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Re: [iapsm_youthmembers] Coke and Nestlé fund PAHO

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  • Saishankar Prathap
    No funds from food cos to combat NCDs: WHO Rema Nagarajan, TNN Dec 14, 2012, 03.38PM IST NEW DELHI: Beleaguered by repeated charges of taking money from the
    Message 1 of 22 , Apr 16, 2013
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      No funds from food cos to combat NCDs: WHO

      Rema Nagarajan, TNN Dec 14, 2012, 03.38PM IST

      NEW DELHI: Beleaguered by repeated charges of taking money from the very industries whose products are causing non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancers, the World Health Organisation has declared that it does not accept funding from the food and beverage manufacturers such as Coke, Pepsi, Nestle or Kraft for work on NCD prevention and control.

      "The WHO Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity and Health commits WHO to hold discussions with the private sector, but the organisation will not take money from private companies active in food and beverage production for work on NCD prevention and control as implied by media articles," stated the organisation in a public statement.

      http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2012-12-14/delhi/35819660_1_ncds-private-sector-beverage



      On Wed, Apr 10, 2013 at 9:50 PM, Prof. Umesh Kapil <umeshkapil@...> wrote:
       

      Coke and Nestlé fund PAHO

      News broke late last year that the Pan American Health Organization had accepted money from transnational food corporations, including Coca-Cola and Nestlé, to support its work to prevent and control obesity and chronic non-communicable diseases. The report, available here, was issued by the global news agency Reuters. It began:

      'The Pan American Health Organization not only is relying on the food and beverage industry for advice on how to fight obesity. For the first time in its 110-year history, it has taken hundreds of thousands of dollars in money from the industry'.

      Identifying PAHO as the regional office of the World Health Organization for the Americas, the report continued: 'Accepting industry funding goes against WHO's worldwide policies. Its Geneva headquarters and five other regional offices have been prohibited from accepting money from the food and soda industries, among others. "If such conflicts of interest were perceived to exist, or actually existed, this would jeopardize WHO's ability to set globally recognized and respected standards and guidelines", said spokesman Gregory Härtl.

      'But…PAHO, based in Washington and founded 46 years before it was affiliated with WHO in 1948 – had different standards allowing the business donations. Even so, not until this February did PAHO begin taking industry money. Reuters found $50,000 from Coca-Cola, the world's largest beverage company; $150,000 from Nestlé, the world's largest food company; and $150,000 from Unilever…

      'The recent infusion of corporate cash is the most pointed example to date of how WHO is approaching its battle against chronic disease. Increasingly, it is relying on what it calls "partnerships" with industry, opting to enter into alliances with food and beverage companies rather than maintain strict neutrality'.

      Interviewed by Reuters, Association member Boyd Swinburn, co-director of the International Obesity Task Force, said: 'Food and beverage companies exert a huge influence on policies that affect the health of millions. Industry is buzzing all around… Even in things like nutrition guidelines, they're usually in the room at the policymaking table or buzzing around it and putting all sort of pressure on, bringing their huge conflicts of interest and their huge resources to it – and we're wondering why we don't get much public interest policy coming out'.

      The WHO response

      A prompt public response, available here, came from Margaret Chan (above, right), director-general of WHO Geneva. She stated: 'The Political Declaration of the High-level Meeting of the United Nations General Assembly on the Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases, agreed by global leaders at the UN General Assembly in 2011, called on the international community to undertake a series of actions. One of these actions was to call on the private sector to promote measures to implement WHO recommendations to reduce exposure to the risk factors which contribute to NCDs. The WHO Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity and Health commits WHO to hold discussions with the private sector'. But, she stated categorically: 'the Organization will not take money from private companies active infood and beverage production for work on NCD prevention and control'.

      Margaret Chan explained that formally, the branch of WHO for the Americas is AMRO, the Regional Office for the Americas, whereas PAHO, a separate legal entity, 'may have variations in policy'. Thus, she confirmed, 'In its capacity as PAHO, food and beverage manufacturers have contributed financially as part of a multi-sector forum to address NCDs'.

      Many public health and nutrition professionals were shocked and even scandalised by the Reuters report. So where did this leave the Pan American Health Organization? The report coincided with the final months of the term of office of Marta Roses Periago (above, left) as PAHO director. In the words of one of the signatories of the open letter below 'It seemed more appropriate to send a message of strong support and encouragement to the new director Carissa Etienne. Our letter also asks her on behalf of the public health and nutrition communities to state that the previous practice of accepting money and all other forms of support from conflicted industry and its associated organisations is now at an end'.


      Dr. Umesh Kapil 

      Professor Public Health Nutrition 
      Room Number 118; 

      Human Nutrition Unit,
      Old OT Block,
      All India Institute of Medical Sciences 
      New Delhi,  India ,110029
      Mobile 91-9810609340


       

       



      --- On Wed, 2/10/10, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@...> wrote:

      From: surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@...>
      Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers] Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians
      To: iapsm_youthmembers@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 1:46 AM

       

      Sending the link once again. It is working here with me.
       


       
      Thank you very much.
      Nikhil
      Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
      MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
      FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
      Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
      CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
      Pin-176001.
      01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
      Mobile: 094181-28634.
                        drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
       


      --- On Wed, 2/10/10, Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com> wrote:

      From: Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com>
      Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers ] Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians
      To: iapsm_youthmembers@ yahoogroups. com
      Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 11:51 AM

       
      The link says page not found.
       
      Does this article say that the the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased in India? Could you mention the figures?
       
      regards,
       
      rakesh

      On Wed, Feb 10, 2010 at 11:12 AM, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@ yahoo.com> wrote:
       
      The risk of hepatitis B infection is well documented among healthcare workers. Although with the use of hepatitis B vaccine the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased, there is still substantial scope for improvement, as many healthcare workers are unvaccinated. Therefore, there is a need for well-planned and clear policies for HBV screening and vaccination in healthcare workers, especially those who are at a greater risk of exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material.
       
       
      Thanks  
      Nikhil
      Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
      MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
      FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
      Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
      CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
      Pin-176001.
      01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
      Mobile: 094181-28634.
                        drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
       




    • Prof. Umesh Kapil
      This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Find out more here BMJ Helping doctors make better decisions
      Message 2 of 22 , Sep 11, 2013
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        BMJ
        Helping doctors make better decisions
        Research News
        New safety concerns over supplement powders for infants in Pakistan
        BMJ 2013; 346 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmji2604 (Published 24 April 2013) Cite this as: BMJ 2013;346:f2604
        Lancet 2013; doi: 10. 1016/S0140-6736(13)60437-7
        Infants and young children given micronutrient powders had more bloody diarrhoea and more respiratory symptoms than controls in a recent trial from Pakistan, and the authors have called for a closer look at safety before distribution is scaled up. The World Health Organization already recommends the powders to help control iron deficiency anaemia in vulnerable children. The new trial tested sachets that contained iron; folic acid; and vitamins A, C, and D, with or without additional zinc.
        Children given daily powders mixed with weaning food between 6 and 18 months of age grew slightly but significantly more than controls who had no supplements (an extra 0.31 cm, 95% CI 0.03 to 0.59 for children given micronutrients without zinc; an extra 0.56 cm, 0.29 to 0.84 for those given micronutrients with zinc). They also had a lower prevalence of iron deficiency at 18 months (22.9% and 26.5% v 57%). However, mothers reported a significantly higher incidence of bloody diarrhoea in children receiving supplements, which corresponded to roughly one extra episode a year for every 12-13 children treated. Mothers of children in both treated groups also reported significantly more “chest indrawing” than mothers of controls. The micronutrient  powders didn’t increase the incidence of fever or hospital admissions for pneumonia.
        Researchers randomised 256 clusters of children in urban and rural areas of Pakistan. The children were poorly nourished at baseline, with high rates of stunting, wasting, diarrhoea, and respiratory infections. Fewer than half the participating families had piped drinking water. The researchers say the extra morbidity associated with micronutrient powders is new, worrying, and may not be worth the limited benefits.
        Notes
        Cite this as: BMJ 2013;346:f2604

      • Prof. Umesh Kapil
        DEAR ALL  THIS IS FOR YOUR COMMENTS AND DISSEMINATION  TO ALL COLLEAGUES UMESH KAPIL BMJ EDITORIAL Improving child survival through vitamin A supplementation
        Message 3 of 22 , Oct 9, 2013
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          DEAR ALL 

          THIS IS FOR YOUR COMMENTS AND DISSEMINATION 
          TO ALL COLLEAGUES

          UMESH KAPIL

          EDITORIAL
          Improving child survival through vitamin A supplementation
          BMJ 2011; 343 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.d5294 (Published 25 August 2011)
          Cite this as: BMJ 2011;343:d5294
          3 October 2013
          The editorial by Thorne-Lyman and Fawzi in 2011, (1) referring to the meta-analysis of the impact of vitamin A supplements by Mayo-Wilson, Imdad and others, (2,3) has now become more important than ever. The DEVTA results, only informally available in 2011, have now been published, (4) with extensive implications; indeed, as the editorial (1) says: ‘… the null findings have left lingering questions. Is vitamin A supplementation effective?’. These results have been the subject of conflicting comments recently in the Lancet, e.g. (5,6). But a number of inferences that should be drawn from the compilation and analysis of the evidence from trials prior to DEVTA (2,3) help answer this lingering question, and have not received adequate attention. There are three key related points, which now point to the need to seriously consider concrete steps to move beyond 6-monthly vitamin A supplementation at unphysiological levels.
          First, the trend through time in reported impact on mortality of high dose vitamin A 6-monthly supplements (usually 200,000 IUs) is informative, but some important inferences are not being drawn. The original meta-analyses by Beaton et al (7) in 1993 drew upon the 8 studies available at that time, to estimate an average mortality reduction (in 12-59 month children) of 23%. The recent meta-analyses (2,3) drew on seven of these, and added a further nine. They concluded that the weighted average mortality finding (without DEVTA) was essentially unchanged. What they did not point out is that 89% of the weight in this average came from the seven pre 1993 trials; the remaining 9 trials, with 11% weight, not surprisingly had little effect on the calculation.
          Further, it was not pointed out that of the 16 results, 8 showed no significant impact; since 1993, only two of 9 showed impact. Thus what is being confirmed is that the early trials showed efficacy; but there is sparse evidence in the past 20 years for this still being so, and none for large scale effectiveness. It seems disingenuous to imply that these new analyses confirm the continuing efficacy of VAC supplements.
          Second, by not including the possibility of changing impact through time, the effect of major changes in disease patterns is ignored. The impact on mortality was estimated in the original trials as resulting from reducing deaths from measles and diarrhea; no other causes were significant. (7, p50) Measles has been greatly reduced, by successful immunization programs, since the 1990’s; and diarrhea deaths have fallen, with improved living conditions, use of health services, and of ORT.
           Although the mechanism for intermittent high-dose VACs to reduce mortality is not known, it is only established as being relevant in these two diseases (7). Thus it is to be expected that mortality impact, if still present, would be reduced. The negative results of DEVTA, and of the study referred to by Benn et al, (8) are thus also not surprising. Both of these investigations, refuting conventional wisdom, suffered extraordinarily long delays in publication, in the DEVTA case causing speculation that ‘undoubtedly, the fact that there was no apparent effect detected delayed publication’. (5) Benn et al have a similar view about their unpublished results.(8) It is also seems disingenuous to assert that VACs are ‘a proven life-saving intervention’, (9) as if this necessarily continues under changing conditions, and in countries where measles has been controlled and diarrhea prevention and treatment improved.
          Third, vitamin A deficiency (VAD) is measured by serum retinol, as recommended by WHO. (10) The prevalence of VAD is around 30% in poor countries and falling only slowly.(11) However, it is clear that 6-monthly high dose VAD has only a limited and transient impact on serum retinol, (12, refs 6-20) which is how vitamin A gets to target tissues. There are established effective methods for reducing VAD: frequent physiological intakes of vitamin A or precursors through improved diets, fortification, and/or low dose supplements; (12, refs 22-35) moreover this is considered safe in pregnancy, in contrast to VACs.
          So the question becomes: why has most of the attention been on VACs (13) (over 7 billion so far distributed), (14) of unproven effectiveness in operational programmes, when employing these other approaches would have a wider range of benefits, including addressing any residual impact on child mortality that VACs 6-monthly may be having?
          This would free up scarce resources now being used for VAC campaigns, which have considerable opportunity costs.(15) Improved diets, fortified foods, and multiple micronutrient provision would surely bring broader improvements in nutrition to more people, including reproductive aged women who are now largely excluded.
          John Mason, PhD[1], David Sanders MD[2], Roger Shrimpton PhD[1], Ted Greiner PhD[3].
          1) School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans
          2) School of Public Health, University of the Western Cape, South Africa
          3) Department of Nutrition, Hanyang University, South Korea.
          1 Thorne-Lyman A, Fawzi WW. Improving child survival through vitamin A supplementation. BMJ. 2011 Aug 25;343:d5294. doi: 10.1136/bmj.d5294. PubMed PMID: 21868480
          2 Mayo-Wilson E, Imdad A, Herzer K, Yakoob MY, Bhutta ZA. Vitamin A supplements for preventing mortality, illness, and blindness in children aged under 5: systematic review and meta-analysis. BMJ. 2011 Aug 25;343:d5094. doi: 10.1136/bmj.d5094. Review. PubMed PMID: 21868478; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3162042
          3 Imdad A, Herzer K, Mayo-Wilson E, Yakoob MY, Bhutta ZA. Vitamin A supplementation for preventing morbidity and mortality in children from 6 months to 5 years of age.Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2010 Dec 8;(12):CD008524. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD008524.pub2. Review. PubMed PMID: 21154399
          4 Awasthi S, Peto R, Read S, Richards SM, Pande V, Bundy D; DEVTA (Deworming and Enhanced Vitamin A) team. Population deworming every 6 months with albendazole in 1 million pre-school children in north India: DEVTA, a cluster-randomised trial.Lancet. 2013 Apr 27;381(9876):1478-86. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(12)62126-6. Epub 2013 Mar 14. PubMed PMID: 23498850; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3647147.
          5 Garner P, Taylor-Robinson D, Sachdev HS. DEVTA: results from the biggest clinical trial ever. Lancet. 2013 Apr 27;381(9876):1439-41. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(13)60600-5. Epub 2013 Mar 14. PubMed PMID: 23498851
          6 Sommer A, West KP Jr, Martorell R. Vitamin A supplementation in Indian children.Lancet. 2013 Aug 17;382(9892):591. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(13)60645-5. Epub 2013 Mar 22. PubMed PMID: 23528188
          7 Beaton, G., Martorell, R., Aronson, K., Edmonston, B., McCabe, G., Ross, A. & Harvey, B. (1993) Effectiveness of Vitamin A Supplementation in the Control of Young Child Morbidity and Mortality in Developing Countries. ACC/SCN State-of-the-Art Series, Nutrition Policy Discussion Paper No. 13. ACC/SCN, Geneva.http://www.unscn.org/layout/modules/resources/files/Policy_paper_No_13.pdf
          8 Benn CS, Fisker AB, Aaby P. Vitamin A supplementation in Indian children. Lancet. 2013 Aug 17;382(9892):593. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(13)61737-7. PubMed PMID: 23953380
          9 Mannar V, Schultink W, Spahn K. Vitamin A supplementation in Indian children.Lancet. 2013 Aug 17;382(9892):591-2. PubMed PMID: 23961552.
          10 Sommer A, Davidson FR; Annecy Accords. Assessment and control of vitamin A deficiency: the Annecy Accords. J Nutr. 2002 Sep;132(9 Suppl):2845S-2850S. PubMed PMID: 12221259
          11 UN Standing Committee on Nutrition. Progress in Nutrition. 6th Report on the World Nutrition Situation. UN-SCN, Geneva. 2010.http://www.unscn.org/files/Publications/RWNS6/html/index.html
          12 Mason JB, Ramirez MA, Fernandez CM, Pedro R, Lloren T, Saldanha L, Deitchler M, Eisele T. Effects on vitamin A deficiency in children of periodic high-dose supplements and of fortified oil promotion in a deficient area of the Philippines. Int J Vitam Nutr Res. 2011 Sep;81(5):295-305. doi: 10.1024/0300-9831/a000077. PubMed PMID: 22419200
          13 UNICEF. Vitamin A Supplementation: a Decade of Progress. 2007, New York.
          http://www.unicef.org/immunization/files/Vitamin_A_Supplementation.pdf
          14 Micronutrient Initiative. 20 Years of Progress. 2011/12 Annual Report. Ottawa.
          http://www.micronutrient.org/CMFiles/MI-AnnualReport1112-EN-web.pdf
          15 Doherty T, Chopra M, Tomlinson M, Oliphant N, Nsibande D, Mason J. Moving from vertical to integrated child health programmes: experiences from a multi-country assessment of the Child Health Days approach in Africa. Trop Med Int Health. 2010 Mar;15(3):296-305.
          Competing interests: None declared
          John B Mason, Professor
          David Sanders, Roger Shrimpton, Ted Greiner
          Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, 1440 Canal Street, Ste 2300, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA Orleans
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          © 2013 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd
           
           
          Dr. Umesh Kapil 
          Professor Public Health Nutrition 
          Room Number 118; 
          Human Nutrition Unit,
          Old OT Block,
          All India Institute of Medical Sciences 
          New Delhi,  India ,110029
          Mobile 91-9810609340

           
           


          On Tuesday, February 9, 2010 10:49 PM, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@...> wrote:
           
          Sending the link once again. It is working here with me.
           


           
          Thank you very much.
          Nikhil
          Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
          MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
          FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
          Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
          CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
          Pin-176001.
          01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
          Mobile: 094181-28634.
                            drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
           


          --- On Wed, 2/10/10, Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com> wrote:

          From: Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com>
          Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers ] Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians
          To: iapsm_youthmembers@ yahoogroups. com
          Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 11:51 AM

           
          The link says page not found.
           
          Does this article say that the the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased in India? Could you mention the figures?
           
          regards,
           
          rakesh

          On Wed, Feb 10, 2010 at 11:12 AM, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@ yahoo.com> wrote:
           
          The risk of hepatitis B infection is well documented among healthcare workers. Although with the use of hepatitis B vaccine the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased, there is still substantial scope for improvement, as many healthcare workers are unvaccinated. Therefore, there is a need for well-planned and clear policies for HBV screening and vaccination in healthcare workers, especially those who are at a greater risk of exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material.
           
           
          Thanks  
          Nikhil
          Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
          MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
          FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
          Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
          CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
          Pin-176001.
          01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
          Mobile: 094181-28634.
                            drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
           





        • Prof. Umesh Kapil
          Dear Colleague,   It is our great pleasure to invite you to participate in the 2nd International Workshop on Micronutrients and Child Health (MCHWS2014) is
          Message 4 of 22 , Apr 14, 2014
          • 0 Attachment
            Dear Colleague,
             
            It is our great pleasure to invite you to participate in the 2nd International Workshop on Micronutrients and Child Health (MCHWS2014) is being held from 3rd to 7thNovember 2014 at Jawaharlal Nehru Auditorium, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.
             
            The International Workshop is jointly organized by i) Department of Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, ii) Indian Academy of Pediatrics (Sub-Speciality Chapter on Nutrition), New Delhi, and iii) Sitaram Bhartia Institute of Science and Research, New Delhi, India.
             
            The eminent National and International scientists who are working in the field of Micronutrients and Child Health will be delivering “State of Art” Presentations. After each presentation, in-depth deliberations will be held, to discuss the issues raised by the eminent scientists and participants.
             
            The presentations and discussions on Magnitude of the deficiencies of Iron, Iodine, Vitamin A, Zinc, Vitamin D, Vitamin B12, Folic Acid, Fluorine, Vitamin B-6 etc., their Health Consequences, Methodology for their Assessments, Strategies for Prevention and Control; Supplementation of micronutrients to reduce Child Morbidity and Mortality, Food Fortification, Multiple Micronutrient Supplementation to Pregnant Mothers, Double Fortified Salt, Multiple Micronutrient Supplementation to Children,  Sprinklers in Control of Anemia, Calcium supplementation and Maternal Mortality, Genetic Modified foods and related issues will be held. 
             
            The International Workshop is being organised on Self Sustaining Basis and hence all the participants are required to be registered.
             
            Please visit  International Workshop web site >www.mchws2014.com< for details.
             
            We look forward to welcome you for 2nd International Workshop on Micronutrients and Child Health and make this event a grand success.
             
            With Personal Regards 
            Dr. Umesh Kapil ,Professor Public Health Nutrition
            Human Nutrition Unit
            Room Number 118; 
            Old OT Block,
            All India Institute of Medical Sciences 
            New Delhi,  India ,110029
            Mobile 91-9810609340; 01126588058

            For details of 
            “2nd International Congress on Micronutrients and Child Health  (MCHWS2014)” 
             
             
            Dr. Umesh Kapil 
            Professor Public Health Nutrition 
            Room No. 118;
            Human Nutrition Unit,
            Old OT Block,All India Institute of Medical Sciences New Delhi,  India ,110029
            Mobile 91-9810609340
            For details of “2nd International Congress on Micronutrients and Child Health  (MCHWS2014) Ple ase Visit Website >www.mchws2014.com < 
             
             
            On Tuesday, February 9, 2010 10:49 PM, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@...> wrote:
             
            Sending the link once again. It is working here with me.
             


             
            Thank you very much.
            Nikhil
            Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
            MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
            FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
            Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
            CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
            Pin-176001.
            01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
            Mobile: 094181-28634.
                              drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
             


            --- On Wed, 2/10/10, Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com> wrote:

            From: Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com>
            Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers ] Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians
            To: iapsm_youthmembers@ yahoogroups. com
            Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 11:51 AM

             
            The link says page not found.
             
            Does this article say that the the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased in India? Could you mention the figures?
             
            regards,
             
            rakesh

            On Wed, Feb 10, 2010 at 11:12 AM, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@ yahoo.com> wrote:
             
            The risk of hepatitis B infection is well documented among healthcare workers. Although with the use of hepatitis B vaccine the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased, there is still substantial scope for improvement, as many healthcare workers are unvaccinated. Therefore, there is a need for well-planned and clear policies for HBV screening and vaccination in healthcare workers, especially those who are at a greater risk of exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material.
             
             
            Thanks  
            Nikhil
            Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
            MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
            FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
            Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
            CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
            Pin-176001.
            01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
            Mobile: 094181-28634.
                              drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
             





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