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Re: [iapsm_youthmembers] HUNGaMA Report

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  • surendernikhil gupta
    Agreed, Sir. The HUNGaMA Survey was conducted with the objective of presenting to the nation a recent set of district level data on nutrition status of
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 1, 2012
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      Agreed, Sir. The HUNGaMA Survey was conducted with the objective of presenting to the nation a recent set of district level data on nutrition status of children below 5 years old. The survey covered 73,670 households across 112 districts spanning nine states in India. If we have the look at the sample size (Page 14 of the file) of the nine districts selected for the study, the big chunk comes from BIMRU states, which are still the worst performing. Hence the result can’t be extrapolated to India as a whole. It is deceptive vision. 
      Thank you very much.
      With warm personal regards,
       
      Nikhil
      Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
      MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH;
      PGDCHFWM;FAIMS;;MA (Phil);
      FIMS;MAE (Epidemiology); OCCRTI
      Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
      Chheb, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
      Pin-176001.
      01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
      Mobile: 094181-28634.


      -Editor_African Journal of Environmental Science and Technology

      -Member_National Editorial Advisory Board_Indian  Journal of Emergency Pediatrics

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                        drnikhilsurender@...
       


      --- On Tue, 1/17/12, Prof. Umesh Kapil <umeshkapil@...> wrote:

      From: Prof. Umesh Kapil <umeshkapil@...>
      Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers] HUNGaMA Report
      To: "pg_snsph" <pg_snsph@yahoogroups.com>, iapsm_youthmembers@yahoogroups.com, "Medico Friends Circle" <mfriendcircle@yahoogroups.com>
      Date: Tuesday, January 17, 2012, 5:38 PM

       

      Dear Subodh
       
      Thanks for sharing the report.
       
      Study has included worst performimg districts and extrapolated data  for entire country.
       
      We can not comapre the apples with oranges.This is what has been done and projected as finding of the study.
       
      The NFHS 3 takes proportionate sampling according to the ration urban and rural population. Further , it also  take  proportionate sample  from each of the socio economic groups in the different states in the country.
       
      HUNGAMA  is good for awakening of the administrators however we can not generalise for the entire country . The media is just doing this.
       
      The reduction in Undernutrition is  outcome of overall dvelopemnt ( health , agriculture, industires , road, water supply and sanitation etc etc ) of the population. The vertical dvelopment in selected few sectors  like IT, Industry as seen by our  economic growth  etc will have minimal impact ( 0.8 %  to 1% reduction in undernutrition)  improvement  per year.
       
      The answer for tackling the undernutrition amongst children lies with horizontal development of our population. Every section of then population have benfits of the economic development
       
      With regrads
       
      Umesh   
       


       
      Dr. Umesh Kapil,
      Professor , Public Health Nutrition,
      Human Nutrition Unit,
      Old OT Block
      All India Institute of Medical Sciences ,
      New Delhi, 110029,
      India 110029
      Mobile :09810609340,
      Office 911126593383;  Fax 911126588461 
       
       


      --- On Tue, 1/17/12, Subodh <subodhsgupta@...> wrote:

      From: Subodh <subodhsgupta@...>
      Subject: [iapsm_youthmembers] HUNGaMA Report
      To: "pg_snsph" <pg_snsph@yahoogroups.com>, iapsm_youthmembers@yahoogroups.com, "Medico Friends Circle" <mfriendcircle@yahoogroups.com>
      Date: Tuesday, January 17, 2012, 6:12 AM

       

      Dear All,

       

      As you would have read in news, the Prime Minister last week released the HUNGaMA report, a report on hunger and malnutrition in India. You can download this report from the url: http://hungamaforchange.org/HungamaBKDec11LR.pdf .

       

      The salient findings of the report are:

       

      Child malnutrition is widespread across states and districts: In the 100 Focus Districts, 42 per cent of children under-five are underweight and 59 percent are stunted. Of the children suffering from stunting, about half are severely stunted. In the best district in each of these states, the rates of child underweight and stunting are significantly lower - 33 and 43 percent respectively.

       

      A reduction in the prevalence of child malnutrition is observed: In the 100 Focus Districts, the prevalence of child underweight has decreased from 53 per cent (DLHS, 2004) to 42 percent (HUNGaMA 2011); this represents a 20.3 percent decrease over a 7 year period with an average annual rate of reduction of 2.9 per cent.

       

      Child malnutrition starts very early in life: By age 24 months, 42 percent of children are underweight and 58 per cent are stunted in the 100 Focus Districts; birth weight seems to be an important risk-factor as the prevalence of underweight in children born with a weight below 2.5 kg is 50 per cent while that among children born with a weight above 2.5 kg is 34 per cent; the corresponding figures for stunting are 62 and 50 percent respectively.

       

      Girls’ nutrition advantage over boys fades away with time: Girls seem to have a nutrition advantage over boys in the first months of life; however this advantage seems to be reversed over time as girls and boys grow older.

       

      Mothers’ education level determines children’s nutrition: In the 100 Focus Districts, 66 per cent mothers did not attend school; rates of child underweight and stunting are significantly higher among mothers with low levels of education; the prevalence of child underweight among mothers who cannot read is 45 per cent while that among mothers with 10 or more years of education is 27 per cent. The corresponding figures for child stunting are 63 and 43 per cent respectively.

       

      While the signs of progress in the data are promising, much more remains to be done.

       

      Best regards,

      Subodh

       

      ________________________________

      Dr. Subodh S Gupta,
      National Professional Officer (Child Health and Development)
      WHO Country Office for India

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