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[IH CUB LoBoy Numbered Series] Re: Dragging logs

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  • FrankenCub
    I definitely gotta agree with poor visibility, even the sides are limited because of the arms. I could get a lot of use out of one but even in the woods one
    Message 1 of 29 , May 21, 2013
      I definitely gotta agree with poor visibility, even the sides are limited because of the arms. I could get a lot of use out of one but even in the woods one would be prone to getting hung up. I have seen a couple in videos skidding small logs but it was with a grapple on the front and there's no way I'd want to be looking backwards all the way out ! The few I did see cheap, in a relative sense, were old IH units with out a ROPS cab and I won't use one of those anywhere but flat land. I've operated plenty of Case and Bobcat skid steers and have had them in pretty funky places that made me feel not so good lmao. One guy I worked with slid a Case off a trailer while loading it in the rain, damn good thing for the ROPS cab and seat belts !

      --- In ihcubloboyseries@yahoogroups.com, Mike <mikesloane@...> wrote:
      >
      > I don't think that a skid steer is designed for towing. Plus every one
      > that I have ever operated have extremely limited vision in back. They
      > are great machines for doing some kinds of work, but I don't think that
      > log skidding is one of them.
      >
      > The other problem is that a skid steer in decent condition is going to
      > cost you way more than an old tractor.
      >
      > Mike
      >
      > On 5/20/2013 4:37 PM, FrankenCub wrote:
      > > The thought had crossed my mind when I saw a couple old beaters lol.
      > > Would be an expensive proposition though once the machine is gotten
      > > in order and tracks put on. You are right though...I can see so so
      > > many good uses for one :-D
    • James P. Williams
      If I was going to buy one for that application, I would go with something like a 284, it’s available in diesel or gas, plus after 1982, they had 4x4 on them,
      Message 2 of 29 , May 21, 2013
        If I was going to buy one for that application, I would go with something like a 284, it’s available in diesel or gas, plus after 1982, they had 4x4 on them, much stronger clutch, and still compact enough to get into tighter spaces.
         
        Just my opinion on it.
         
        Sent: Tuesday, May 21, 2013 18:14
        Subject: [IH CUB LoBoy Numbered Series] Re: Dragging logs
         
         

        I definitely gotta agree with poor visibility, even the sides are limited because of the arms. I could get a lot of use out of one but even in the woods one would be prone to getting hung up. I have seen a couple in videos skidding small logs but it was with a grapple on the front and there's no way I'd want to be looking backwards all the way out ! The few I did see cheap, in a relative sense, were old IH units with out a ROPS cab and I won't use one of those anywhere but flat land. I've operated plenty of Case and Bobcat skid steers and have had them in pretty funky places that made me feel not so good lmao. One guy I worked with slid a Case off a trailer while loading it in the rain, damn good thing for the ROPS cab and seat belts !

        --- In mailto:ihcubloboyseries%40yahoogroups.com, Mike <mikesloane@...> wrote:

        >
        > I don't think that a skid
        steer is designed for towing. Plus every one
        > that I have ever operated
        have extremely limited vision in back. They
        > are great machines for doing
        some kinds of work, but I don't think that
        > log skidding is one of
        them.
        >
        > The other problem is that a skid steer in decent
        condition is going to
        > cost you way more than an old tractor.
        >
        > Mike
        >
        > On 5/20/2013 4:37 PM, FrankenCub wrote:
        > > The thought had crossed my mind when I saw a couple old beaters
        lol.
        > > Would be an expensive proposition though once the machine is
        gotten
        > > in order and tracks put on. You are right though...I can see
        so so
        > > many good uses for one :-D

      • James P. Williams
        Or even a 254, but the 284 is much stronger clutchwise. From: FrankenCub Sent: Tuesday, May 21, 2013 18:14 To: ihcubloboyseries@yahoogroups.com Subject: [IH
        Message 3 of 29 , May 21, 2013
          Or even a 254, but the 284 is much stronger clutchwise.
           
          Sent: Tuesday, May 21, 2013 18:14
          Subject: [IH CUB LoBoy Numbered Series] Re: Dragging logs
           
           

          I definitely gotta agree with poor visibility, even the sides are limited because of the arms. I could get a lot of use out of one but even in the woods one would be prone to getting hung up. I have seen a couple in videos skidding small logs but it was with a grapple on the front and there's no way I'd want to be looking backwards all the way out ! The few I did see cheap, in a relative sense, were old IH units with out a ROPS cab and I won't use one of those anywhere but flat land. I've operated plenty of Case and Bobcat skid steers and have had them in pretty funky places that made me feel not so good lmao. One guy I worked with slid a Case off a trailer while loading it in the rain, damn good thing for the ROPS cab and seat belts !

          --- In mailto:ihcubloboyseries%40yahoogroups.com, Mike <mikesloane@...> wrote:

          >
          > I don't think that a skid
          steer is designed for towing. Plus every one
          > that I have ever operated
          have extremely limited vision in back. They
          > are great machines for doing
          some kinds of work, but I don't think that
          > log skidding is one of
          them.
          >
          > The other problem is that a skid steer in decent
          condition is going to
          > cost you way more than an old tractor.
          >
          > Mike
          >
          > On 5/20/2013 4:37 PM, FrankenCub wrote:
          > > The thought had crossed my mind when I saw a couple old beaters
          lol.
          > > Would be an expensive proposition though once the machine is
          gotten
          > > in order and tracks put on. You are right though...I can see
          so so
          > > many good uses for one :-D

        • FrankenCub
          There s a guy near me who has one of those, really nice machine. Uses it just to mow his lawn. Way out of my price range though. They usually bring $3500+
          Message 4 of 29 , May 23, 2013
            There's a guy near me who has one of those, really nice machine. Uses it just to mow his lawn. Way out of my price range though. They usually bring $3500+ here.

            On the poor clutch issue, can the 154 clutch be upgraded to what is used on the 184 ? There's a 154 down the road from me that I don't think I should pass up due to the price. Very respectable condition with the snow thrower, snow blade, and a mower deck...that does need help though, not bad enough I can't save it. Tires all like new and supposed to run like new.

            --- In ihcubloboyseries@yahoogroups.com, "James P. Williams" <jpw19798@...> wrote:
            >
            > If I was going to buy one for that application, I would go with something like a 284, it’s available in diesel or gas, plus after 1982, they had 4x4 on them, much stronger clutch, and still compact enough to get into tighter spaces.
            >
            > Just my opinion on it.
          • fastforklift1
            I m a bit late in responding, but I ve been dragging logs with my 184 and it is amazing. I mounted a Ramsey 8000lb winch on the 3 point hitch for pulling them
            Message 5 of 29 , Apr 6, 2014


            I'm a bit late in responding, but I've been dragging logs with my 184 and it is amazing.  I mounted a Ramsey 8000lb winch on the 3 point hitch for pulling them out of the inaccessable places, then pull them up close, getting the butt off the ground.  I have skidded logs that, I'm sure outweighs the tractor.  Only had the front end come off the ground once, but I don't think flipping over backwards is much of a concern.  The log would be on the ground with the front wheels a few inches of the ground. I've also heard of the Fords flipping over, so I've been very careful.  I think the majority of the force is exerted below the rear axle, making it more stable.  See the attached picture, with the chains and the weight of the logs on the 3 point, I've dragged big logs up some logging trails in the woods that had pretty good slope.  I call it the little skidder that could.

            Tom

             

          • northcreek2624
            Yeah...A guy with a 184 told me that of all his tractors he preferred using the 184 for log skidding because it didn t sink in and rut up the trails like the
            Message 6 of 29 , Apr 6, 2014
              Yeah...A guy with a 184 told me that of all his tractors he preferred using the 184 for log skidding because it didn't sink in and rut up the trails like the heavier machines...Mike.
            • fastforklift1
              I agree with that. They don t call them flotation tires for nothing.
              Message 7 of 29 , Apr 13, 2014
                I agree with that.  They don't call them flotation tires for nothing.
              • Dh
                My only caution would be when pulling heavy objects like logs or scraper blades, the rear frame does not have a lot of steel to mount to the transaxle , I have
                Message 8 of 29 , Apr 14, 2014
                  My only caution would be when pulling heavy objects like logs or scraper blades, the rear frame does not have a lot of steel to mount to the transaxle , I have seen several crack and torn holes on the top rear mounts, check them and do not overload the little tractors

                  Dave Hull Sent from my iPhone
                • fastforklift1
                  True, mine was broke when I bought it. It didn t have a 3 point hitch on it at the time and was only used for mowing. This was a definite weak spot on these
                  Message 9 of 29 , Apr 18, 2014
                    True, mine was broke when I bought it. It didn't have a 3 point hitch on it at the time and was only used for mowing.  This was a definite weak spot on these tractors. I vee'd out the break and welded it.  About a year later it broke again.  I plated it and used a longer bolt and had no trouble since. 
                  • northcreek2624
                    Yeah.. and the 184 frame was even beefed up a little from the earlier tractors. I always thought IH did a great job in modernizing a 1940 s tractor but, I have
                    Message 10 of 29 , Apr 19, 2014

                      Yeah.. and the 184 frame was even beefed up a little from the earlier tractors. I always thought IH did a great job in modernizing a 1940's tractor but, I have to wonder what they where thinking in the way they attached the frame to the transaxle. That part always looked "barn  jobbed" to me.

                        There probably should have been a casting piece for the transition but, they were no doubt cost conscious with all the CUT competition coming into play....Mike.

                    • FirstVette
                      There s a pin connection for the belly mower, low/under the Axel and forward of the 3pt hitch. I d weld-up a skid cradle to winch my logs into mounted to them,
                      Message 11 of 29 , Mar 28, 2015

                        There's a pin connection for the belly mower, low/under the Axel and forward of the 3pt hitch. I'd weld-up a skid cradle to winch my logs into mounted to them, with forward extensions so I could use the Mower Lift hydraulics to raise them off the ground a little for dragging. Guaranteed never to lift your front wheels.

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