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Re: [icons-rpg] Villain a day

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  • John McMullen
    Now that I ve read that, sure. I don t see the Freedom Four as lasting long: three of the four are essentially there to embarrass The Man, but Baron Kriminel
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 18, 2013
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      Now that I've read that, sure. I don't see the Freedom Four as lasting long: three of the four are essentially there to embarrass The Man, but Baron Kriminel seems the odd one out. Is he doing it because it gives him useful things for his criminal enterprise? Is he doing it out of some feeling for Black Flame? Is he doing it simply because an attractive sister like her should not be alone in the company of two honkies?

      (Answers tomorrow.)

      But after they fall apart, it might be interesting to see Arobas trying to get the band back together because he has a specific goal in mind. From the players' standpoint, he keeps showing up at crimes committed by one of the other three and probably helping them escape...so they'll owe him. (Given his ability to travel through wires and the presence of electrical wires all through the city, he probably doesn't even mind being captured sometimes by the right heroes; they can't isolate him from electrical outlets before arriving at the police station. Obviously not true if they have power nullification or the right kind of force field or whatever.)

      Another item that I didn't mention is that he's likely to be the most media savvy of any group of villains he's in. He's the one who will tip off the news outlets, who will make sure that a blogger gets kidnapped and held as hostage, who might (in fact) provide a computer so the blogger can blog live (because a computer with an ethernet cable is an escape to him). He's the one who'll make sure that the eyes of the world are on whatever he thinks the injustice is.

       
      John McMullen (Searching for a .sig)
      jhmcmullen@...


      From: Soylent Green <gsoylent@...>
      To: icons group <icons-rpg@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Tuesday, June 18, 2013 3:06 PM
      Subject: RE: [icons-rpg] Villain a day



      Villainomicon entry for Black Flame. I only know that because I consciously decided to, as an experiment, to make  canon characters the focus in my current, soon to end, mini-campaign.  

      Even then, I've take a lot of liberties with them.


      To: icons-rpg@yahoogroups.com
      From: jhmcmullen@...
      Date: Tue, 18 Jun 2013 12:01:43 -0700
      Subject: Re: [icons-rpg] Villain a day

       

      Agh--I don't even remember the Freedom Four. Where are they referenced? Was it published, or in the team exercise you had a while back?
       
      John McMullen (Searching for a .sig)
      jhmcmullen@...


      From: Soylent Green <gsoylent@...>
      To: icons group <icons-rpg@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Tuesday, June 18, 2013 2:58 PM
      Subject: RE: [icons-rpg] Villain a day



      I like the idea of Arobas turning to the heroes for help. In this day and age it's hard to sympathise a little with him.

      But if want to stick with Icons-verse canon, another use for Arobas is as part of the Freedom Four with Black Flame, Baron Kriminel and Pulsar.

      Anyway, looking forward to you next villains.


      To: icons-rpg@yahoogroups.com
      From: jhmcmullen@...
      Date: Tue, 18 Jun 2013 07:51:19 -0700
      Subject: [icons-rpg] Villain a day

       

      Because I was bored, I decided to spend the next few days coming up with an adventure idea or two for each of the villains in the ICONS rulebook. (If I'm still bored and distracted then, I'll do the Villainomicon.)

      Ground rule: All the characters in the rulebook and the Villainomicon exist in the same world. If it appeals to me, I'll pull in some other character from an Ad Infinitum adventure, but not from one of the other publishers. (Though I'd be willing to suggest one, I won't specifically include one.)

      Arobas 
      It seems to me that Arobas is best used as a reason for people to be mad at him or to create a situation that the heroes have to deal with: he believes truly that information should be free, and he makes free whatever information he thinks is socially useful. (His idea of socially useful and the players' or authorities might not be the same.) For example, a Gimmick-based character such as Iron Man or Batman is clearly aligned with the 1%, telling other people how to act and trying to enforce their views on other people. (He never notices when he''s trying to enforce his views, of course.) In this interpretation, Arobas doesn't work with killers or world-destroying aliens or robots. In fact, a duel between Arobas and Sigma-9 might end messily; Arobas would probably be on the side of the heroes when dealing with Sigma-9. (He'd try to escape right afterward, but he'd help the heroes first.)
       
      He's also probably vulnerable to someone of the appropriate sex with the "correct" ideology. If you wanted to expand him a bit, I'd give him a touch of Shapeshift: when he comes back from his alternate form, he might be able to make cosmetic changes to his looks.
       
      1. Where can a hacker reign supreme? That right, inside a holodeck-like machine. He hires a group of supervillains to lure them to a location he has set up, planned for an attack using their weaknesses, and then the heroes wake up, having apparently just barely won the terrific battle. Except of course, they lost and are now in a virtual world, one controlled by Arobas. And he just wants to make them think it's real so that they will reveal secrets: identities, names of loved ones, and so forth. Players will soon discover that every electronic transaction takes a second longer than it should (Arobas has to track the information and provide a duplicate world: he's fast, but he's not so fast that it can be done without noticing). There should be plausible excuses for the delays, but they are always there. He has not taken pictures of the characters without their masks: that would be cheating.

      2. Once he heard about PRISM, Arobas had to hack it and make all the information free. In the process, he learned that PRISM was actually built because the NSA had a strong rumor that some supervillain somewhere had equipment that did all of this. That rumor is true, and now the supervillain is ready to delete Arobas. Arobas can't go to a supervillain (he doesn't know which one wants him dead) so he goes to the heroes. (If they've encountered him before, it's because he knows they're good; if he hasn't encountered them before, he's willing to risk that they haven't been compromised.)

      The smartest computer hacker in the world isn't Arobas or Rex Mundi or Sock Puppet, it's Luther Lawless, a mild-mannered system administrator working for a private company. He's never committed a crime because he doesn't see a point in it: he gets everything he needs for life by using a tenth of his brain for the corporation (who has no idea he's anything other than a good system administrator). He has all the resources he needs for playing Globe of Grandeur, the massively multiplayer online game he's addicted to. Except Arobas exposed the link between the GoG corporate treasurer and the Mob (possibly the Octofather), which shut down the servers in the heroes' home town for two days and blamed the heroes for all of this. (He might have also exposed Luther's crush on another player, which is even worse.) Luther couldn't play his favourite game for two days...and when it did come back, all the characters were level 1. Now Luther has a purpose for that giant intellect: destroy the heroes. The attacks have a similar MO to Arobas', so the players have to find out who's really behind them (Arobas actually has an alibi), why he's doing it, and pin Arobas for the original crime. (Shutting down the servers also gains the players a great deal of negative press from other members of the gaming community, but Luther is the immediate threat.)
       
      John McMullen (Searching for a .sig)
      jhmcmullen@...










    • alienmastermind
      In Flight of the Nova-1 I created an affiliation of AI and Computer based villains called The Signal. It consists of Sigma-9, Skeletron, Sock Puppet, and
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 19, 2013
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        In 'Flight of the Nova-1' I created an affiliation of AI and Computer based villains called The Signal. It consists of Sigma-9, Skeletron, Sock Puppet, and Grue -- a nanotech creature of darkness - featured in the module later. :)

        Dan

        --- In icons-rpg@yahoogroups.com, John McMullen <jhmcmullen@...> wrote:
        >
        > Because I was bored, I decided to spend the next few days coming up with an adventure idea or two for each of the villains in the ICONS rulebook. (If I'm still bored and distracted then, I'll do the Villainomicon.)
        >
        > Ground rule: All the characters in the rulebook and the Villainomicon exist in the same world. If it appeals to me, I'll pull in some other character from an Ad Infinitum adventure, but not from one of the other publishers. (Though I'd be willing to suggest one, I won't specifically include one.)
        >
        > Arobas 
        > It seems to me that Arobas is best used as a reason for people to be mad at him or to create a situation that the heroes have to deal with: he believes truly that information should be free, and he makes free whatever information he thinks is socially useful. (His idea of socially useful and the players' or authorities might not be the same.) For example, a Gimmick-based character such as Iron Man or Batman is clearly aligned with the 1%, telling other people how to act and trying to enforce their views on other people. (He never notices when he''s trying to enforce his views, of course.) In this interpretation, Arobas doesn't work with killers or world-destroying aliens or robots. In fact, a duel between Arobas and Sigma-9 might end messily; Arobas would probably be on the side of the heroes when dealing with Sigma-9. (He'd try to escape right afterward, but he'd help the heroes first.)
        >  
        > He's also probably vulnerable to someone of the appropriate sex with the "correct" ideology. If you wanted to expand him a bit, I'd give him a touch of Shapeshift: when he comes back from his alternate form, he might be able to make cosmetic changes to his looks.
        >  
        > 1. Where can a hacker reign supreme? That right, inside a holodeck-like machine. He hires a group of supervillains to lure them to a location he has set up, planned for an attack using their weaknesses, and then the heroes wake up, having apparently just barely won the terrific battle. Except of course, they lost and are now in a virtual world, one controlled by Arobas. And he just wants to make them think it's real so that they will reveal secrets: identities, names of loved ones, and so forth. Players will soon discover that every electronic transaction takes a second longer than it should (Arobas has to track the information and provide a duplicate world: he's fast, but he's not so fast that it can be done without noticing). There should be plausible excuses for the delays, but they are always there. He has not taken pictures of the characters without their masks: that would be cheating.
        >
        > 2. Once he heard about PRISM, Arobas had to hack it and make all the information free. In the process, he learned that PRISM was actually built because the NSA had a strong rumor that some supervillain somewhere had equipment that did all of this. That rumor is true, and now the supervillain is ready to delete Arobas. Arobas can't go to a supervillain (he doesn't know which one wants him dead) so he goes to the heroes. (If they've encountered him before, it's because he knows they're good; if he hasn't encountered them before, he's willing to risk that they haven't been compromised.)
        >
        > The smartest computer hacker in the world isn't Arobas or Rex Mundi or Sock Puppet, it's Luther Lawless, a mild-mannered system administrator working for a private company. He's never committed a crime because he doesn't see a point in it: he gets everything he needs for life by using a tenth of his brain for the corporation (who has no idea he's anything other than a good system administrator). He has all the resources he needs for playing Globe of Grandeur, the massively multiplayer online game he's addicted to. Except Arobas exposed the link between the GoG corporate treasurer and the Mob (possibly the Octofather), which shut down the servers in the heroes' home town for two days and blamed the heroes for all of this. (He might have also exposed Luther's crush on another player, which is even worse.) Luther couldn't play his favourite game for two days...and when it did come back, all the characters were level 1. Now Luther has a purpose for that
        > giant intellect: destroy the heroes. The attacks have a similar MO to Arobas', so the players have to find out who's really behind them (Arobas actually has an alibi), why he's doing it, and pin Arobas for the original crime. (Shutting down the servers also gains the players a great deal of negative press from other members of the gaming community, but Luther is the immediate threat.)
        >  
        >
        > John McMullen (Searching for a .sig)
        > jhmcmullen@...
        >
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