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cost to rebuild a 184

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  • bobbycurious184
    I have a 79 184 and it needs some tlc. anyone have any experience on how much it would cost to have someone rebuilt it or even the cost of the parts to do
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 6, 2008
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      I have a '79 184 and it needs some tlc. anyone have any experience on
      how much it would cost to have someone rebuilt it or even the cost of
      the parts to do so? thanks
      bob
    • Mike Sloane
      The term rebuild covers a very wide range of activities, and we would need to know more details before venturing any guesses. The choices range from a
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 6, 2008
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        The term "rebuild" covers a very wide range of activities, and we would
        need to know more details before venturing any guesses. The choices
        range from a "Sherwin-Williams rebuild" (a gallon of paint applied with
        a 4" brush) to a complete tear-down and re-assembly with new internal
        parts and professionally applied paint and decals. The former would only
        cost a few dollars, while the latter would cost more than what you paid
        for the tractor.

        The most common issues with the 184 are: leaking rear main seal, worn
        rings, worn clutch, leaking rear axles, and sloppy steering. None of
        those things by themselves are very expensive if you fix them yourself.
        If you have someone do it for you, then you start to get into real
        money, depending on what the going labor rate is in your area. For
        instance, it takes me about a day to replace the $10 rear main seal in a
        184, but I am old and work slowly.

        Tell us more about what you think needs to be fixed.

        Mike

        bobbycurious184 wrote:
        >
        >
        > I have a '79 184 and it needs some tlc. anyone have any experience on
        > how much it would cost to have someone rebuilt it or even the cost of
        > the parts to do so? thanks
        > bob
        >
      • bobbycurious@aol.com
        well, i m a novice and i love the idea of learning how to do all the repairs myself, but with a 1 year old boy running around it doesn t leave me much time
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 6, 2008
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          well, i'm a novice and i love the idea of learning how to do all the repairs myself, but with a 1 year old boy running around it doesn't leave me much time to learn.  i realize that the name of the game with these 184's tractors is that you are constantly repairing something. if i'm able to get thru a mow of my trails on 13 acres of land, i feel lucky.  i think i need to rebuild the carb (how hard is that?) and or fix the radiator, due to the fact that it's running poorly (sometimes it will only run with the choke fully engaged). it doesn't really smoke when running, but it has some oil leaking off the front of the engine, not a lot, but it's noticeable after a good mow. so i guess i was mostly looking at a "rebuild" to get ahead of the game and prevent all the future breakdowns.  the tractor came "free" with the cabin i bought, and after looking at the price of new compact tractors, i feel it's the morally right and respectful thing to do to refurbish this classic tractor.  i have a retired gentleman in the area that said he could do a rebuld over the winter, and when asked how much it would cost, he said what he usually says whenever asked about the cost of a repair, "more than a fella would want."  again, i would love to at least try a tuneup (replace the sparks, etc.) and rebuilding the carb myself ( i have the kit) - i have all the manuals, but it's a matter of time management for me.  thanks again
          bob
           
          In a message dated 7/6/2008 9:39:49 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time, mikesloane@... writes:

          The term "rebuild" covers a very wide range of activities, and we would
          need to know more details before venturing any guesses. The choices
          range from a "Sherwin-Williams rebuild" (a gallon of paint applied with
          a 4" brush) to a complete tear-down and re-assembly with new internal
          parts and professionally applied paint and decals. The former would only
          cost a few dollars, while the latter would cost more than what you paid
          for the tractor.

          The most common issues with the 184 are: leaking rear main seal, worn
          rings, worn clutch, leaking rear axles, and sloppy steering. None of
          those things by themselves are very expensive if you fix them yourself.
          If you have someone do it for you, then you start to get into real
          money, depending on what the going labor rate is in your area. For
          instance, it takes me about a day to replace the $10 rear main seal in a
          184, but I am old and work slowly.

          Tell us more about what you think needs to be fixed.

          Mike

          bobbycurious184 wrote:
          >
          >
          > I have a '79 184 and it needs some tlc. anyone have any experience on
          > how much it would cost to have someone rebuilt it or even the cost of
          > the parts to do so? thanks
          > bob
          >





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        • Mike Sloane
          ... I don t agree. While some machines need more attention than others, most of my 15 tractors (varying in size from little Wheelhorse through Farmall 560),
          Message 4 of 4 , Jul 6, 2008
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            bobbycurious@... wrote:
            >
            >
            > well, i'm a novice and i love the idea of learning how to do all the
            > repairs myself, but with a 1 year old boy running around it doesn't
            > leave me much time to learn. i realize that the name of the game
            > with these 184's tractors is that you are constantly repairing
            > something.
            I don't agree. While some machines need more attention than others, most
            of my 15 tractors (varying in size from little Wheelhorse through
            Farmall 560), need no attention at all. And my 184 just keeps on going,
            season after season.

            > if i'm able to get thru a mow of my trails on 13 acres of
            > land, i feel lucky.
            Assuming you aren't using your tractor as a brush cutter, it should have
            no problem. I used to cut about 5 acres of grass every weekend with
            mine. (I have cut back some due to the price of gasoline.)

            > i think i need to rebuild the carb (how hard is
            > that?)
            Very easy, just use the right size screwdrivers and wrenches, especially
            on the brass parts. Keep everything clean and in order.

            > and or fix the radiator,
            Fix the radiator? Does it leak?

            > due to the fact that it's running poorly
            > (sometimes it will only run with the choke fully engaged). it doesn't
            > really smoke when running, but it has some oil leaking off the front of
            > the engine, not a lot, but it's noticeable after a good mow.
            Unfortunately, replacing the front crank seal isn't one of the easier
            repairs. If that is the worst problem you have, I would ignore it.
            Generally, if an engine will only run run with the choke out, it is
            because there is either a vacuum leak or blockage in the carburetor.
            Overhauling the carburetor will likely help, but there may be other
            problems that aren't too difficult to fix.

            > so i guess
            > i was mostly looking at a "rebuild" to get ahead of the game and prevent
            > all the future breakdowns. the tractor came "free" with the cabin i
            > bought, and after looking at the price of new compact tractors, i feel
            > it's the morally right and respectful thing to do
            Well, if you priced out new compact tractors, you also know that
            something equal to the mowing capacity of the 184 is VERY expensive. You
            can put a lot of money into a 184 and still be way ahead of the guy who
            plunks down $16,000 (and then some) for a compact tractor.

            > to refurbish this classic tractor. i have a retired gentleman in the
            > area that said he could do a rebuld over the winter, and when asked how
            > much it would cost, he said what he usually says whenever asked about
            > the cost of a repair, "more than a fella would want." again, i would
            > love to at least try a tuneup (replace the sparks, etc.) and rebuilding
            > the carb myself ( i have the kit) - i have all the manuals, but it's a
            > matter of time management for me.
            If you have the owner and service manual, you have enough to do all of
            those things. Be sure to replace the spark plug wires with copper core
            wire, not the modern stuff used for cars - it has too much resistance
            for the old ignition system. Probably one of the best investments you
            can make these days is to replace the ignition points and condenser with
            a Pertronix No. 1442 ignition module. And a set of spark plugs wouldn't
            hurt either.

            Mike
            thanks again
            > bob
            >
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