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[indigenous_peoples_literature] Re: indigenous_peoples_literature digest

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  • CALLING CROW KOGVHYANIHA
    O siyo and welcome to all the new people to this wonderful list...there is so much valuable information here...a place to write - to share the gifts which we
    Message 1 of 56 , Nov 30, 1999
      O'siyo and welcome to all the new people to this
      wonderful list...there is so much valuable information
      here...a place to write - to share the gifts which we
      have been given to share with all.....

      There is so much good information here and valuable
      links provided too.

      And good people!!!

      Wado Glenn for the hard work that you do and I am so
      glad to be here.

      Your udo, Calling Crow

      =====
      "Lead but I may not follow. Follow but I may not lead. Stand beside me and call me Friend."
      "Greet each new sunrise with joy, and you will greet each sunset with peace."
      http://www.oe-pages.com/RELIGION/Paganism/callingcrow/
      (the above URL ADDRESSES ARE THE ONLY CATEGORY OFFERED - THIS IS A NATIVE AMERICAN INDIAN WEB PAGE)
      http://www.ancientsites.com/users/MORNINGSTAR_CALLINGCROW
      http://www.ancientsites.com/users/MORNINGSTAR_RAVENATNIGHT
      __________________________________________________
      Do You Yahoo!?
      Thousands of Stores. Millions of Products. All in one place.
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    • Doug Groh
      Hi Glenn; Just figured I would drop you a line and ask if I have been removed from the group. Haven t received a message since 3/24/00. I know I m not a good
      Message 56 of 56 , Mar 29, 2000
        Re: indigenous_peoples_literature digest Hi Glenn;

        Just figured I would drop you a line and ask if I have been removed from the group.
        Haven't received a message since 3/24/00.

        I know I'm not a good member, but I don't know much about computers, I can't write poetry, and I can't tell good stories like Rusty Wire.  But I sure do like readin em!  If I need to do something please let me know.

        Thanks
        dougg3@...
        Doug

        ----------
        From: "eGroups Digest" <indigenous_peoples_literature@egroups.com>
        To: dougg3@...
        Subject: indigenous_peoples_literature digest
        Date: Thu, Mar 16, 2000, 10:25 AM



        eGroups: indigenous_peoples_literature <http://www.eGroups.com/list/indigenous_peoples_literature/?start=2811>  Daily Digest
        13 new messages


        MsgFromSubject 2811 <#2811> Anne Frasi               Fw: Colombia - Urgent! Urgent! Urgent! 2812 <#2812> Anne Frasi               Fw: DOCUMENTARY ON GUSTAFSEN LAKE: MARCH 17 2813 <#2813> Anne Frasi               Fw: Montana Report Finds Prison Racism 2814 <#2814> Anne Frasi               Fw: Dead Men Do Tell Tales 2815 <#2815> Anne Frasi               Fw: Black Elk Speaks production scheduled in Ada, 2816 <#2816> Anne Frasi               No Subject 2817 <#2817> Anne Frasi               Fw: The Fernando Eros Caro case - part 22 2818 <#2818> Anne Frasi               Fw:  Grass Roots Oyate of Pine Ridge 2819 <#2819> Glenn Welker             Please Help My Father (Possible Relative of Sequo 2820 <#2820> Anne Frasi               Fw: Initiative Against Economic Globalization - P 2821 <#2821> Anne Frasi               Fw: ~BamaRiver~ Native American Wisdom 2822 <#2822> Jeannot Mayr             Standing Deer 2823 <#2823> Lydia Nolan              Re: Passages to the Sky






        Message: 2811
        From: "Anne Frasi"
        Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2000 19:04:23 -0000
        X-Mailing-List: indigenous_peoples_literature@egroups.com
        Subject: [indigenous_peoples_literature] Fw: Colombia - Urgent! Urgent! Urgent!
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        >Subject: Urgent! Urgent! Urgent!
        >
        >Hello all!
        >
        >Please distribute this as widely as possible!  It is very important!
        >
        >Thanks,
        >
        >Soha
        >
        >----------------
        >
        >Urgent Action
        >
        >EMBERA KATIO FACE THREAT
        >OF FORCIBLE REMOVAL
        >
        >
        >[March 14, 2000]  ICCHRLA has just received an urgent phone call from our
        >South America Coordinator Bill FairbairnÊcurrently on a fact-finding visit
        >to ColombiaÊrequesting immediate action to prevent further violations of
        >the rights of the Embera Katio.
        >
        >As you will remember from previous actions circulated by ICCHRLA, the
        >Embera Katio nation live along the Upper Sinu river in northern Cordoba and
        >have seen their rights repeatedly violated as a result of a hydroelectric
        >project that received financing assistance from Canada's Export Development
        >Corporation to the tune of $18.2 million (US). In contravention of both
        >Colombian and international law, the Embera Katio were never consulted
        >about the Urra I hydroelectric project before it was built and have seen
        >fish in the riverÊthe mainstay of their dietÊdisappear since the project's
        >dam was built. In November, in contravention of an injunction from the
        >Constitutional Court, the Urra consortium began filling a reservoir to feed
        >the dam, an operation which will floodÊand destroyÊ Embera lands, crops,
        >homes, burial grounds and sacred sites.
        >
        >More than a hundred Embera Katio have been camped outside the Ministry of
        >the Environment for the past 3 months in protest, calling for a meeting
        >with the Environment Minister in order to seek a negotiated solution.  The
        >Minister has so far refused to speak with the Embera.
        >
        >
        >NEW THREATS AGAINST EMBERA - INTERNATIONAL RESPONSE REQUESTED
        >According to Bill Fairbairn, there are strong indications that the
        >government is about to take action to forcibly remove Embera families from
        >land that is being affected by the filling of the reservoir. This presents
        >new cause for concern, particularly in light of the fact that in February,
        >government action to forcibly remove members of the U'wa nationÊprotesting
        >oil exploration by a U.S. multinational on their landsÊresulted in the
        >death of three U'wa children. The whereabouts of at least six other U'wa
        >remain unknown.
        >
        >Any dislocation of the Embera Katio families would be a contravention of
        >the ruling of Colombia's Constitutional Court.  We urge all ICCHRLA
        >supporters to send urgent messages of concern AS SOON AS POSSIBLE calling
        >on the Colombian government to respect that ruling by meeting with the
        >affected communities and suspending the filling of the reservoir until a
        >collective agreement is reached with them regarding adequate compensation.
        >Specifically, urge the government to respect the rights of the Embera and
        >NOT engage in any forcible removal of Embera families.
        >
        >
        >Please send urgent messages to:
        >1.   Dr. Juan Mayr Maldonado, Ministro del Medio Ambiente (Colombia's
        >Minister of the Environment), Calle 37, No 8-40, SantafÈ de Bogot·,
        >Colombia. Fax: (571) 2889788. E-mail: juan-mayr-m@...
        >Copies of this letter should be sent to (1) Senor Presidente Andres
        >Pastrana, Palacio de Narino, Carrera 8, No 7-26, SantafÈ de Bogot·,
        >Colombia. Fax: (571) 2867434 or 2866842 or 2842186. E-mail:
        >pastrana@...  AND (2) His Excellency JosÈ MarÌa de Guzm·n
        >Mora, Colombian Ambassador in Canada, 360 Albert St. Suite 1002 Ottawa K1R
        >7X7. Fax: (613) 230-4416. E-mail: embcolt@...
        >2.  Canadians should also write to Canada's Foreign Affairs Minister,
        >arguing that since a Canadian crown corporation helped to finance the Urra
        >Megaproject, Canada must assume responsibility to ensure the rights of the
        >Embera are not further violated and intercede with the Colombian government
        >calling for no forcible displacement and suspension of the filling of the
        >reservoir until a negotiated solution involving the entire community is
        >reached. Write to: The Hon. Lloyd Axworthy, Minister of Foreign Affairs,
        >Room 418-N, Center Block, Ottawa, ON. Fax: (613) 996-3443. E-mail:
        >AxworL@...
        >Copies of this letter should be sent to:  (1) G.E. Rishchynski, Ambassador,
        >Embassy of Canada, Cra. 7, No. 115-33, AA 53531, Bogota, Colombia. Fax.
        >571-657-9912. E-mail: bgota-gr@...  (2)  ICCHRLA, 129 St.
        >Clair Ave. W., Toronto, ON. M4V 1N5 (icchrla@...);  (3) Resguardo
        >Embera Katio del Alto Sinu (the Embera Katio leadership), Apartado AÈreo
        >770, MonterÌa, CÛrdoba, Colombia (camaemka@...); and  (4)
        >Clerk of the Canadian Parliamentary Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs
        >and International Trade, 180 Wellington St., Room 637, Ottawa, K1A 0A6
        >(hilchj@...).
        >
        >BACKGROUND
        > Since the Urra Dam was built, fish in the upper Sinu River have
        >virtually disappeared, robbing the Embera Katio of the mainstay of their
        >diet. The Embera are now suffering from diseases brought on by
        >malnutrition, as well as malaria, a disease that was virtually unheard of
        >before the dam created standing water.  The Embera obtained an injunction
        >from Colombia's Constitutional Court stopping the Urra consortium from
        >filling the dam's reservoir until an agreement over fitting compensation
        >could be reached with the communities whose lands and homes would be
        >flooded. The Urra consortium violated Embera rights under Colombian law and
        >international accords like ILO Convention 169 by failing to consult with
        >them until after the dam was built.
        > Since the injunction, Urra has offered limited amounts of money as
        >compensation to some individuals.  The Embera leadership has denounced this
        >as a blatant attempt to divide indigenous communities and argues that just
        >as damage to the communities was collective; compensation must also be
        >allocated in a collective manner so as to ensure the social and cultural
        >survival and cohesion of Embera communities. Colombia's Constitutional
        >Court and the Ombudsman (Defensor del Pueblo) have ruled that negotiations
        >must take place with the entire community.  The most urgent need is for
        >land on which families can resettle, have access to fish and grow crops
        >that will provide long term food security.
        > With approval from the Environment Ministry, the Urra consortium
        >started filling the dam's reservoir on November 18. This action was
        >initiated without having consulted or informed Embera leaders, nor having
        >made any effort to relocate the people whose homes will be flooded. Non-
        >indigenous fishermen from the Medio and Bajo Sinu have stated they fear an
        >ecological catastrophe.
        >
        >
        >------------------------------------------------------------------
        >Soha Al-Haddad
        >VC Administration
        >Canadian Graduate Council
        >
        >520-2600, ext. 8270
        >sahaddad@...
        >
        >"I call biotech and patenting and so on the colonization of the future.
        > And I think it is something we can't allow to be colonized. The
        > colonization of the past only has some victims in the world.  The
        > colonization of the future has us all in solidarity,"
        >
        > Vandana Shiva
        >------------------------------------------------------------------
        >


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        Message: 2812
        From: "Anne Frasi"
        Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2000 19:35:33 -0000
        X-Mailing-List: indigenous_peoples_literature@egroups.com
        Subject: [indigenous_peoples_literature] Fw: DOCUMENTARY ON GUSTAFSEN LAKE: MARCH 17
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        From: "Chris"
        Via: "sovernet"
        Subject: Fw: DOCUMENTARY ON GUSTAFSEN LAKE: MARCH 17 (fwd)
        Date: Tue, 14 Mar 2000 19:03:49 -0800

        Subject: DOCUMENTARY ON GUSTAFSEN LAKE: MARCH 17

        DOCUMENTARY ON INFAMOUS CANADIAN ARMED SIEGE OF GUSTAFSEN
        SUNDANCE GROUNDS
        ON ABORIGINAL PEOPLES' NETWORK: PLEASE COPY AND DISTRIBUTE

        "Above the Law" Gustafsen Lake siege will be shown on Friday, March 17,
        2000 during the Our People show at:

        Eastern Time - 11:00am, 3:00pm amd 9:00pm
        Pacific Time - 8:00am, 12:00pm and 6:00pm

        Please check out our schedule listing on the internet at www.aptn.ca

        Meegwetch,
        Cheryl Slater
        Administrative Assistant


         --------------------------------------------------------------------------

        WE WILL NEVER FORGET GUSTAFSEN LAKE - FOR AN PUBLIC INQUIRY NOW!

        for further information:

        http://kafka.uvic.ca/~vipirg/SISIS/gustmain.html
        http://kafka.uvic.ca/~vipirg/SISIS/GustLake/support.html


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        Message: 2813
        From: "Anne Frasi"
        Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2000 19:37:29 -0000
        X-Mailing-List: indigenous_peoples_literature@egroups.com
        Subject: [indigenous_peoples_literature] Fw: Montana Report Finds Prison Racism
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        Wed, 15 Mar 2000
        http://fp3.in-tch.com/www.billingsnews.com/current/index.htm

        Report finds prison racism
        By RON SELDEN
        For The Outpost

        The religious rights of American Indians in the state's prison system are
        being unfairly restricted, and the Montana

        Department of Corrections needs reforms to root out racism, according to a
        new report by a state researcher.

        The 26-page study, issued by Alexandra Witkin-New Holy, an assistant
        professor at Montana State University's

        Center for Native American Studies in Bozeman, contends that Indian
        prisoners are prevented from fully practicing their native rites and are
        treated
        in a racist manner throughout the  state's criminal justice system.

        The report is based on inmate correspondence, state and federal documents,
        and memos from recently retired state Indian affairs coordinator Wyman
        McDonald. It has been distributed to 40 state legislators, among others.

        "The information in this document establishes the need for the promulgation
        of new regulations, and if necessary state laws, to protect Native
        Americans'
        free exercise rights, as well as the need for further study regarding
        several
        issues relating to Montana's incarceration of native peoples," Ms.
        Witkin-New
        Holy wrote. "It is hoped that these steps may be taken in an atmosphere of
        cooperation and good will, that  Native American inmates and their
        communities do not have to resort to public condemnation and litigation
        against the state and the Department of Corrections."

        But prison authorities contend the report is one-sided and inaccurate. They
        say the department has already incorporated new rules that expand religious
        freedoms, and most inmates,  including Indians, have ample opportunity
        to practice any religion they choose.

        "I think we're pretty liberal compared to other states," said Dave Ohler,
        the department's chief legal counsel, who noted that very few
        religious-rights
        lawsuits are filed by Montana prisoners.

        "We're trying to accommodate them as much as we can," added Montana State
        Prison spokeswoman Linda Moodry.

        Ms. Witkin-New Holy disagrees.

        "Socially sanctioned racism can and does seep into every level of the
        criminal justice system from the numbers of police arrests, severity of
        charges,
        sentencing, treatment by corrections officers and parole board decisions,"
        she
        wrote. "Most will probably admit that all things being equal, whites are
        more likely to get a fair shake than Indians. ..."

        The bulk of the report focuses on religious-rights issues at the men's
        prison outside Deer Lodge, where about 17 percent of the inmates are Indian.
        Officials say Indians make up more than 30 percent of the inmate population
        at the Montana Women's Prison in Billings. According to 1990 Census figures,
        Indians make up less than 7 percent of state's total population.

        Corrections officials say that most Indian prisoners at the men's facility
        are allowed to take ceremonial sweats every Saturday in a willow lodge
        that's
        set up outside the prison's chapel. A  tipi, where other ceremonies are
        conducted, is also erected nearby. The prisoners sweat in shifts, with the
        low-security  side going in the morning and the high-security side
        following in
        the afternoon.

        Inmates who are locked down for disciplinary reasons and those in maximum
        security are not allowed to partake, Ms. Moodry confirmed.

        "The philosophy of the thing is to pray along the lines of the Sun Dance
        and the Pipe Dance for their survival while they're in the joint,
        especially for the
        young guys," Mr. McDonald said in  a phone interview from his home in
        Clarkston, Wash.

        As with the prison's other religious groups, the Indian inmates, banded
        together as the Prayer Warriors organization, must have a sponsor and
        security
        officers present before their ceremonies  can begin, Ms. Moodry said.
        Sponsors
        can come from the outside, but they must receive volunteer training before
        they're allowed to participate, she said.

        Several employees within the prison also serve as sponsors when outsiders
        can't make the trip to the prison, she added, and two Indian prisoners
        serve on
        the facility's Inmate Council,  which among other functions has a role in
        developing policies.

        But Ms. Witkin-New Holy and Mr. McDonald, who reached their conclusions
        independently, say Indian inmates are continually hassled by other prisoners
        and guards, and their privileges  tend to be taken away more quickly than
        those of non-Indians.

        They add that prison officials have reneged on agreements with the Prayer
        Warriors, confiscated sacred pipes and rattles, emptied medicine bags, and
        display an overall ignorance and  intolerance of native peoples and rituals.

        "Having the sweat is a continual problem," Mr. McDonald explained, adding
        that Indian inmates are "always pushed around as a group. If one guy gets
        into
        trouble, they all suffer. There's no tolerance at all. There's a lot of
        harassment."

        "In a state riddled with prejudice against Native Americans, the lack of
        anti-bias training for prison personnel and the lack of Native American
        employees
        breeds discriminatory treatment," Ms. Witkin-New Holy added in her report.
        "Such treatment has cultivated an environment where the First Amendment
        rights of Native inmates are frequently violated for trivial reasons."

        But Father Herbert Pins, a Catholic priest who works at the men's prison
        and the Montana State Hospital at Warm Springs, said he's seen marked
        improvement in the prison's religious tolerance in the two years he's been
        involved with the programs.

        I'm pretty aggressive about supporting the religious rights of all
        groups," he said, adding that 22 different religions are officially
        recognized at the
        prison, including a small number of inmates who practice witchcraft.

        Mr. Pins said that when he first started working at the prison, "I didn't
        think all religious rights were being validated, especially Native
        Americans." That
        belief prompted him to begin researching religious-rights issues in other
        areas
        of the country, as well as seek guidance from priests around Montana who
        regularly work with American Indians.

        The work, he said, has led to an improved religious climate not only for
        Indian inmates, but for all other groups, as well. New religious programming
        policies for the prison that he and others  helped develop were adopted by
        Warden Mike Mahoney in early December, he said.

        Mr. Pins said he's personally gotten involved in the Prayer Warriors'
        sweats and helps conduct Talking Circle therapy sessions for Indian
        prisoners.
        While the religious policies and procedures aren't perfect, things are
        improving, he contends.

        "We're still hammering it out," Mr. Pins said. "Humbly, we're realizing
        that we need to make some adjustments. We are doing our best to have them
        practice their religions."

        One area of recent conflict revolves around which Indian prisoners should
        be allowed to possess sacred pipes. According to Ms. Witkin-New Holy and Mr.
        McDonald, a pipe that is central to the sweat was suddenly confiscated
        last fall, despite an agreement that had been made with prison officials.
        "The pipe to them is their life raft," Mr. McDonald says. "They didn't need
        to (take away) that."

        But Ms. Moodry and other prison officials said new policies are now being
        formulated so pipes can be possessed by designated carriers, who will take
        care of them for the group. They also  note that smudging ceremonies, where
        sage, cedar, sweetgrass and other plant materials are burned, are allowed in
        the  prison chapel.

        However, Ms. Witkin-New Holy contends that Indian inmates "should be able
        to pray at the sweat lodge, with smudge, and with the sacred pipe as
        frequently
        and as easily as Christian  inmates can pray at the chapel."

        Ms. Witkin-Holy and Mr. McDonald also said they believe Indian prisoners
        could be more easily rehabilitated if they were allowed to incorporate more
        of
        their native ways, especially in  treatment and training programs.

        But now, they said, Indians lack social standing inside prison, as well as
        on the outside. Until that status changes and Indians retain more power
        within
        the system, their rights will continue  to be diminished.

        Steve Griffin, activities coordinator at the women's prison, said Indian
        inmates there are probably given wider latitude when it comes to religious
        activities, in part because the facility is  smaller than the men's prison.
        Sweetgrass, cedar and other sacred items can be burned by women inmates,
        but the materials  are kept locked up until they are requested. Indian
        spiritual
        advisers are also allowed to visit, but the women prisoners can't sweat
        because
        of a ban on open fires within the city of Billings.

        "We just try to accommodate as much as we can without compromising
        security," Mr. Griffin said.

        At the new Crossroads Correctional Center outside Shelby, the state's first
        privately run prison, officials said policies similar to the men's and
        women's
        prison have been incorporated and a sweat  lodge, which is used bi-weekly,
        has been constructed.

        Indian women at Crossroads are also allowed to have their own ceremonial
        sweats.

        In her report, Ms. Witkin-New Holy recommends that the state, among other
        provisions:
        - Conduct a statistical and qualitative study comparing Indian prison
        sentences, actual time served, and other justice-system decisions in
        comparison with non-Indians.
        - Immediately hire an Indian advocate and counselor who could serve as a
        liaison between inmates and the corrections department.
        - Provide anti-bias and other cultural training for all prison employees.
        - Develop and implement policies designed to curb racial harassment of
        Indians within the prisons.
        - Hire more Native Americans at all levels of the department, including
        administration.
        - Allow maximum-security inmates and those in lockdown to have weekly
        sweats, at a minimum, and access to sacred items.
        - Expand prison access for Indian spiritual leaders, and help pay for their

        travel, as is done with some Christian clergy.
          - Adjust grooming policies so inmates can wear their hair, including
        headbands, in conformity with their native nation's religious customs.
        "Native American religions are unique, unwritten, and little understood by
        non-natives," she said. "... If the Department of Corrections is unwilling
        to take
        such steps to protect the  free-exercise rights of Native Americans,
        then the state Legislature should step up and do so before expensive and
        time-consuming litigation further erodes relations between all concerned
        parties."

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        Message: 2814
        From: "Anne Frasi"
        Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2000 20:10:40 -0000
        X-Mailing-List: indigenous_peoples_literature@egroups.com
        Subject: [indigenous_peoples_literature] Fw: Dead Men Do Tell Tales
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        Wed, 15 Mar 2000
        http://www.journalnet.com/news/news3.html

        Dead men do tell tales
        Forensic expert says women, children were shot by Mormons

        SALT LAKE CITY (AP) - A forensic scientist who spent two days
        examining remains from an 1857 massacre in southern Utah
        says there is evidence that woman and children were shot, apparently by
        Mormons, and not bludgeoned by Indians.

        It's a conclusion that contradicts the historical record of the Mountain
        Meadow Massacre, which says Mormons shot the men and Indians beat the
        women and children to death. As many as 120 Arkansas emigrants traveling
        to California were killed near present-day Cedar City.

        The Salt Lake Tribune reported Monday that University of Utah forensic
        anthropologist Shannon Novak determined that massacre victims included
        women and at least one child who were shot in the head.

        Written accounts generally claim the women and older children were beaten
        or bludgeoned to death by Indians using crude weapons, while Mormon
        militiamen killed adult males by shooting them in the back of the head.

        The massacre occurred in a climate of war hysteria as Utah Mormons
        prepared for an invasion by federal troops sent to deal with a defiant
        Mormon theocracy under Brigham Young.

        Novak's partial reconstruction of approximately 20 different skulls of
        Mountain Meadows victims show that some were shot while facing their
        killers.

        The skull of at least one female victim exhibits possible evidence of a
        gunshot to the face, based on a preliminary examination of broken teeth,
        Novak said.

        ''Typically with history, the winning side writes the story,'' Novak says.
        ''This
        is giving the dead a chance to speak.''

        How much of a chance to speak is a contentious point, however.

        Novak and others complain that Utah Gov. Michael Leavitt ordered the
        remains quickly reburied, before the examinations were completed, in an
        effort to avoid further embarrassment to the state.

        State law requires that the remains be thoroughly studied, and some critics
        charge that Leavitt circumvented that law.

        The remains were accidentally uncovered Aug. 3 by a  contractor hired by
        the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The Mormon church was
        rebuilding a monument to massacre victims at the time.

        In a message to state antiquities officials, Leavitt wrote that he did not
        want
        controversy to highlight ''this sad moment in our state's history and the
        rather
        good-spirited attempt to put it behind us.''

        Some of the descendants of the massacre victims also objected to the
        remains being studied.

        ''Arkansas people have two virtues - caring for the sick and respecting the
        dead,'' Burr Fancher, a direct descendant of the massacre victims, wrote
        Aug. 24 to Brigham Young University's Office of Public Archaeology,
        which subcontracted with Novak to conduct the forensic analysis.

        ''One of our fundamental beliefs has been grossly violated so that a few
        people could play with bones and for what reason? Everyone knows who
        was buried there and every serious student of history knows why it
        happened.''

        At least one Utah historian agrees.

        ''It is not important we know exactly how these people were murdered; we
        already know they were killed,'' says Weber State University history
        professor Gene Sessions, a Mountain Meadows scholar who serves as the
        president of the Mountain Meadows Association. ''There's nothing those
        bones could show us that we don't already know from the documentary
        evidence.''

        But others think the bones should have been more exhaustively examined.
        ''Those bones could tell the story and this was their one opportunity,''
        said
        Marian Jacklin, a U.S. Forest Service archaeologist in Cedar City. ''I have
        worked with many of these descendants for years and understand their
        feelings. But as a scientist, I would allow my own mother's bones to be
        studied in a respectful way if it would benefit medicine or history.''

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        Message: 2815
        From: "Anne Frasi"
        Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2000 20:12:14 -0000
        X-Mailing-List: indigenous_peoples_literature@egroups.com
        Subject: [indigenous_peoples_literature] Fw: Black Elk Speaks production scheduled in Ada, OK
        MIME-Version: 1.0
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        Wed, 15 Mar 2000 11:27:12 -0800

        OKIT
        "Black Elk Speaks" production scheduled in Ada"Black Elk Speaks"
        production scheduled in Ada

        ADA, OK - A combined effort of the Chickasaw and Choctaw Nations will bring
        "Black Elk Speaks" to Ada on March 25-27. Performances are scheduled for
        7:30 p.m. Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday, and 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. Monday at East
        Central University's Dorothy Summers Theater.

          Larry Sellers, who played the role of Cloud Dancing on Dr. Quinn, Medicine
        Woman, will portray Black Elk in the play. Sellers, a Native American
        scholar who was chosen as a Fellow at the Newberry Library Center for the
        History of the American Indian, will also serve as historical consultant for
        the production of Black Elk Speaks, just as he did for Dr. Quinn series.

          Emmy nominated actor Casey Camp, television actor Mark Abbott and several
        local actors in the production will join Sellers.

          Noted Native American advocate and actor Wes Studi, of Dances With Wolves,
        serves on the board of Total Integrated Media Entertainment (TIME), who will
        produce the play.

          Black Elk Speaks is based on the John G. Niehardt book of the same name,
        which was drawn from conversations the author had with Oglala Sioux holy man
        Black Elk. The book and play have been hailed as quality literature with an
        important message.

          Vine Deloria Jr., respected Native American Sioux scholar and author of
        Red Earth, White Lies, said, "If any great religious classic has emerged in
        this century or on this continent, it must certainly be judged in the
        company of Black Elk Speaks...The most important aspect of the book, however
        is not its effect on the non-Indian populace...but upon the contemporary
        generation of young Indians who have been aggressively searching for roots
        of their own in the structure of universal reality."

          While young Indians may feel the most important effect of this play, its
        message of the unity of all creation is one bound to have a profound effect
        on all who experience it.

          Tickets for the production are only $2 for elementary through college
        students, and only $4 for adults. For more information or tickets call Gwen
        Seawright at (580) 436-2603, ext. 6475.

          It's T.I.M.E. (Total Integrated Media Entertainment) was founded by a
        group of both Indian and non-Indian actors in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Integrity,
        Honesty, Pride, and Dignity, was the foundation for the organization to
        build on. Television, video and film will be areas of interest the group
        will have as a new focus. Primarily addressing the technical side of the
        industry. Through workshops, they will be able to enhance an interest in the
        technical support part of the entertainment business.

        For more information: 918-836-0600 or email: ndnhurd@....

        ---
        © Copyright 1999-2000 Oklahoma Indian Times, Inc.

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        Message: 2816
        From: "Anne Frasi"
        Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2000 21:00:41 -0000
        X-Mailing-List: indigenous_peoples_literature@egroups.com
        Subject: [indigenous_peoples_literature] No Subject
        MIME-Version: 1.0
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        Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit


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        content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable

        The following is an excerpt, in part, of the reply from Chief Seattle, lead=
        er of the combined Duwamish and Suquwiiish tribes in the Northwest part of =
        the country, to President Franklin Pierce in 1854, when the President made =
        the tribes an offer to buy Indian tribal lands. It is widely considered the=
         most moving and profound statement on the environment ever made. it is sti=
        ll timely in its message to all men.


        "The President in Washington sends word that he wishes to buy our land. But=
         how can you buy or sell the sky? How can you buy or sell the sky, the warm=
        th of the land? The idea is strange to us. If we do not own the freshness o=
        f the air and the sparkle of the water, how can you buy them? Every part of=
         this earth is sacred to my people. Every shining pine needle, every sand s=
        hore, every mist lathe dark woods, every clearing and humming insect is hol=
        y in the memory and experience of my people.


        "We are part of the earth and it is part of us. The perfumed flowers are ou=
        r sisters; the deer, the horse, the great eagle, these are our brothers. Th=
        e rocky crests, the juices in the meadows, the body heat of the pony, and m=
        an...all belong to the same family.. We will consider your offer to buy our=
         land. But it will not be easy. This shining water that moves in the stream=
        s and rivers is not just water, but the blood of our ancestors. The water's=
         murmur is the voice of my father's father. The rivers are my brothers, the=
        y quench our thirst. The rivers carry our canoes and feed our children.


        'We know that the white man does not understand our ways. One portion of th=
        e land is the same to him as the next, for he is a stranger who comes in th=
        e night and takes from the land whatever he needs. The earth is not his bro=
        ther, but his enemy, and when he has conquered it, he moves on. He kidnaps =
        the earth from his children and he does not care. His father's grave and hi=
        s children's birthright are forgotten. He treats his mother, the earth, and=
         his brother, the sky, as things to be bought, plundered, sold like sheep o=
        r bright beads. His appetite will devour the earth and leave behind only de=
        sert.


        "There is no quiet place in the white mm's cities. No place to hear the unf=
        urling of leaves in spring or the rustle of an insect's wings. But perhaps =
        it is because I am a savage and do not understand. The clatter only seems t=
        o insult my ears. And what is there to life if a man cannot hear the lonely=
         cry of the whippoorwill or the arguments of the frogs around a pond at nig=
        ht? I am a red man and do not understand. The Indian prefers the soft sound=
         of the wind darting over the face of a pond and the smell of the wind itse=
        lf, cleansed by a midday rain, or scented with pinion pine.


        'The air is precious to the red man' for all things share the Same breath..=
        .the beast, the tree, the man... they all share the same breath. The white =
        man does not seem to notice the air he breathes. Like a man dying for many =
        days, he is numb to the stench. If we decide to accept (your offer to buy o=
        ur land), I will make one condition....the white man must treat the beasts =
        of this land as his brother. I am a savage and do not understand any other =
        way. I have seen a thousand rotting buffalo on the prairie, left by the whi=
        te man who shot them from a passing train. I am a savage and do not underst=
        and how the smoking Iron Horse can be more important than the buffalo that =
        we will kill only to stay alive.


        'What is man without the beasts? If all the beasts were gone, man would die=
         from a great loneliness of spirit. For whatever happens to the beasts soon=
         happens to man. All things are connected. Whatever befalls the earth, befa=
        lls the sons of the earth. If men spit upon the ground, they spit upon them=
        selves. This we know... all things are connected like the blood which unite=
        s one family. Whatever befalls the earth befalls the sons of the earth. Man=
         did not weave the web of life. He is merely a strand in it. Whatever he do=
        es to the web, he does to himself Even the white man' whose God walks and t=
        alks with him as friend to friend, cannot be exempt from the common destiny=
        . We may be brothers after ~ We shall see. One thing we know, which the whi=
        te man may one day discover...our God is the same God. He is the God of man=
         and His compassion is equal for the red man and the white. This earth is p=
        recious to Him, and to harm the earth is to heap contempt on its Creator.

        'The whites, too, shall pass; perhaps sooner than all tribes. Contaminate y=
        our bed and you will one night suffocate in your own waste. But in perishin=
        g you will shine brightly, fired by the strength of the God who brought you=
         this land and, for some special purpose, gave you dominion over this land =
        and over the red man.


        'This destiny is a mystery to us, for we do not understand when the buffalo=
         are all slaughtered, the wild horses are tamed, and the secret corners of =
        the forest heavy with the scent of many men, and the view of the ripe hills=
         blotted by talking wires. Where is the thicket? Gone. Where is the eagle? =
        Gone: The end of living and the beginning of survival. When the last red ma=
        n has vanished with his wilderness and his memory is only the shadow of a c=
        loud moving across the prairie, will these shores and forests still be here=
        ? Will there be any spirit of my people left? We love this earth as a new-b=
        orn loves its mother's heartbeat. So, if we sell you our land, love it as w=
        e have loved it. Care for it as we have cared for it. Hold in your mind the=
         memory of the land as it is when you receive it. Preserve the land for all=
         children and love it, as God loves it all. As we are part of the land, you=
         too are part of the land. This earth is precious to us. It is also preciou=
        s to you. One thing we know; there is only one God. No man, be he red man o=
        r white man, can be apart. We are brothers after all"


        What was true in 1854 is true in 1996. It is not too late to begin to save =
        Planet Earth. If all people would consider Chief Seattle's touching testame=
        nt to our relationship to this earth, we would treat our Mother with more r=
        espect.


        This was sent to me four years ago by a friend of mine in NJ and I just tho=
        ught it would be nice to share with you.

        In peace

        Anne






        4




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        The following is an excerpt, in part, of the reply from =
        Chief =

        Seattle, leader of the combined Duwamish and Suquwiiish tribes in the North=
        west =

        part of the country, to President Franklin Pierce in 1854, when the Preside=
        nt =

        made the tribes an offer to buy Indian tribal lands. It is widely considere=
        d the =

        most moving and profound statement on the environment ever made. it is stil=
        l =

        timely in its message to all men.

        "The President in Washington sends word that he wishes t=
        o buy =

        our land. But how can you buy or sell the sky? How can you buy or sell the =
        sky, =

        the warmth of the land? The idea is strange to us. If we do not own the =

        freshness of the air and the sparkle of the water, how can you buy them? Ev=
        ery =

        part of this earth is sacred to my people. Every shining pine needle, every=
         sand =

        shore, every mist lathe dark woods, every clearing and humming insect is ho=
        ly in =

        the memory and experience of my people.

        "We are part of the earth and it is part of us. The perf=
        umed =

        flowers are our sisters; the deer, the horse, the great eagle, these are ou=
        r =

        brothers. The rocky crests, the juices in the meadows, the body heat of the=
         =

        pony, and man...all belong to the same family.. We will consider your offer=
         to =

        buy our land. But it will not be easy. This shining water that moves in the=
         =

        streams and rivers is not just water, but the blood of our ancestors. The =

        water's murmur is the voice of my fathers father. The rivers are my =
        brothers, =

        they quench our thirst. The rivers carry our canoes and feed our children.



        'We know that the white man does not understand our ways=
        . One =

        portion of the land is the same to him as the next, f=
        or he =

        is a stranger who comes in the night and takes from the land whatever he ne=
        eds. =

        The earth is not his brother, but his enemy, and when he has conquered it, =
        he =

        moves on. He kidnaps the earth from his children and he does not care. His =

        fathers grave and his children's birthright are forgotten. He treats=
         his =

        mother, the earth, and his brother, the sky, as things to be bought, plunde=
        red, =

        sold like sheep or bright beads. His appetite will devour the earth and lea=
        ve =

        behind only desert.

        "There is no quiet place in the white mm's cities. No pl=
        ace to =

        hear the unfurling of leaves in spring or the rustle of an insect's wings. =
        But =

        perhaps it is because I am a savage and do not understand. The clatter only=
         =

        seems to insult my ears. And what is there to life if a man cannot hear the=
         =

        lonely cry of the whippoorwill or the arguments of the frogs around a pond =
        at =

        night? I am a red man and do not understand. The Indian prefers the soft so=
        und =

        of the wind darting over the face of a pond and the smell of the wind itsel=
        f, =

        cleansed by a midday rain, or scented with pinion pine.

        'The air is precious to the red man' for all things shar=
        e the =

        Same breath...the beast, the tree, the man... they all share the same breat=
        h. =

        The white man does not seem to notice the air he breathes. Like a man dying=
         for =

        many days, he is numb to the stench. If we decide to accept (your offer to =
        buy =

        our land), I will make one condition....the white man must treat the beasts=
         of =

        this land as his brother. I am a savage and do not understand any other way=
        . I =

        have seen a thousand rotting buffalo on the prairie, left by the white man =
        who =

        shot them from a passing train. I am a savage and do not understand how the=
         =

        smoking Iron Horse can be more important than the buffalo that we will kill=
         only =

        to stay alive.

        'What is man without the beasts? If all the beasts were =
        gone, =

        man would die from a great loneliness of spirit. For whatever happens to th=
        e =

        beasts soon happens to man. All things are connected. Whatever befalls the =

        earth, befalls the sons of the earth. If men spit upon the ground, they spi=
        t =

        upon themselves. This we know... all things are connected like the blood wh=
        ich =

        unites one family. Whatever befalls the earth befalls the sons of the earth=
        . Man =

        did not weave the web of life. He is merely a strand in it. Whatever he doe=
        s to =

        the web, he does to himself Even the white man' whose God walks and talks w=
        ith =

        him as friend to friend, cannot be exempt from the common destiny. We may b=
        e =

        brothers after ~ We shall see. One thing we know, which the white man may o=
        ne =

        day discover...our God is the same God. He is the God of man and His compas=
        sion =

        is equal for the red man and the white. This earth is precious to Him, and =
        to =

        harm the earth is to heap contempt on its Creator.
        'The whites, too, shall pass; perhaps sooner than all tr=
        ibes. =

        Contaminate your bed and you will one night suffocate in your own waste. Bu=
        t in =

        perishing you will shine brightly, fired by the strength of the God who bro=
        ught =

        you this land and, for some special purpose, gave you dominion over this la=
        nd =

        and over the red man.

        'This destiny is a mystery to us, for we do not understa=
        nd when =

        the buffalo are all slaughtered, the wild horses are tamed, and the secret =

        corners of the forest heavy with the scent of many men, and the view of the=
         ripe =

        hills blotted by talking wires. Where is the thicket? Gone. Where is the ea=
        gle? =

        Gone: The end of living and the beginning of survival. When the last red ma=
        n has =

        vanished with his wilderness and his memory is only the shadow of a cloud m=
        oving =

        across the prairie, will these shores and forests still be here? Will there=
         be =

        any spirit of my people left? We love this earth as a new-born loves its =

        mother's heartbeat. So, if we sell you our land, love it as we have loved i=
        t. =

        Care for it as we have cared for it. Hold in your mind the memory of the la=
        nd as =

        it is when you receive it. Preserve the land for all children and love it, =
        as =

        God loves it all. As we are part of the land, you too are part of the land.=
         This =

        earth is precious to us. It is also precious to you. One thing we know; the=
        re is =

        only one God. No man, be he red man or white man, can be apart. We are brot=
        hers =

        after all"

        What was true in 1854 is true =

        in 1996. It is not too late to begin to save Planet Earth. If all people wo=
        uld =

        consider Chief Seattle's touching testament to our relationship to this ear=
        th, =

        we would treat our Mother with more respect.

        This was sent to me four years ago by a friend of mine i=
        n NJ =

        and I just thought it would be nice to share with you.
        In peace
        Anne

         
         


























        4




        ------=_NextPart_000_0016_01BF8EC1.86257FA0--





        Message: 2817
        From: "Anne Frasi"
        Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2000 21:09:56 -0000
        X-Mailing-List: indigenous_peoples_literature@egroups.com
        Subject: [indigenous_peoples_literature] Fw: The Fernando Eros Caro case - part 22
        MIME-Version: 1.0
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        Online petition asking for a new trial at:

        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

        The FERNANDO EROS CARO Case
        PART 22 - THE TRIAL

        M3.   Fernando Eros Caro's counsel unreasonably failed to protect his right
        to
                  full and independent consideration of mitigation

        Mr. Caro's trial counsel failed to object, request admonitions, or move for
        mistrial
        following several instances of misconduct and error on the part of the
        prosecutor
        and the judge.



        M4.   Fernando Eros Caro's trial jury failed and refused to fully consider
        and give
                  independent weight to the evidence presented in mitigation of
        sentence, and
                  was misled by the misconduct of the prosecutor and the errors of
        the trial
                  court in its understanding of its sentencing responsibilities

        Jury misconduct is prejudicial per se and requires reversal. Those errors
        of the
        jury attributable to the misconduct and errors of the prosecutor, trial
        court, and trial
        counsel demonstrate that those errors by the key participants in the trial
        were
        actually prejudicial.

        Many of the jurors at Mr. Caro's penalty phase did not want to discuss or
        consider
        mitigating evidence such as Mr. Caro's upbringing, psychiatric and
        sociological
        problems prior to deciding the case. The penalty phase jury took a vote
        immediately
        upon beginning deliberations; only one juror voted for life.

        The jurors made up their minds prior to deliberations. The general attitude
        among
        court personnel and jurors during the penalty trial, prior to
        deliberations, was that
        Fernando Eros Caro should receive the death penalty.

        Although the jury found the allegations of two prior murders not proven,
        the jurors
        nonetheless took those allegations into account in deciding penalty. They
        decided
        that a death sentence would guarantee Mr. Caro would remain in prison, and
        improperly and without factual foundation decided that he should be
        released if
        sentenced to life without possibility of parole.

        The jurors further believed the law made it a mathematical certainty that a
        death
        sentence was required. They felt they were not permitted to consider
        "emotional"
        factors related to Mr. Caro in deciding sentence.

        The penalty determination is fatally flawed.


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        Message: 2818
        From: "Anne Frasi"
        Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2000 22:07:06 -0000
        X-Mailing-List: indigenous_peoples_literature@egroups.com
        Subject: [indigenous_peoples_literature] Fw:  Grass Roots Oyate of Pine Ridge
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        Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

        This message has been truncated due its extreme size.
        Read it online at the following location:
        http://www.egroups.com/group/indigenous_peoples_literature/2818.html?
         



        Message: 2819
        Date: Thu, 16 Mar 2000 04:38:28 -0800
        From: "Glenn Welker"
        X-Mailing-List: indigenous_peoples_literature@egroups.com
        Subject: [indigenous_peoples_literature] Please Help My Father (Possible Relative of Sequoya) fwd
        MIME-Version: 1.0
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        Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

        Dear Glenn,

        Thank you for helping me.  I really do not know how to do Native
        American
        research.  I have been told that if I don't get papers filed that the
        rolls will be closed.  Also, that I
        must fill out the papers in a particular way or they will be thrown
        out.  Also, I have been told that I
        can send the papers in with "still researching" written on them so I
        will still beable to apply when all
        the rolls are closed.  Is this true?  I want to do this for my father.
        He is the only one left in his
        family.  He is getting very elderly, however he has a good mind.  He is
        definately part Cherokee,
        however, his father died when he was 2 years old and his mother died
        when he was about 12 years
        old.  I have tried to find my father's family for him since I was 12
        years old.  The records -
        forinstance, his birthcertificate is one the U.S. Army came up with
        when he joined the Army during
        WWII.  They found one without a name on it and had Lawrence Lane typed
        in where the name
        went.  Race says white.  The U.S. army filled out his honorable
        discharge also and it says he is
        blonde headed, blue eyes, 5'7" tall, weighs 145 lbs. and race is white.
         My dad would have to been
        over twice to make a shadow at 145 pounds.  He has the beautiful
        blue/black hair and golden skin
        of his Native heritage, stands 6'2" tall.  The U.S. Army will not
        correct the mess they have made of
        his records.  He was shot, tripped over a granade launcher, but did not
        fall.  He served his country
        well in the India, Burma, China theatre.  They will not give him a
        purple heart, however they give
        him partial disabiliy.  This is a thorne in my side.  Anyway, to make
        matters worse, his brother,
        Osker Lane gave the information for my father's mother' s death
        certificate.  Every space was the
        same, "unknown".  Now he knew all the info about his mother.  Her death
        certificate is a mess with
        strike outs and add ins.  His brother Osker did not even go to his
        mother's funeral.  From the time
        my dad was12 years old, he was a street kid - he survived, slept in
        parked cars - a hellish
        nightmare for a 12 year old.  I know this happens a lot.
         
        I do have a death certificate of his mother's sister.  It says she is
        Am. Indian/white and I have her
        estate papers, she died without a will therefore her esate was divided
        among her bros and sisters
        and the ones that had died before her, there children were listed.  It
        is a legal document and has my
        Dads name in it.  I realize I need more documentation.  Would a
        statement from my dad stating his
        mother was part Cherokee be considered evidence along with his aunt's
        death certificate?
         
        I can document his family way back.  Sequi way back.  I thought Sequoya
        might be related since
        he lived in the area where Lucy Fly was born in 1803.   However, the
        more I research the more I
        know that is not the correct link.  Lucy Fly was a full blood Cherokee.
         It appears that her family
        could have been part of the Georgia (Walker Co.) Indians.  Her father -
        Elisha Fly or Eljay, her
        mother possibly Elizabeth Reed.  I know there was an Indian Chief named
        William Reed that went
        back and forth into Indian Territory.  However, I do not know anything
        else about this person.  It is
        possible that he was involved in the Cumberland Gap treaty.  Lucy was
        born where Walker Co.
        Ga. bordered on Williamson Co., Tenn.  She married William Capps whose
        sons Pleasant B.
        Robertson Capps lived in Deware, Oklahoma.  Other Indians were
        Vandalia, I am not sure what
        that means in Cherokee, and the other was Lemi born along the Haw
        River, Orange Co., N.C.  He
        became Lemuel Stout.
         
        I know a person named Terry Townley who lives in Houston, Missouri has
        a degree of Blood
        card, mainly through his father who was a full blood cherokee as well
        as his paternal grandparents.
        Terry had a Cherokee helping him because his mother is a Capps.
        Perhaps this person's name was
        Myonma?  Anyway the help was because of the Capps name.  I do not know
        why people go nuts
        and will not help others.  My father and I are the only ones that are
        familiar with names to look for
        and I did give that info to Terry Townley, however, the communication
        is now closed between us.
        I feel bad about this cut off, especially since this person is related
        to my dad's Uncle.  But things
        like that happen.  According to my records, Lucy's parents were
        Chicamonga Cherokees.
        Supposedly her father and her father's brother  (Elisha? and Jeremiah
        Fly had Indian Roll numbers.
        They both died in the 1840's.
         
        Can you share with me what I need to do next?  I want so bad to find
        this connection for my
        father.  It means so much to him.  He deserves to have a family.
         
        I hope I have not offended you by asking so many questions.  I want to
        do this correctly and I am
        afraid I will botch it up if I don't get guidence and help.

        Most Sincerely,

        Joyce Ford
        w.o.ford@...







        Message: 2820
        From: "Anne Frasi"
        Date: Thu, 16 Mar 2000 07:08:40 -0000
        X-Mailing-List: indigenous_peoples_literature@egroups.com
        Subject: [indigenous_peoples_literature] Fw: Initiative Against Economic Globalization - Prague 2000
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        ----- SORRY FOR CROSSPOSTING
        Please spread this call worldwide


        Initiative Against Economic Globalization - Prague 2000

        Join the campaign against IMF/WB summit in Prague, September 25 - 28, 2000.
        We need your support for the continuing struggle for global justice!!!


        Some 20,000 representatives of global capital (world bankers, economists
        and financiers) are expected to come to Prague in September to attend the
        55th annual summit of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank
        Group. This prestigious meeting of the world economic elite, the first of
        its kind in the Central and Eastern Europe, will definitely be of a great
        importance. The delegates will meet to propose a scheme of further
        liberalization of the world economy by defining new loan priorities and
        structural adjustment conditions.

        The events in Seattle at the WTO meeting last November showed that a huge
        wave of global resistance is rising against the expanding power of global
        capital. The IMF/WB summit in Prague will be our next big opportunity to
        express our demands for global justice.
        The Initiative Against Economic Globalization (INPEG) is a loose coalition
        of various Czech environmental, human rights and autonomist/anarchist
        groups, organizations and individuals who are ready to stand up critically
        against the summit of the world financial oligarchy. INPEG has been meeting
        regularly in Prague since last summer. It has planned a series of campaigns
        that will culminate in ten days of activities starting on September 20.
        Non-violent demonstrations, info campaigns, and the Festival of Art and
        Resistance includinga counter summit will be the main resistance activities
        in the mentioned period.

        We will be exposing the links between the IMF/WB, the WTO and transnational
        corporations and the ways how they work to maximize private profits and
        limit the power of people to protect the environment, determine their
        economic destiny, and safeguard their human rights. They are also directly
        responsible for the third world debt. Even their debt relief  policy
        continues under the harsh conditions of the IMF Structural Adjustment
        Progra

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