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First Nations and Justice !

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  • ghwelker
    http://www.gambillonjustice.com/home/first_nations_and_justice Greetings, I have gradually ebbed out of the group as I have been focusing on other projects and
    Message 1 of 70 , Feb 20, 2013
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      http://www.gambillonjustice.com/home/first_nations_and_justice

      Greetings,

         I have gradually ebbed out of the group as I have been focusing on other projects and personal matters over the past couple of years and others have taken over the moderator roles here during that time. As a few here know I moved to Mexico about 2 1\2 years ago....and it is quite a change from my native Minnesota, but I love it. At any rate, one of the projects aforementioned has been a web-based effort I am calling Gambill on Justice (pun fully intended for the notion and effectuation of "justice" in the United States is pretty much a crap shoot largely determined by the color of one's skin and one's socio-economic status rather than one governed by notions of "right" and "wrong". You may all find the link to the stuff on First Nations and Justice here:

      http://www.gambillonjustice.com/home/first_nations_and_justice

        "Justice" here defined relates to justice in multiple contexts; environmental, historical, social, civil and criminal. I am doing something here that has not yet been done---pulling a wide array of materials for North, South and Central America, as well as, the Caribbean into one place for people to network and use....hopefully to the benefit of regular folks and minority populations to bring about an higher level of justice for larger numbers of people.

         I spent the last year doing this and it is only now starting to really get up to snuff. We are in process of translating all the pages into Spanish.....at some future date we will probably be adding in Portuguese translations for all the pages.

         As some here know I have spent many years advocating for veterans of the military and the last thing I did before leaving the States was set up a Tribal Veterans Court in Minnesota's 8th Judicial District. On my Veterans pages you will find additional materials for Native American combat veterans.

         At any rate, I just wanted to make the group aware of this resource and, as always, your input is very welcome....just write to me at my personal e-mail, gambillgt1@...

         You will note that on my Ojibwe and Justice pages Charlie wrote the intro....very kind of him.

      Take care,

      Guy Gambill
      Expatriate living near Guadalajara, Mexico
      ------------------------------------

      Mii gwech
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    • ghwelker
      http://vimeo.com/63898681 This exhibition has been co-organized by the National Museum of the American Indian and the Smithsonian Latino Center. Drawing from
      Message 70 of 70 , Apr 17 9:47 AM
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        http://vimeo.com/63898681


        This exhibition has been co-organized by the National Museum of the American Indian and the Smithsonian Latino Center.


        Drawing from more than 17,000 objects in the collections of the National Museum of the American Indian, Cerámica de los Ancestros is a celebration of Central America’s diverse and dynamic ancestral heritage. For thousands of years, Central America has been home to vibrant civilizations, each with unique, sophisticated ways of life, value systems, and arts. The ceramics these peoples left behind, combined with recent archaeological discoveries, help tell the stories of these dynamic cultures and their achievements.


        The early histories of Central American cultures follow similar paths. By 1500 BC, people had settled in large villages, where they cultivated, hunted, and gathered wild foods. Maize agriculture supported growing populations, and distinct forms of status, leadership, belief systems, and arts emerged regionally. Social and trade networks connected Central American communities to peoples in South America, Mesoamerica, and the Caribbean, sharing knowledge, technology, artworks, and systems of status and political organization.


        Europeans’ arrival brought further changes. Native peoples have often struggled to maintain distinct identities and lifeways, or have merged with dominant cultures. Despite these changes, the legacy of Central America’s civilizations continues to resonate in their descendants’ lives and those of other Central Americans.


        Cerámica de los Ancestros looks at seven regions representing distinct Central American cultural areas. These regions are today part of Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama.


        Accompanied by an interactive website, a landmark publication, and a full schedule of educational and public programs, Cerámica de los Ancestros represents a pioneering effort by the Smithsonian to promote a better understanding of the creative pre-Contact cultures of Central America while engaging a new Latino audience.


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