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Radiator Wanted

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  • Jeffrey
    Well, I ve put this off long enough....do any of you have a good used radiator for sale or know where I can purchase one for my 71 154? Thanks! Jeff
    Message 1 of 7 , Feb 22, 2011
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      Well, I've put this off long enough....do any of you have a good used radiator for sale or know where I can purchase one for my '71 154?

      Thanks!

      Jeff
      backacres1@...
      please include pics...
    • njdale2000
      Jeff, For my 2 cents - If it was me, I would look around for a local radiator shop that can do re-cores and take your current radiator to them for an
      Message 2 of 7 , Feb 22, 2011
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        Jeff,

        For my 2 cents - If it was me, I would look around for a local radiator shop that can do 're-cores' and take your current radiator to them for an inspection and estimate on re-coring it. Usually the copper tanks do not go bad because the copper is much thicker in the tanks than in the tubes.

        If you buy a used one, chances are that the tubes are going to be worn almost as thin as the ones that you currently own, and in a little while you will be facing the same issue all over again.

        Personally, I would rather trust a local guy than trust anything that comes out of China. (been burned too many times with Chinese 'junk') I would suspect that the Chinese radiators that are offered on the internet are probably 'paper thin'. Copper is expensive and the Chinese will cheat on its thickness to save (keep) the money. --- I couldn't believe it; but, not long ago my grandson's power charger for his laptop stopped working. I took a volt meter and checked it out - the transformer was OK; but, the 110 volt power cord was bad. It was marked as being made in China and was marked 18 gauge. When I cut the cord in two, the 18 gauge turned out to be 3 strands of copper about the thickness of a human hair - all the rest was just vinyl insulation (no wonder it burned out).

        Good luck with your radiator project, NJDale
      • j-cottom
        All due respect to njdale2000, Chinese goods are made cheaply only when that is the level of quality requested of them by western companies. Apple Computers
        Message 3 of 7 , Feb 22, 2011
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          All due respect to njdale2000, Chinese goods are made cheaply only when that is the level of quality requested of them by western companies.

          Apple Computers are fantastic. Assembled in China in factories with high standards.

          --- In ihcubloboyseries@yahoogroups.com, "njdale2000" <dalesargent@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > Jeff,
          >
          > For my 2 cents - If it was me, I would look around for a local radiator shop that can do 're-cores' and take your current radiator to them for an inspection and estimate on re-coring it. Usually the copper tanks do not go bad because the copper is much thicker in the tanks than in the tubes.
          >
          > If you buy a used one, chances are that the tubes are going to be worn almost as thin as the ones that you currently own, and in a little while you will be facing the same issue all over again.
          >
          > Personally, I would rather trust a local guy than trust anything that comes out of China. (been burned too many times with Chinese 'junk') I would suspect that the Chinese radiators that are offered on the internet are probably 'paper thin'. Copper is expensive and the Chinese will cheat on its thickness to save (keep) the money. --- I couldn't believe it; but, not long ago my grandson's power charger for his laptop stopped working. I took a volt meter and checked it out - the transformer was OK; but, the 110 volt power cord was bad. It was marked as being made in China and was marked 18 gauge. When I cut the cord in two, the 18 gauge turned out to be 3 strands of copper about the thickness of a human hair - all the rest was just vinyl insulation (no wonder it burned out).
          >
          > Good luck with your radiator project, NJDale
          >
        • Mike Sloane
          Yes, it is true that you can get products made in the PRC that are a good as any, but they will then cost as much as any. The problem with radiators is that
          Message 4 of 7 , Feb 22, 2011
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            Yes, it is true that you can get products made in the PRC that are a
            good as any, but they will then cost as much as any.

            The problem with radiators is that very few Americans are willing to pay
            the current price of a brand new replacement radiator that is equal to
            the quality of the IH OEM radiator. As Dale pointed out, the best choice
            is almost always to have the old radiator re-cored by a local radiator
            shop. What they do is unsolder the old tank and bottom (and the frame,
            if there is one) and solder them to a new core. Even at that, my local
            radiator guy told me that the new cores have a copper thickness thinner
            than the film you used to have in your cameras before digital came
            along. This is both Good News and Bad News - thinner wall thickness
            means more effective heat transfer, but it also means it is a lot more
            fragile. Your repaired/replacement radiator will be a lot lighter than
            the old one.

            And, as Dale mentioned, this seems to be true of most tractor
            replacement parts from Asia. I have been restoring old farm tractors for
            about 40 years, and it seems that my biggest problems come from trying
            to use Asian import parts (not just on IH Cub/Loboy tractors). That is
            why I am willing to pay extra for a good old Made in USA/Canada parts -
            they don't let me down the way the imports do. I stay away from
            Valu-Bilt, Tisco, TSC, etc., all of whom peddle the cheapest stuff they
            can get their hands on. I stick with Case IH, NAPA, or TM Tractor Parts,
            etc.

            Mike

            On 2/22/2011 1:17 PM, j-cottom wrote:
            >
            > All due respect to njdale2000, Chinese goods are made cheaply only when
            > that is the level of quality requested of them by western companies.
            >
            > Apple Computers are fantastic. Assembled in China in factories with high
            > standards.
            >
            > --- In ihcubloboyseries@yahoogroups.com
            > <mailto:ihcubloboyseries%40yahoogroups.com>, "njdale2000"
            > <dalesargent@...> wrote:
            > >
            > >
            > > Jeff,
            > >
            > > For my 2 cents - If it was me, I would look around for a local
            > radiator shop that can do 're-cores' and take your current radiator to
            > them for an inspection and estimate on re-coring it. Usually the copper
            > tanks do not go bad because the copper is much thicker in the tanks than
            > in the tubes.
            > >
            > > If you buy a used one, chances are that the tubes are going to be
            > worn almost as thin as the ones that you currently own, and in a little
            > while you will be facing the same issue all over again.
            > >
            > > Personally, I would rather trust a local guy than trust anything that
            > comes out of China. (been burned too many times with Chinese 'junk') I
            > would suspect that the Chinese radiators that are offered on the
            > internet are probably 'paper thin'. Copper is expensive and the Chinese
            > will cheat on its thickness to save (keep) the money. --- I couldn't
            > believe it; but, not long ago my grandson's power charger for his laptop
            > stopped working. I took a volt meter and checked it out - the
            > transformer was OK; but, the 110 volt power cord was bad. It was marked
            > as being made in China and was marked 18 gauge. When I cut the cord in
            > two, the 18 gauge turned out to be 3 strands of copper about the
            > thickness of a human hair - all the rest was just vinyl insulation (no
            > wonder it burned out).
            > >
            > > Good luck with your radiator project, NJDale
          • Jeffrey
            Dale, Thanks for the tips...to be honest with you I hadn t thought of that. I ll certainly start making some phone calls... Best Regards, Jeff
            Message 5 of 7 , Mar 1 4:13 PM
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              Dale,

              Thanks for the tips...to be honest with you I hadn't thought of that. I'll certainly start making some phone calls...

              Best Regards,

              Jeff

              --- In ihcubloboyseries@yahoogroups.com, "njdale2000" <dalesargent@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > Jeff,
              >
              > For my 2 cents - If it was me, I would look around for a local radiator shop that can do 're-cores' and take your current radiator to them for an inspection and estimate on re-coring it. Usually the copper tanks do not go bad because the copper is much thicker in the tanks than in the tubes.
              >
              > If you buy a used one, chances are that the tubes are going to be worn almost as thin as the ones that you currently own, and in a little while you will be facing the same issue all over again.
              >
              > Personally, I would rather trust a local guy than trust anything that comes out of China. (been burned too many times with Chinese 'junk') I would suspect that the Chinese radiators that are offered on the internet are probably 'paper thin'. Copper is expensive and the Chinese will cheat on its thickness to save (keep) the money. --- I couldn't believe it; but, not long ago my grandson's power charger for his laptop stopped working. I took a volt meter and checked it out - the transformer was OK; but, the 110 volt power cord was bad. It was marked as being made in China and was marked 18 gauge. When I cut the cord in two, the 18 gauge turned out to be 3 strands of copper about the thickness of a human hair - all the rest was just vinyl insulation (no wonder it burned out).
              >
              > Good luck with your radiator project, NJDale
              >
            • Kent Morris
              For a price reference, I have had two 154 radiators re-cored. In 2008, $285. In 2010, $375. It may sound like a lot of money, but you end up with a new
              Message 6 of 7 , Mar 1 8:32 PM
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                For a price reference, I have had two 154 radiators re-cored. In 2008, $285. In 2010, $375. It may sound like a lot of money, but you end up with a new radiator. If I remember correctly, half the cost was the core and half shop work.
                Kent

                On Tue, Mar 1, 2011 at 6:13 PM, Jeffrey <backacres1@...> wrote:
                 

                Dale,

                Thanks for the tips...to be honest with you I hadn't thought of that. I'll certainly start making some phone calls...

                Best Regards,

                Jeff

                --- In ihcubloboyseries@yahoogroups.com, "njdale2000" <dalesargent@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                > Jeff,
                >
                > For my 2 cents - If it was me, I would look around for a local radiator shop that can do 're-cores' and take your current radiator to them for an inspection and estimate on re-coring it. Usually the copper tanks do not go bad because the copper is much thicker in the tanks than in the tubes.
                >
                > If you buy a used one, chances are that the tubes are going to be worn almost as thin as the ones that you currently own, and in a little while you will be facing the same issue all over again.
                >
                > Personally, I would rather trust a local guy than trust anything that comes out of China. (been burned too many times with Chinese 'junk') I would suspect that the Chinese radiators that are offered on the internet are probably 'paper thin'. Copper is expensive and the Chinese will cheat on its thickness to save (keep) the money. --- I couldn't believe it; but, not long ago my grandson's power charger for his laptop stopped working. I took a volt meter and checked it out - the transformer was OK; but, the 110 volt power cord was bad. It was marked as being made in China and was marked 18 gauge. When I cut the cord in two, the 18 gauge turned out to be 3 strands of copper about the thickness of a human hair - all the rest was just vinyl insulation (no wonder it burned out).
                >
                > Good luck with your radiator project, NJDale
                >


              • Brad Stogsdill
                Hi- I orderd a new radiator from WENGERS but the morons did not package it properly  and it was damaged.in shipment.  They set me up a return authorization
                Message 7 of 7 , Mar 3 11:25 AM
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                  Hi-
                   
                  I orderd a new radiator from WENGERS but the morons did not package it properly  and it was damaged.in shipment.  They set me up a return authorization and shipped  me a second one which was also damaged during shipment so I gave up and cut off the two dmamged cores and capped them with solder and installed it.
                   
                  Yes I think it may not be he same quality as a new old one was , but on somthing 50 years old, sometimes the old stuff gets too deteriorated to rebuild. which is what happened to mine.  It was just wore out and top cap was coming apart at the seams...not enough good metal to work with it was cracking on the entire seam accross the top.
                   
                  Actually- if you recore a radiator, you do you not end up with a new radiator- just new cores and old end caps...assuming they are still good.
                  Good luck with it!
                   
                  Regards,
                  Bradley
                   

                   


                  From: Kent Morris <kmokgm@...>
                  To: ihcubloboyseries@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Tue, March 1, 2011 10:32:46 PM
                  Subject: Re: [IH CUB LoBoy Numbered Series] Re: Radiator Wanted

                   

                  For a price reference, I have had two 154 radiators re-cored. In 2008, $285. In 2010, $375. It may sound like a lot of money, but you end up with a new radiator. If I remember correctly, half the cost was the core and half shop work.
                  Kent

                  On Tue, Mar 1, 2011 at 6:13 PM, Jeffrey <backacres1@...> wrote:
                   

                  Dale,

                  Thanks for the tips...to be honest with you I hadn't thought of that. I'll certainly start making some phone calls...

                  Best Regards,

                  Jeff

                  --- In ihcubloboyseries@yahoogroups.com, "njdale2000" <dalesargent@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > Jeff,
                  >
                  > For my 2 cents - If it was me, I would look around for a local radiator shop that can do 're-cores' and take your current radiator to them for an inspection and estimate on re-coring it. Usually the copper tanks do not go bad because the copper is much thicker in the tanks than in the tubes.
                  >
                  > If you buy a used one, chances are that the tubes are going to be worn almost as thin as the ones that you currently own, and in a little while you will be facing the same issue all over again.
                  >
                  > Personally, I would rather trust a local guy than trust anything that comes out of China. (been burned too many times with Chinese 'junk') I would suspect that the Chinese radiators that are offered on the internet are probably 'paper thin'. Copper is expensive and the Chinese will cheat on its thickness to save (keep) the money. --- I couldn't believe it; but, not long ago my grandson's power charger for his laptop stopped working. I took a volt meter and checked it out - the transformer was OK; but, the 110 volt power cord was bad. It was marked as being made in China and was marked 18 gauge. When I cut the cord in two, the 18 gauge turned out to be 3 strands of copper about the thickness of a human hair - all the rest was just vinyl insulation (no wonder it burned out).
                  >
                  > Good luck with your radiator project, NJDale
                  >



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