old people so that
          they would know where they came from and who their old people were. Children,
          I ask that you remember and respect these facts of our lives.

          Prior to writing this story of our family, I kept asking myself, "Where do I
          start? ".
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          About This Issue's Greeting - "He'

          Lenape is of the Algonquian language class, the words are of the Unami
          dialect.

          This Date In History
          Recipe: Three Sisters
          Story: Learning From the Bear
          What is this: American Black Bear
          Project: Hairpipes - Part 2
          This Issue's Web sites

          Opportunities

          "OPPORTUNITIES" is from sources distributed nationally and includes
          scholarships, grants, internships, fellowships, and career opportunities as
          well as announcements for conferences, workshops and symposia.

          Canku Ota is a free Newsletter celebrating Native America, its traditions and
          accomplishments . We do not provide subscriber or visitor names to anyone.
          Some articles presented in Canku Ota may contain copyright material. We have
          received appropriate permissions for republishing any articles. Material
          appearing here is distributed without profit or monetary gain to those who
          have expressed an interest. This is in accordance with Title 17 U.S.C.
          section 107.

          Canku Ota is a copyright © 2000, 2001 of Vicki Lockard and Paul Barry.

          The "Canku Ota - A Newsletter Celebrating Native America" web site and its
          design is the Copyright © 1999, 2000, 2001 of Paul C. Barry.
          All Rights Reserved.
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