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Kanginguak - Inuit

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  • Blue Panther
    Kanginguak - Inuit Kanginguak was a native of the south, who set forth on a journey and took up his abode near Umanarsuak (Kin of Sael, a high island of South
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 1, 2008

      Kanginguak - Inuit

      Kanginguak was a native of the south, who set forth on a journey and took up his abode near Umanarsuak (Kin of Sael, a highisland of South Greenland ). He had a son named Tunerak, who was such an expert rower that he used to overtake the falcons in their flight, and killed them with a blow of his paddle-oar. He went out to sea so far as to make Umanarsuak appear like a seal diving up and down among the waves. He also tried matches with celebrated kayakers, but on one of these occasions he was killed by his rival. His father afterwards went to the place where he was buried, brought out his body again and carried it along with him, till he found an angakok, who restored it to life.

      Tales and Traditions of the Eskimo, by Henry Rink; London [1875] and is now in the public domain. [ Greenland ]

    • Blue Panther
      Kanginguak - Inuit Kanginguak was a native of the south, who set forth on a journey and took up his abode near Umanarsuak (Kin of Sael, a high island of South
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 4, 2014

        Kanginguak - Inuit

        Kanginguak was a native of the south, who set forth on a journey and took up his abode near Umanarsuak (Kin of Sael, a high island of South Greenland). He had a son named Tunerak, who was such an expert rower that he used to overtake the falcons in their flight, and killed them with a blow of his paddle-oar. He went out to sea so far as to make Umanarsuak appear like a seal diving up and down among the waves. He also tried matches with celebrated kayakers, but on one of these occasions he was killed by his rival. His father afterwards went to the place where he was buried, brought out his body again and carried it along with him, till he found an angakok, who restored it to life.

        Tales and Traditions of the Eskimo, by Henry Rink; London [1875] and is now in the public domain. [Greenland]


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