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Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians

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  • surendernikhil gupta
    The risk of hepatitis B infection is well documented among healthcare workers. Although with the use of hepatitis B vaccine the incidence of HBV infection in
    Message 1 of 22 , Feb 9, 2010
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      The risk of hepatitis B infection is well documented among healthcare workers. Although with the use of hepatitis B vaccine the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased, there is still substantial scope for improvement, as many healthcare workers are unvaccinated. Therefore, there is a need for well-planned and clear policies for HBV screening and vaccination in healthcare workers, especially those who are at a greater risk of exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material.
       

      http://www.jlponline.org/article.asp?issn=0974-2727;year=2009;volume=1;issue=2;spage=41;epage=48;aulast=Singhal


       
      Thanks  
      Nikhil
      Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
      MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH;PGCHFWM;
      FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
      Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
      CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
      Pin-176001.
      01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
      Mobile: 094181-28634.
                        drnikhilsurender@...
       

    • Rakesh Biswas
      The link says page not found. Does this article say that the the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased in India? Could you mention the figures?
      Message 2 of 22 , Feb 9, 2010
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        The link says page not found.
         
        Does this article say that the the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased in India? Could you mention the figures?
         
        regards,
         
        rakesh

        On Wed, Feb 10, 2010 at 11:12 AM, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@...> wrote:
         

        The risk of hepatitis B infection is well documented among healthcare workers. Although with the use of hepatitis B vaccine the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased, there is still substantial scope for improvement, as many healthcare workers are unvaccinated. Therefore, there is a need for well-planned and clear policies for HBV screening and vaccination in healthcare workers, especially those who are at a greater risk of exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material.
         

        http://www.jlponline.org/article.asp?issn=0974-2727;year=2009;volume=1;issue=2;spage=41;epage=48;aulast=Singhal


         
        Thanks  
        Nikhil
        Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
        MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH;PGCHFWM;
        FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
        Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
        CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
        Pin-176001.
        01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
        Mobile: 094181-28634.
                          drnikhilsurender@...
         


      • surendernikhil gupta
        Sending the link once again. It is working here with me.   http://www.jlponlin e.org/article. asp?issn= 0974-2727; year=2009; volume=1; issue=2;spage=
        Message 3 of 22 , Feb 9, 2010
        • 0 Attachment
          Sending the link once again. It is working here with me.
           


           
          Thank you very much.
          Nikhil
          Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
          MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH;PGCHFWM;
          FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
          Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
          CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
          Pin-176001.
          01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
          Mobile: 094181-28634.
                            drnikhilsurender@...
           


          --- On Wed, 2/10/10, Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@...> wrote:

          From: Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@...>
          Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers] Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians
          To: iapsm_youthmembers@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 11:51 AM

           
          The link says page not found.
           
          Does this article say that the the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased in India? Could you mention the figures?
           
          regards,
           
          rakesh

          On Wed, Feb 10, 2010 at 11:12 AM, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@ yahoo.com> wrote:
           
          The risk of hepatitis B infection is well documented among healthcare workers. Although with the use of hepatitis B vaccine the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased, there is still substantial scope for improvement, as many healthcare workers are unvaccinated. Therefore, there is a need for well-planned and clear policies for HBV screening and vaccination in healthcare workers, especially those who are at a greater risk of exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material.
           
           
          Thanks  
          Nikhil
          Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
          MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
          FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
          Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
          CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
          Pin-176001.
          01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
          Mobile: 094181-28634.
                            drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
           



        • Rakesh Biswas
          Thanks not working here yet even with the new one. Can you copy paste and send it to me in the text of the email ( separately to me and perhaps not to the
          Message 4 of 22 , Feb 9, 2010
          • 0 Attachment
            Thanks not working here yet even with the new one.
             
            Can you copy paste and send it to me in the text of the email ( separately to me and perhaps not to the entire list)?
             
            Or just let me know the figures from what percentage to what has the incidence in health workers fallen to?
             
            regards,

            On Wed, Feb 10, 2010 at 12:16 PM, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@...> wrote:
             

            Sending the link once again. It is working here with me.
             


             
            Thank you very much.
            Nikhil
            Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
            MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH;PGCHFWM;
            FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
            Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
            CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
            Pin-176001.
            01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
            Mobile: 094181-28634.
                              drnikhilsurender@...
             


            --- On Wed, 2/10/10, Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@...> wrote:

            From: Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@...>
            Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers] Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians
            To: iapsm_youthmembers@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 11:51 AM

             
            The link says page not found.
             
            Does this article say that the the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased in India? Could you mention the figures?
             
            regards,
             
            rakesh

            On Wed, Feb 10, 2010 at 11:12 AM, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@ yahoo.com> wrote:
             
            The risk of hepatitis B infection is well documented among healthcare workers. Although with the use of hepatitis B vaccine the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased, there is still substantial scope for improvement, as many healthcare workers are unvaccinated. Therefore, there is a need for well-planned and clear policies for HBV screening and vaccination in healthcare workers, especially those who are at a greater risk of exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material.
             
             
            Thanks  
            Nikhil
            Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
            MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
            FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
            Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
            CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
            Pin-176001.
            01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
            Mobile: 094181-28634.
                              drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
             




          • Prof. Umesh Kapil
            Dear  ALL     We are happy to inform you that the Finalized National Consensus  Statement of  Workshop on Management of SAM Children   through Medical
            Message 5 of 22 , Apr 20, 2010
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              Dear  ALL

               

               

              We are happy to inform you that the Finalized National Consensus  Statement of  Workshop on Management of SAM Children   through Medical Nutrition Therapy held on 26th to 27th November 2009, has been uploaded at the web site www.samchild.com

               

               

              You could also try the link http://www.samchild.com/ scientific/consensus.doc

               

              Further , We would like to inform you that  to sensitize the pediatricians regarding the recent trends, advances, recommendations and research related home based management of children with severe acute malnutrition, IAP   will be releasing a Special issue of Indian Pediatrics concentrating on research, recommendations, and viewpoints on home based management of severe acute malnutrition  which were discussed during the National Workshop on "Medical Nutrition Therapy in SAM" at AIIMS ,New Delhi ,on 26th and 27th  November 2009.




              Dr. Umesh Kapil,
              Professor , Public Health Nutrition,
              All India Institute of Medical Sciences ,
              New Delhi, 110029,
              India
              Mobile : 9810609340,
              Office 26593383
              Res: 26195105


              --- On Wed, 2/10/10, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@...> wrote:

              From: surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@...>
              Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers] Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians
              To: iapsm_youthmembers@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 1:46 AM

               
              Sending the link once again. It is working here with me.
               


               
              Thank you very much.
              Nikhil
              Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
              MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
              FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
              Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
              CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
              Pin-176001.
              01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
              Mobile: 094181-28634.
                                drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
               


              --- On Wed, 2/10/10, Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com> wrote:

              From: Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com>
              Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers ] Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians
              To: iapsm_youthmembers@ yahoogroups. com
              Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 11:51 AM

               
              The link says page not found.
               
              Does this article say that the the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased in India? Could you mention the figures?
               
              regards,
               
              rakesh

              On Wed, Feb 10, 2010 at 11:12 AM, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@ yahoo.com> wrote:
               
              The risk of hepatitis B infection is well documented among healthcare workers. Although with the use of hepatitis B vaccine the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased, there is still substantial scope for improvement, as many healthcare workers are unvaccinated. Therefore, there is a need for well-planned and clear policies for HBV screening and vaccination in healthcare workers, especially those who are at a greater risk of exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material.
               
               
              Thanks  
              Nikhil
              Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
              MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
              FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
              Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
              CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
              Pin-176001.
              01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
              Mobile: 094181-28634.
                                drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
               




            • Omesh Bharti
              Dear Sir,                Many many thanks for the link, it is very useful, I will share it with many.   Regads, Dr. Omesh Kumar Bharti
              Message 6 of 22 , Apr 20, 2010
              • 0 Attachment
                Dear Sir,
                               Many many thanks for the link, it is very useful, I will share it with many.
                 
                Regads,

                Dr. Omesh Kumar Bharti
                M.B.B.S.,D.H.M.,M.A.E.(Epidemiology)

                Directorate of Health Safety and Regulation,

                SHIMLA, Himachal Pradesh
                +91-9418120302

                bhartiomesh@...; bhartiomesh@...

                 

                --- On Tue, 20/4/10, Prof. Umesh Kapil <umeshkapil@...> wrote:

                From: Prof. Umesh Kapil <umeshkapil@...>
                Subject: [iapsm_youthmembers] Finalized National Consensus Statement of Workshop on Management of SAM Children through Medical Nutrition Therapy held on 26th to 27th November 2009
                To: iapsm_youthmembers@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Tuesday, 20 April, 2010, 4:57 PM

                 

                Dear  ALL

                 

                 

                We are happy to inform you that the Finalized National Consensus  Statement of  Workshop on Management of SAM Children   through Medical Nutrition Therapy held on 26th to 27th November 2009, has been uploaded at the web site www.samchild. com

                 

                 

                You could also try the link http://www.samchild .com/ scientific/consensu s.doc

                 

                Further , We would like to inform you that  to sensitize the pediatricians regarding the recent trends, advances, recommendations and research related home based management of children with severe acute malnutrition, IAP   will be releasing a Special issue of Indian Pediatrics concentrating on research, recommendations, and viewpoints on home based management of severe acute malnutrition  which were discussed during the National Workshop on "Medical Nutrition Therapy in SAM" at AIIMS ,New Delhi ,on 26th and 27th  November 2009.




                Dr. Umesh Kapil,
                Professor , Public Health Nutrition,
                All India Institute of Medical Sciences ,
                New Delhi, 110029,
                India
                Mobile : 9810609340,
                Office 26593383
                Res: 26195105


                --- On Wed, 2/10/10, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@ yahoo.com> wrote:

                From: surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@ yahoo.com>
                Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers ] Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians
                To: iapsm_youthmembers@ yahoogroups. com
                Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 1:46 AM

                 
                Sending the link once again. It is working here with me.
                 


                 
                Thank you very much.
                Nikhil
                Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
                MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
                FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
                Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
                CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
                Pin-176001.
                01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
                Mobile: 094181-28634.
                                  drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
                 


                --- On Wed, 2/10/10, Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com> wrote:

                From: Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com>
                Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers ] Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians
                To: iapsm_youthmembers@ yahoogroups. com
                Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 11:51 AM

                 
                The link says page not found.
                 
                Does this article say that the the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased in India? Could you mention the figures?
                 
                regards,
                 
                rakesh

                On Wed, Feb 10, 2010 at 11:12 AM, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@ yahoo.com> wrote:
                 
                The risk of hepatitis B infection is well documented among healthcare workers. Although with the use of hepatitis B vaccine the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased, there is still substantial scope for improvement, as many healthcare workers are unvaccinated. Therefore, there is a need for well-planned and clear policies for HBV screening and vaccination in healthcare workers, especially those who are at a greater risk of exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material.
                 
                 
                Thanks  
                Nikhil
                Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
                MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
                FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
                Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
                CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
                Pin-176001.
                01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
                Mobile: 094181-28634.
                                  drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
                 





              • Dr Tulika Goswami Mahanta
                Thank you Sir for sharing the important link which is becoming very useful for us. Tulika ... From: Prof. Umesh Kapil Subject:
                Message 7 of 22 , Apr 23, 2010
                • 0 Attachment
                  Thank you Sir for sharing the important link which is becoming very useful for us.
                  Tulika

                  --- On Tue, 20/4/10, Prof. Umesh Kapil <umeshkapil@...> wrote:

                  From: Prof. Umesh Kapil <umeshkapil@...>
                  Subject: [iapsm_youthmembers] Finalized National Consensus Statement of Workshop on Management of SAM Children through Medical Nutrition Therapy held on 26th to 27th November 2009
                  To: iapsm_youthmembers@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Tuesday, 20 April, 2010, 4:57 PM

                   

                  Dear  ALL

                   

                   

                  We are happy to inform you that the Finalized National Consensus  Statement of  Workshop on Management of SAM Children   through Medical Nutrition Therapy held on 26th to 27th November 2009, has been uploaded at the web site www.samchild. com

                   

                   

                  You could also try the link http://www.samchild .com/ scientific/consensu s.doc

                   

                  Further , We would like to inform you that  to sensitize the pediatricians regarding the recent trends, advances, recommendations and research related home based management of children with severe acute malnutrition, IAP   will be releasing a Special issue of Indian Pediatrics concentrating on research, recommendations, and viewpoints on home based management of severe acute malnutrition  which were discussed during the National Workshop on "Medical Nutrition Therapy in SAM" at AIIMS ,New Delhi ,on 26th and 27th  November 2009.




                  Dr. Umesh Kapil,
                  Professor , Public Health Nutrition,
                  All India Institute of Medical Sciences ,
                  New Delhi, 110029,
                  India
                  Mobile :  9810609340  9810609340 ,
                  Office 26593383
                  Res: 26195105


                  --- On Wed, 2/10/10, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@ yahoo.com> wrote:

                  From: surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@ yahoo.com>
                  Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers ] Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians
                  To: iapsm_youthmembers@ yahoogroups. com
                  Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 1:46 AM

                   
                  Sending the link once again. It is working here with me.
                   


                   
                  Thank you very much.
                  Nikhil
                  Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
                  MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
                  FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
                  Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
                  CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
                  Pin-176001.
                  01892-265472 (Fax);  01892-263472  01892-263472 (Office)
                  Mobile:  094181-28634  094181-28634 .
                                    drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
                   


                  --- On Wed, 2/10/10, Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com> wrote:

                  From: Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com>
                  Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers ] Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians
                  To: iapsm_youthmembers@ yahoogroups. com
                  Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 11:51 AM

                   
                  The link says page not found.
                   
                  Does this article say that the the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased in India? Could you mention the figures?
                   
                  regards,
                   
                  rakesh

                  On Wed, Feb 10, 2010 at 11:12 AM, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@ yahoo.com> wrote:
                   
                  The risk of hepatitis B infection is well documented among healthcare workers. Although with the use of hepatitis B vaccine the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased, there is still substantial scope for improvement, as many healthcare workers are unvaccinated. Therefore, there is a need for well-planned and clear policies for HBV screening and vaccination in healthcare workers, especially those who are at a greater risk of exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material.
                   
                   
                  Thanks  
                  Nikhil
                  Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
                  MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
                  FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
                  Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
                  CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
                  Pin-176001.
                  01892-265472 (Fax);  01892-263472  01892-263472 (Office)
                  Mobile:  094181-28634  094181-28634 .
                                    drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
                   





                • Prof. Umesh Kapil
                  Dear ALL   I am  posting this query   for responses  from the  IAPSM Youth Members group members .   Severe deficiency of vitamin A is known to produce
                  Message 8 of 22 , Jul 6, 2010
                  • 0 Attachment

                    Dear ALL

                     

                    I am  posting this query   for responses  from the  IAPSM Youth Members group members .

                     

                    Severe deficiency of vitamin A is known to produce corneal xeropthalmia / keratomalacia and blindness in children. In India the prevalence of clinical Vitamin A deficiency is presently limited to selected geographical pockets of the country , which are drought prone or belong to  very low socio-economic status. There has been virtual disappearance of keratomalacia, and a sharp decline in the prevalence of Bitot’s spots (1,2).

                     

                    The recent DEVTA trial conducted on one million children above 6 months of age in underprivileged rural areas of Uttar Pradesh, India, with relatively higher prevalence of clinical vitamin A deficiency, confirmed that there was no survival benefit of this intervention (3). The sample size of this trial is greater than all earlier studies pooled in the meta-analyses

                     

                     

                    Government of India is  continuing with a policy of Universal Supplementation of Vitamin A 200,000 International Units to all children 6-60 months of age every six months. We are definitely able to increase the serum retinol levels amongst children by administering mega dose of Vitamin A . However, we  do not have  scientifically robust data  on possible  health benefits achieved  amongst children  by increasing  their serum retinol levels. I post this query to members to share their views and experiences on following :

                     

                    • What are the health benefits  observed  amongst children after administration of mega dose of vitamin A
                    • What are the non - health benefits  of administering mega dose of Vitamin A amongst children
                    • What are the research needs and gaps existing in this area?

                     Your responses will help to develop a better understanding of this important issue . The information will also help in strengthening existing programme of National program for prevention of Nutritional Blindness due to Vitamin A deficiency.

                     

                    With regards,

                     

                    Dr. Umesh Kapil

                    Professor Public health Nutrition

                    All India Insitute of Medical Sciences

                    New Delhi, India 110029

                     

                     

                    1. Shah D, Sachdev HPS. Nutritional problems in children: Indian scenario. Pediatric Clinics of India 2001; 36: 1-23.
                    2. Toteja GS, Singh P, Dhillon BS, Saxena BN. Vitamin A deficiency disorders in 16 districts of India. Indian Journal of Pediatrics 2002; 69: 603-605.
                    3. Awasthi S, Peto R, Read S, Bundy D, Kourellias K, Clark S, Pande V, the DEVTA team. Six-monthly vitamin A from 1 to 6 years of age. DEVTA: cluster- randomized trial in 1 million children in North India. Results presented at First Micronutrient Forum meeting, Istanbul, April 2007. Available from: www.ctsu.ox.ac.uk/projects/devta/istanbul-vit-A-lecture.ppt

                     

                     


                    Dr. Umesh Kapil,
                    Professor , Public Health Nutrition,
                    All India Institute of Medical Sciences ,
                    New Delhi, 110029,
                    India
                    Mobile : 9810609340,
                    Office 26593383
                    Res: 26195105


                    --- On Wed, 2/10/10, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@...> wrote:

                    From: surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@...>
                    Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers] Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians
                    To: iapsm_youthmembers@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 1:46 AM

                     
                    Sending the link once again. It is working here with me.
                     


                     
                    Thank you very much.
                    Nikhil
                    Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
                    MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
                    FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
                    Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
                    CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
                    Pin-176001.
                    01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
                    Mobile: 094181-28634.
                                      drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
                     


                    --- On Wed, 2/10/10, Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com> wrote:

                    From: Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com>
                    Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers ] Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians
                    To: iapsm_youthmembers@ yahoogroups. com
                    Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 11:51 AM

                     
                    The link says page not found.
                     
                    Does this article say that the the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased in India? Could you mention the figures?
                     
                    regards,
                     
                    rakesh

                    On Wed, Feb 10, 2010 at 11:12 AM, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@ yahoo.com> wrote:
                     
                    The risk of hepatitis B infection is well documented among healthcare workers. Although with the use of hepatitis B vaccine the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased, there is still substantial scope for improvement, as many healthcare workers are unvaccinated. Therefore, there is a need for well-planned and clear policies for HBV screening and vaccination in healthcare workers, especially those who are at a greater risk of exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material.
                     
                     
                    Thanks  
                    Nikhil
                    Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
                    MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
                    FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
                    Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
                    CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
                    Pin-176001.
                    01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
                    Mobile: 094181-28634.
                                      drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
                     




                  • Prof. Umesh Kapil
                    For Information to all members   Regards   Umesh   Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2010 Nov 10;11:CD001996. Vitamin A supplementation during pregnancy. van den
                    Message 9 of 22 , Nov 25, 2010
                    • 0 Attachment

                      For Information to all members

                       

                      Regards

                       

                      Umesh

                       

                      Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2010 Nov 10;11:CD001996.

                      Vitamin A supplementation during pregnancy.

                      van den Broek N, Kulier R, Gülmezoglu AM, Villar J.

                      Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Pembroke Place, Liverpool, UK, L3 5QA.

                      Abstract

                      BACKGROUND: Vitamin A supplements have been recommended in pregnancy to improve outcomes that include maternal mortality and morbidity.
                       
                      OBJECTIVES: To review the effectiveness of vitamin A supplementation during pregnancy, alone or in combination with other supplements, on maternal and newborn clinical and laboratory outcomes.
                       
                      SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's specialised register of controlled trials (April 2002) and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (The Cochrane Library Issue 1, 2002).
                       
                       
                      SELECTION CRITERIA: All randomised or quasi-randomised trials evaluating the effect of vitamin A supplementation in pregnant women. The types of intervention included vitamin A supplementation alone or in combination with other micro-nutrients.
                       
                       
                      DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We assessed trials for methodological quality using the standard Cochrane criteria of adequacy of concealment. At least two review authors independently assessed the trials for inclusion and extracted data. We collected information on blinding, loss to follow-up, setting, number of women, exclusion after randomisation and follow-up as well as supplementation type, dose and frequency. The outcomes we sought included maternal and neonatal clinical and laboratory outcomes.
                       
                      MAIN RESULTS: Five trials involving 23,426 women were included. Because the trials were heterogeneous with regard to type of supplement given, duration of supplement use and outcomes measured, pooled results using meta analysis could not be performed. One large population based trial in Nepal showed a possible beneficial effect on maternal mortality after weekly vitamin A supplements. In this study a reduction was noted in all cause maternal mortality up to 12 weeks postpartum with Vitamin A supplementation (RR 0.60, 95% CI 0.37-0.97). Night-blindness was assessed in a nested case-control study within this trial and found to be reduced but not eliminated. Three trials examined the effect of vitamin A supplementation on haemoglobin levels. The trial from Indonesia showed a beneficial effect in women who were anaemic ([Hb] <11.0 g/dl). After supplementation, the proportion of women who became non-anaemic was 35% in the Vitamin A supplemented group, 68% in the iron-supplemented group, 97% in the group supplemented with both Vitamin A and iron and 16% in the placebo group. The two trials from Malawi did not corroborate these positive findings.
                       
                       
                      AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Although the two trials from Nepal and Indonesia suggested beneficial effects of vitamin A supplementation, further trials are needed to determine whether vitamin A supplements can reduce maternal mortality and morbidity and by what mechanism.

                      Dr. Umesh Kapil,
                      Professor , Public Health Nutrition,
                      Human Nutrition Unit,Old OT Block
                      All India Institute of Medical Sciences ,
                      New Delhi, 110029,
                      India 110029
                      Mobile :09810609340,
                      Office 911126593383;  Fax 911126588461 
                      www.samchild.com
                       


                      --- On Wed, 2/10/10, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@...> wrote:

                      From: surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@...>
                      Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers] Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians
                      To: iapsm_youthmembers@yahoogroups.com
                      Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 1:46 AM

                       
                      Sending the link once again. It is working here with me.
                       


                       
                      Thank you very much.
                      Nikhil
                      Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
                      MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
                      FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
                      Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
                      CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
                      Pin-176001.
                      01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
                      Mobile: 094181-28634.
                                        drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
                       


                      --- On Wed, 2/10/10, Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com> wrote:

                      From: Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com>
                      Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers ] Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians
                      To: iapsm_youthmembers@ yahoogroups. com
                      Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 11:51 AM

                       
                      The link says page not found.
                       
                      Does this article say that the the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased in India? Could you mention the figures?
                       
                      regards,
                       
                      rakesh

                      On Wed, Feb 10, 2010 at 11:12 AM, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@ yahoo.com> wrote:
                       
                      The risk of hepatitis B infection is well documented among healthcare workers. Although with the use of hepatitis B vaccine the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased, there is still substantial scope for improvement, as many healthcare workers are unvaccinated. Therefore, there is a need for well-planned and clear policies for HBV screening and vaccination in healthcare workers, especially those who are at a greater risk of exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material.
                       
                       
                      Thanks  
                      Nikhil
                      Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
                      MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
                      FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
                      Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
                      CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
                      Pin-176001.
                      01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
                      Mobile: 094181-28634.
                                        drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
                       




                    • Prof. Umesh Kapil
                      Dear All   FYI   Zinc deficieincy is gradually becoming a major micronutrient public health issue Regards Umesh Indian J Pediatr. 2011 Feb 12. [Epub ahead of
                      Message 10 of 22 , Feb 19, 2011
                      • 0 Attachment

                        Dear All

                         

                        FYI

                         

                        Zinc deficieincy is gradually becoming a major micronutrient public health issue

                        Regards

                        Umesh

                        Indian J Pediatr. 2011 Feb 12. [Epub ahead of print]

                        Magnitude of Zinc Deficiency amongst Under Five Children in India.

                        Kapil U, Jain K.

                        Department of Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi, 110029, India, umeshkapil@....

                        Abstract

                        OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of serum zinc deficiency in children of 6 months to 60 months of age.
                        METHODS: A community based cross-sectional study was conducted to collect the data to establish the prevalence of zinc deficiency in children in 6-60 months of age in five states namely, Uttar Pradesh(Northern region), Karnataka (Southern region), Orissa (Eastern region), Gujarat (Western region) and Madhya Pradesh (Central region) of the country. In each state, all the districts with ICDS scheme were enlisted and one district was selected with the help of Random number table (RNT). In each district, all the ICDS projects were selected and one ICDS project was selected with help of RNT. In the selected ICDS project, a cluster 5 Anganwadi centres (AWC) were selected. From the selected AWCs, three hundred children in the age group of 6-60 months were selected for the detailed study. A total of 1,655 subjects (836 males and 819 females) were included. The blood samples were collected from each child. The serum zinc estimation was done by atomic absorption spectrophotometer.
                        RESULTS: The overall prevalence of zinc deficiency in five states was 43.8% . The prevalence of zinc deficiency was highest in Orissa (51.3%), followed by Uttar Pradesh (48.1%), Gujarat (44.2%), Madhya Pradesh (38.9%) and Karnataka (36.2%).
                        CONCLUSIONS: The present study revealed a high prevalence of zinc deficiency in children belonging to Low Socio-economic Index (LSI) in India.

                        PMID: 21318393 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

                        Dr. Umesh Kapil,
                        Professor , Public Health Nutrition,
                        Human Nutrition Unit,Old OT Block
                        All India Institute of Medical Sciences ,
                        New Delhi, 110029,
                        India 110029
                        Mobile :09810609340,
                        Office 911126593383;  Fax 911126588461 
                        www.samchild.com
                         


                        --- On Wed, 2/10/10, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@...> wrote:

                        From: surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@...>
                        Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers] Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians
                        To: iapsm_youthmembers@yahoogroups.com
                        Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 1:46 AM

                         
                        Sending the link once again. It is working here with me.
                         


                         
                        Thank you very much.
                        Nikhil
                        Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
                        MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
                        FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
                        Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
                        CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
                        Pin-176001.
                        01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
                        Mobile: 094181-28634.
                                          drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
                         


                        --- On Wed, 2/10/10, Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com> wrote:

                        From: Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com>
                        Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers ] Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians
                        To: iapsm_youthmembers@ yahoogroups. com
                        Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 11:51 AM

                         
                        The link says page not found.
                         
                        Does this article say that the the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased in India? Could you mention the figures?
                         
                        regards,
                         
                        rakesh

                        On Wed, Feb 10, 2010 at 11:12 AM, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@ yahoo.com> wrote:
                         
                        The risk of hepatitis B infection is well documented among healthcare workers. Although with the use of hepatitis B vaccine the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased, there is still substantial scope for improvement, as many healthcare workers are unvaccinated. Therefore, there is a need for well-planned and clear policies for HBV screening and vaccination in healthcare workers, especially those who are at a greater risk of exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material.
                         
                         
                        Thanks  
                        Nikhil
                        Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
                        MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
                        FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
                        Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
                        CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
                        Pin-176001.
                        01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
                        Mobile: 094181-28634.
                                          drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
                         




                      • Prof. Umesh Kapil
                          Modified curriculum Community medicine   In the present format of medical education the information is provided to the students in disconnected pieces and
                        Message 11 of 22 , Jun 5 3:51 AM
                        • 0 Attachment

                           

                          Modified curriculum Community medicine

                           

                          In the present format of medical education the information is provided to the students in disconnected pieces and mostly looks out of context. It encourages mostly a passive approach and pays little emphasis on solving practical problems. Currently teaching in Community medicine is completed before the students have been thoroughly exposed to the allied clinical subjects (like Paediatrics, Obstretics, Dermatology and Medicine) resulting in inadequate understanding of health care problems and related health care delivery system and the national health programmes. This problem could be overcome by a having a standard curriculum by horizontal and vertical integration across various disciplines so that the student is able to collaborate information. This would also remove barriers amongst students from diverse backgrounds. The examination for CM should be conducted at the end of final year along with the related clinical subjects. To accomplish this, the objectives and core competencies to be acquired at the end of graduation in community medicine are mentioned in the curriculum below.

                           

                           

                          COMMUNITY MEDICINE

                           

                          LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

                          At the end of the course, the learner shall be:

                          1 Able to think epidemiologically, diagnose totally, treat comprehensively and be able to function as community and first contact physician at different levels of health care delivery in public and private sector.

                          2. Able to apply the clinical skills to recognize and manage common health problems including their physical, emotional and social aspects at the individual, family and community levels and deal with public health emergencies.

                          3. Aware of the physical, social, psychological, economic and environmental determinants of health and disease.

                          4. Able to identify, prioritize and manage the health problems of the community after making community diagnosis.

                          5. Able to perform as an effective leader of health team at primary care level.

                          6. Able to facilitate behavior change communication in the community and improve health care seeking behavior

                           

                           

                          To achieve this, the learner should:

                          1. Understand the principles of prevention and control of communicable and non communicable diseases
                          2. Participate actively in epidemiological studies to identify and prioritize health problems of the community, collect data, analyze, interpret, and apply relevant statistical tests, to make a report.
                          3. Participate actively in health care service for special groups like mothers, infants, under five children, school children, adolescents and elderly of rural, tribal, urban and slum dwellers.
                          4. Participate actively in investigation of outbreaks/epidemics of various diseases and other public health emergencies.
                          5.  Participate actively in implementation of National Health Programmes.
                          6.  Learn and practice principles of behavioural change communication, supervision, leadership, resource management, health information management, community participation and coordination, administrative functions etc.
                          7. Continuously upgrade his knowledge, attitude and skills in the subject.
                          8. Apply the principles of epidemiology for undertaking operational and basic research to strengthen health care.
                          9. Inculcate values like compassion, empathy to poor, rational and ethical practice, to ensure quality professional practice

                           

                          ·         Total duration of teaching: 9 Semesters (I to IX)

                          ·         Students will be introduced to the families in the community in the 1st yr and will continue till last yr.

                          ·         Minimum  working days : As per time slot

                          ·         Total number of teaching hours required for the discipline: 367 (according to current  plan)

                          (ü) Must know,(*) desirable to know

                          SL NO

                          Learning Elements

                          Department

                          (ü)

                          (*)

                          Desired competency level

                          Semester

                          /(hrs.)

                          Method of teaching

                          Method of assessment

                          Competency :The student should be aware of the basic concepts of health and disease  (­­­­­15 hours) FOUNDATION COURSE

                          1,2,3, 4, 5 , 6, 8,9 :1 hrs each; 7 in 3 hrs;  10 & 11 : 2 hr each

                          1.       

                          History of medicine

                          CM

                          (ü)

                          K

                          FOUNDATION- COURSE

                          ORIENTATION & DISCUSSION

                           SSA

                          2.       

                          Definition and concepts of Public Health.

                          CM

                          (ü)

                          K

                          - do-

                          ORIENTATION & DISCUSSION

                           SSA

                          3.       

                          Definition of health, holistic concepts of health including concept of spiritual health, appreciation of health as a relative concept, determinants of health.

                          CM

                          (ü)

                          K

                          -do-

                          CASE STUDY of a healthy and a sick individual

                          4.       

                          Characteristics of agent, host and environmental factors in health and disease and the multi factorial etiology of disease

                          Med/Paed/Derma

                           

                          (ü)

                          KH

                          -do-

                          HEALTH RELATED VIDEOS & DISCUSSION (WH0)/CASE STUDY HIV,TB,DM)

                          5.       

                          Understanding the natural history of disease

                          CM

                          (ü)

                          KH

                          -do-

                          Case study/Field visit

                          6.       

                          Application of interventions at various levels of prevention.

                           

                          CM

                          (ü)

                          KH

                          -do-

                          Lecture & Discussion

                          7.       

                          Understand the concepts, the principles of Health promotion and Education, IEC, Behavioral change communication (BCC)

                          CM

                          (ü)

                          KH

                          -do-

                          Lecture

                          8.       

                          Introduction to various health indicators.

                          CM

                          (ü)

                          K

                          -do-

                          Discussion on Census

                          9.       

                          Demographic profile of India and its impact on health

                          CM

                          (ü)

                          KH

                        • Prof. Umesh Kapil
                          39th National Annual Conference of Indian Association of Preventive and Social Medicine (IAPSMCON-2012)   Pre-Conference Workshop Case-Control Studies –
                          Message 12 of 22 , Jan 24, 2012
                          • 0 Attachment

                            39th National Annual Conference of Indian Association of Preventive and Social Medicine (IAPSMCON-2012)

                             

                            Pre-Conference Workshop

                            Case-Control Studies – Design, Conduct and Analysis

                             

                            Venue

                            Department of Preventive and Social Medicine,

                            Dr. Rajendra Prasad Government Medical College, Kangra, Tanda, Himachal Pradesh

                             

                            Sunday, 26rd February, 2012 – 09.30 pm. to 5.30 pm

                             

                             

                            Supported by: Public Health Foundation of India, New Delhi

                             

                            An initiative of the Epidemiological sub-committee of IAPSM

                             

                            Program Schedule

                             

                            Time

                            Topic

                            Resource faculty

                            09.30 am – 10.00 am

                            Registration

                            10.00 am – 10.30 am

                            Inauguration, Participants’ Introduction

                            10.30 am – 11.30 am

                            Case-control studies: Design issues

                            Prof. Sanjay Zodpey

                            11.30 pm – 12.00 noon

                            Tea-break

                            12.00 noon – 01.00 pm

                            How to conduct case-control study?

                            Prof. Sanjay Zodpey

                            01.00 pm – 02.00 pm

                            Lunch-break

                             

                            02.00 pm – 03.00

                            Analysis of case-control studies

                            Prof. Sanjay Zodpey

                            03.00 pm – 04.30 pm

                            Group work

                             

                            04.30 pm – 05.30 pm

                            Group work presentations

                            Participant interaction and feedback

                             

                             

                             

                             

                             

                             

                             

                             

                             

                            39th National Annual Conference of Indian Association of Preventive and Social Medicine (IAPSMCON-2012)

                             

                            Pre-Conference Workshop

                            Case-Control Studies – Design, Conduct and Analysis

                             

                            This course is intended for participants interested in learning about various issues involved in designing, conducting, analyzing, interpreting, writing, disseminating, and appraising case-control studies.

                             

                            The main objectives of the Workshop are as follows:

                             

                            ·         To strengthen the capacity and expertise of participants’ in conducting case-control studies,

                             

                            ·         To update the participants’ knowledge regarding advance techniques and methodology used in case-control studies,

                             

                            ·         To provide insight to the participants’ in understanding methodologic issues involved in case-control studies, and

                             

                            ·         To help participants to critically appraise published case-control studies.

                             

                            The approach will be less technical, with the minimal use of mathematics.

                             

                            No previous experience in conducting case-control studies is required and it would be accessible to post-graduate students, faculty members and public health professionals.

                             

                            The program schedule provided herewith is only a guide; some flexibility may be required to deal topics of interest to the group in greater depth.

                             

                             

                             

                            Prof. Sanjay P. Zodpey, MD, PhD

                            Resource Faculty - Pre-Conference Workshop on Case-Control Studies

                            Director – Indian Institute of Public Health, Delhi

                            Director – Public Health Education, Public Health Foundation of India, Delhi

                             

                             

                             

                             

                             

                             

                            Dr. Umesh Kapil,
                            Professor , Public Health Nutrition,
                            Human Nutrition Unit,
                            Old OT Block
                            All India Institute of Medical Sciences ,
                            New Delhi, 110029,
                            India 110029
                            Mobile :09810609340,
                            Office 911126593383;  Fax 911126588461 
                             
                             


                            --- On Wed, 2/10/10, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@...> wrote:

                            From: surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@...>
                            Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers] Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians
                            To: iapsm_youthmembers@yahoogroups.com
                            Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 1:46 AM

                             
                            Sending the link once again. It is working here with me.
                             


                             
                            Thank you very much.
                            Nikhil
                            Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
                            MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
                            FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
                            Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
                            CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
                            Pin-176001.
                            01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
                            Mobile: 094181-28634.
                                              drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
                             


                            --- On Wed, 2/10/10, Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com> wrote:

                            From: Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com>
                            Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers ] Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians
                            To: iapsm_youthmembers@ yahoogroups. com
                            Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 11:51 AM

                             
                            The link says page not found.
                             
                            Does this article say that the the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased in India? Could you mention the figures?
                             
                            regards,
                             
                            rakesh

                            On Wed, Feb 10, 2010 at 11:12 AM, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@ yahoo.com> wrote:
                             
                            The risk of hepatitis B infection is well documented among healthcare workers. Although with the use of hepatitis B vaccine the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased, there is still substantial scope for improvement, as many healthcare workers are unvaccinated. Therefore, there is a need for well-planned and clear policies for HBV screening and vaccination in healthcare workers, especially those who are at a greater risk of exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material.
                             
                             
                            Thanks  
                            Nikhil
                            Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
                            MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
                            FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
                            Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
                            CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
                            Pin-176001.
                            01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
                            Mobile: 094181-28634.
                                              drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
                             



                          • Prof. Umesh Kapil
                            An uncomfortable liaison Tue, 31 Jan 2012 10:19:00 +1100 United Nations organisations are more commonly embracing public-private partnerships with the food
                            Message 13 of 22 , Feb 2, 2012
                            • 0 Attachment

                              An uncomfortable liaison

                              Tue, 31 Jan 2012 10:19:00 +1100
                              United Nations organisations are more commonly embracing public-private partnerships with the food industry to address global hunger, micronutrient deficiencies, food insecurity and even to reverse rising rates of global obesity and lifestyle-related non-communicable diseases such as type 2 diabetes.  
                               
                               
                              However, this practice is making some public health advocates uncomfortable. 

                              These include Deakin University Research Fellow, Vivica Kraak, and her PhD supervisors at Deakin’s World Health Organisation (WHO) Collaborating Centre on Obesity Prevention - Professor Boyd Swinburn and Associate Professor Mark Lawrence - along with Dr Paul Harrison from Deakin’s School of Business.

                               

                              They are expressing caution and emphasise that these partnerships must be transparent and very clear about the terms of engagement among UN organisations such as UNICEF and the World Food Programme, international non-governmental organisations (NGOs), and transnational industry iconic brands including Nestle, The Coca-Cola Company, PepsiCo, Kraft Foods, McDonald’s Corporation and Yum! Brands.
                               
                               
                              “There are examples of positive collaborations and strategic alliances currently underway that involve government, UN multilateral organisations and food industry firms to address environmentally sustainable food packaging or poor nutrition," Vivica Kraak said.
                               
                              "Yet some in the public health and nutrition community are sceptical about governments and the UN system over-relying on market-driven solutions to address formidable public-health nutrition challenges that are on par with global climate change."

                              Kraak and her academic team published a lead article in the December 2011 issue of the UN Standing Committee on Nutrition’s SCN News special issue on Nutrition and Business: How to Engage?

                               

                               

                              The SCN is an international forum that promotes cooperation and harmonises nutrition-related activities across all UN organizations.  
                               
                              Their paper examined the accountability of public-private partnerships with food, beverage and restaurant companies to address global hunger, under-nutrition and obesity.
                              In the paper, Kraak and her collaborators found that an estimated US $20 billion dollars annually is needed to tackle both global malnutrition and to prevent rising obesity and NCD rates.  They acknowledge that public-private partnerships are a potential way to raise visibility about these pressing issues and to also generate vital funds or in-kind donations to address these problems.
                               
                               
                              Yet partnerships with food industry have been criticised for ineffectively managing inherent conflicts of interest and failing to establish mechanisms to protect public health goals from being co-opted by commercial interests.
                               
                               
                              “It’s hard to argue against UN organisations or NGOs partnering with McDonald’s Corporation, PepsiCo or Kraft Food to provide funds or expertise to address global hunger, vitamin A or iron deficiencies worldwide, or even to help international NGO such as Save the Children or the Red Cross International respond to nutrition-related emergencies such as the Indonesian tsunami or the earthquake in Haiti,” said Kraak.
                               
                               
                              “At the same time evidence suggests that these companies are not making substantial changes to their product portfolios to cut out fat, sugar and salt in processed foods and sugar-sweetened beverages, and they are not implementing comprehensive approaches to market healthy diets to children and adolescents worldwide even though these companies have been implicated in fuelling the global obesity pandemic."
                              Many transnational companies continue to lobby governments to reject legislating taxes on unhealthy foods or beverages and have spent millions of US dollars and European Union Euros to oppose government initiatives to implement traffic-light labelling programs on food products.
                              “Their strategies are reminiscent of how tobacco companies acted decades ago before they were sued through the US Master Settlement Agreement,” said Professor Swinburn, who is Director of the WHO Collaborating Centre for Obesity Prevention.
                              The UN Global Compact was launched in 1999 at the World Economic Forum as a way to stimulate private sector actions to support UN goals and serve as an alternative to international regulatory systems.
                              The Compact is the largest corporate citizenship initiative in the world that promotes 10 voluntary principles of responsible corporate citizenship to support human rights, labour, the environment and anti-corruption.  
                              Kraak and Deakin collaborators examined the signatory status of 15 global food, beverage and restaurant companies with UN system organisations to the UN Global Compact and voluntary corporate responsibility programs such as the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI).  
                              They found that the Compact and the GRI lack explicit principles supporting consumer health, and do not hold food companies accountable for their collective actions to promote good nutrition and wellness. While seven companies are signatories, eight transnational food and restaurant companies are not signatories to the Compact, including McDonald’s Corporation and Yum! Brands, which have partnered with UN organisations.

                              The researchers developed a benefit-risk decision making pathway tools for prospective partners to assess partnership compatibility before engaging with industry that is published in the October 2011 issue of Public Health Nutrition.

                              They also recommend that partners adopt systematic and transparent accountability processes to balance private commercial interests with public health interests, manage conflicts of interest, ensure that co-branded activities support healthy products and healthy eating environments, comply with ethical codes of conduct, and monitor and evaluate partnership outcomes.

                              Vivica Kraak, Professor Boyd Swinburn and Associate Professor Lawrence plan to share further research findings about the corporate responsibility programs of global food, beverage and restaurant companies at the forthcoming World Public Health Nutrition Association Congress in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil from April 27-30, 2012.      


                              Dr. Umesh Kapil,
                              Professor , Public Health Nutrition,
                              Human Nutrition Unit,
                              Old OT Block
                              All India Institute of Medical Sciences ,
                              New Delhi, 110029,
                              India 110029
                              Mobile :09810609340,
                              Office 911126593383;  Fax 911126588461 
                               
                               


                              --- On Wed, 2/10/10, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@...> wrote:

                              From: surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@...>
                              Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers] Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians
                              To: iapsm_youthmembers@yahoogroups.com
                              Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 1:46 AM

                               
                              Sending the link once again. It is working here with me.
                               


                               
                              Thank you very much.
                              Nikhil
                              Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
                              MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
                              FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
                              Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
                              CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
                              Pin-176001.
                              01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
                              Mobile: 094181-28634.
                                                drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
                               


                              --- On Wed, 2/10/10, Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com> wrote:

                              From: Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com>
                              Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers ] Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians
                              To: iapsm_youthmembers@ yahoogroups. com
                              Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 11:51 AM

                               
                              The link says page not found.
                               
                              Does this article say that the the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased in India? Could you mention the figures?
                               
                              regards,
                               
                              rakesh

                              On Wed, Feb 10, 2010 at 11:12 AM, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@ yahoo.com> wrote:
                               
                              The risk of hepatitis B infection is well documented among healthcare workers. Although with the use of hepatitis B vaccine the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased, there is still substantial scope for improvement, as many healthcare workers are unvaccinated. Therefore, there is a need for well-planned and clear policies for HBV screening and vaccination in healthcare workers, especially those who are at a greater risk of exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material.
                               
                               
                              Thanks  
                              Nikhil
                              Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
                              MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
                              FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
                              Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
                              CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
                              Pin-176001.
                              01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
                              Mobile: 094181-28634.
                                                drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
                               



                            • Prof. Umesh Kapil
                              Dr. Umesh Kapil, Professor , Public Health Nutrition, Human Nutrition Unit, Old OT Block All India Institute of Medical Sciences , New Delhi, 110029, India
                              Message 14 of 22 , Feb 2, 2012
                              • 0 Attachment


                                Dr. Umesh Kapil,
                                Professor , Public Health Nutrition,
                                Human Nutrition Unit,
                                Old OT Block
                                All India Institute of Medical Sciences ,
                                New Delhi, 110029,
                                India 110029
                                Mobile :09810609340,
                                Office 911126593383;  Fax 911126588461 
                                 
                                 


                                --- On Fri, 2/3/12, Prof. Umesh Kapil <umeshkapil@...> wrote:

                                From: Prof. Umesh Kapil <umeshkapil@...>
                                Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers] Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians
                                To: iapsm_youthmembers@yahoogroups.com
                                Cc: "1 1" <communitymedicine@yahoogroups.com>
                                Date: Friday, February 3, 2012, 12:40 AM

                                 

                                An uncomfortable liaison

                                Tue, 31 Jan 2012 10:19:00 +1100
                                 
                                United Nations organisations are more commonly embracing public-private partnerships with the food industry to address global hunger, micronutrient deficiencies, food insecurity and even to reverse rising rates of global obesity and lifestyle-related non-communicable diseases such as type 2 diabetes.  
                                 
                                 
                                However, this practice is making some public health advocates uncomfortable. These include Deakin University Research Fellow, Vivica Kraak, and her PhD supervisors at Deakin’s World Health Organisation (WHO) Collaborating Centre on Obesity Prevention - Professor Boyd Swinburn and Associate Professor Mark Lawrence - along with Dr Paul Harrison from Deakin’s School of Business.
                                 
                                They are expressing caution and emphasise that these partnerships must be transparent and very clear about the terms of engagement among UN organisations such as UNICEF and the World Food Programme, international non-governmental organisations (NGOs), and transnational industry iconic brands including Nestle, The Coca-Cola Company, PepsiCo, Kraft Foods, McDonald’s Corporation and Yum! Brands.
                                 
                                 
                                “There are examples of positive collaborations and strategic alliances currently underway that involve government, UN multilateral organisations and food industry firms to address environmentally sustainable food packaging or poor nutrition," Vivica Kraak said.
                                 
                                "Yet some in the public health and nutrition community are sceptical about governments and the UN system over-relying on market-driven solutions to address formidable public-health nutrition challenges that are on par with global climate change."
                                 
                                 
                                Kraak and her academic team published a lead article in the December 2011 issue of the UN Standing Committee on Nutrition’s SCN News special issue on Nutrition and Business: How to Engage?
                                 
                                 
                                The SCN is an international forum that promotes cooperation and harmonises nutrition-related activities across all UN organizations.  
                                 
                                Their paper examined the accountability of public-private partnerships with food, beverage and restaurant companies to address global hunger, under-nutrition and obesity.
                                 
                                In the paper, Kraak and her collaborators found that an estimated US $20 billion dollars annually is needed to tackle both global malnutrition and to prevent rising obesity and NCD rates.  They acknowledge that public-private partnerships are a potential way to raise visibility about these pressing issues and to also generate vital funds or in-kind donations to address these problems.
                                 
                                 
                                Yet partnerships with food industry have been criticised for ineffectively managing inherent conflicts of interest and failing to establish mechanisms to protect public health goals from being co-opted by commercial interests.
                                 
                                 
                                It’s hard to argue against UN organisations or NGOs partnering with McDonald’s Corporation, PepsiCo or Kraft Food to provide funds or expertise to address global hunger, vitamin A or iron deficiencies worldwide, or even to help international NGO such as Save the Children or the Red Cross International respond to nutrition-related emergencies such as the Indonesian tsunami or the earthquake in Haiti,” said Kraak.
                                 
                                 
                                “At the same time evidence suggests that these companies are not making substantial changes to their product portfolios to cut out fat, sugar and salt in processed foods and sugar-sweetened beverages, and they are not implementing comprehensive approaches to market healthy diets to children and adolescents worldwide even though these companies have been implicated in fuelling the global obesity pandemic."
                                 
                                 
                                Many transnational companies continue to lobby governments to reject legislating taxes on unhealthy foods or beverages and have spent millions of US dollars and European Union Euros to oppose government initiatives to implement traffic-light labelling programs on food products.
                                 
                                “Their strategies are reminiscent of how tobacco companies acted decades ago before they were sued through the US Master Settlement Agreement,” said Professor Swinburn, who is Director of the WHO Collaborating Centre for Obesity Prevention.
                                 
                                 
                                The UN Global Compact was launched in 1999 at the World Economic Forum as a way to stimulate private sector actions to support UN goals and serve as an alternative to international regulatory systems.
                                 
                                 
                                The Compact is the largest corporate citizenship initiative in the world that promotes 10 voluntary principles of responsible corporate citizenship to support human rights, labour, the environment and anti-corruption.  
                                Kraak and Deakin collaborators examined the signatory status of 15 global food, beverage and restaurant companies with UN system organisations to the UN Global Compact and voluntary corporate responsibility programs such as the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI).  
                                 
                                 
                                They found that the Compact and the GRI lack explicit principles supporting consumer health, and do not hold food companies accountable for their collective actions to promote good nutrition and wellness. While seven companies are signatories, eight transnational food and restaurant companies are not signatories to the Compact, including McDonald’s Corporation and Yum! Brands, which have partnered with UN organisations.
                                The researchers developed a benefit-risk decision making pathway tools for prospective partners to assess partnership compatibility before engaging with industry that is published in the October 2011 issue of Public Health Nutrition.
                                 
                                They also recommend that partners adopt systematic and transparent accountability processes to balance private commercial interests with public health interests, manage conflicts of interest, ensure that co-branded activities support healthy products and healthy eating environments, comply with ethical codes of conduct, and monitor and evaluate partnership outcomes.
                                 
                                 
                                Vivica Kraak, Professor Boyd Swinburn and Associate Professor Lawrence plan to share further research findings about the corporate responsibility programs of global food, beverage and restaurant companies at the forthcoming World Public Health Nutrition Association Congress in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil from April 27-30, 2012.      


                                Dr. Umesh Kapil,
                                Professor , Public Health Nutrition,
                                Human Nutrition Unit,
                                Old OT Block
                                All India Institute of Medical Sciences ,
                                New Delhi, 110029,
                                India 110029
                                Mobile :09810609340,
                                Office 911126593383;  Fax 911126588461 
                                 
                                 


                                --- On Wed, 2/10/10, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@...> wrote:

                                From: surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@...>
                                Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers] Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians
                                To: iapsm_youthmembers@yahoogroups.com
                                Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 1:46 AM

                                 
                                Sending the link once again. It is working here with me.
                                 


                                 
                                Thank you very much.
                                Nikhil
                                Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
                                MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
                                FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
                                Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
                                CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
                                Pin-176001.
                                01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
                                Mobile: 094181-28634.
                                                  drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
                                 


                                --- On Wed, 2/10/10, Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com> wrote:

                                From: Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com>
                                Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers ] Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians
                                To: iapsm_youthmembers@ yahoogroups. com
                                Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 11:51 AM

                                 
                                The link says page not found.
                                 
                                Does this article say that the the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased in India? Could you mention the figures?
                                 
                                regards,
                                 
                                rakesh

                                On Wed, Feb 10, 2010 at 11:12 AM, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@ yahoo.com> wrote:
                                 
                                The risk of hepatitis B infection is well documented among healthcare workers. Although with the use of hepatitis B vaccine the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased, there is still substantial scope for improvement, as many healthcare workers are unvaccinated. Therefore, there is a need for well-planned and clear policies for HBV screening and vaccination in healthcare workers, especially those who are at a greater risk of exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material.
                                 
                                 
                                Thanks  
                                Nikhil
                                Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
                                MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
                                FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
                                Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
                                CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
                                Pin-176001.
                                01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
                                Mobile: 094181-28634.
                                                  drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
                                 



                              • Prof. Umesh Kapil
                                DEAR ALL   THE FOLLOWING ARE  THE CONCLUSIONS  OF THE RECENT META-ANALYSIS  AND REVIEW  OF LITERATURE UNDERTAKEN FOR  GOVERNEEMNT   OF INDIA      
                                Message 15 of 22 , Dec 23, 2012
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  DEAR ALL
                                   
                                  THE FOLLOWING ARE  THE CONCLUSIONS  OF THE RECENT META-ANALYSIS  AND REVIEW  OF LITERATURE UNDERTAKEN FOR  GOVERNEEMNT   OF INDIA
                                   
                                   
                                   
                                  1. Vitamin A supplementation has NULL effect on:

                                     (i) All cause mortality in children between 6 to 59 months of age.
                                     (ii) Prevention of diarrhea
                                     (iii) Treatment of diarrhea.

                                  2.Preventive Zinc supplementation has NULL effect on:

                                    (i) All cause mortality in children below 5 years of age.
                                    (ii) Stunting

                                  We are of the opinion that these interventions should be removed from the list of potential interventions for these specific indications (listed above).

                                  3. In addition regarding the role of therapeutic feeding in altering distribution of children with low weight for height, we are of the opinion that at this  juncture there is paucity of Indian data and these estimates of effectiveness should be removed for the moment, at least till the Indian data from the current ongoing trials become available. We have strong views on the need to remove these estimates for children between median and minus three SD. If required, the data below -3SD could be considered for retention.
                                   
                                  4. Multi-micronutrient supplementation to pregnant women should be removed from the LIST India tool.
                                   
                                  "In a recent pooled analysis of 12 randomized controlled trials from developing countries [1], compared with control supplementation (mainly with iron-folic acid), multiple micronutrient supplementation was associated with a 22 grams increase in birth weight and 11% reduction in risk of LBW. However, there was an increased risk of excessively large babies prone to complications (13%), early neonatal mortality (23%) and perinatal mortality (11%) [2]. The current data are thus unconvincing for replacing supplementation of antenatal iron-folic acid with multiple micronutrients. It would therefore be prudent to focus on increasing the coverage of iron-folic acid supplementation rather than introducing multiple micronutrient supplements, which would also entail novel logistic and financial issues.
                                   
                                  1. Fall CH, Fisher DJ, Osmond C, Margetts BM. Maternal Micronutrient Supplementation Study Group. Multiple
                                  micronutrient supplementation during pregnancy in low income countries: a meta-analysis of effects on birth size and length of gestation. Food Nutr Bull. 2009;30 (4Suppl):S533-46.

                                  2. Ronsmans C, Fisher DJ, Osmond C, Margetts BM, Fall CH. Maternal Micronutrient Supplementation Study"
                                  Group. Multiple micronutrient supplementation during pregnancy in low-income countries: a meta-analysis of
                                  effects on stillbirths and on early and late neonatal mortality. Food Nutr Bull. 2009;30 (4 Suppl): S547-55.

                                   


                                  Dr. Umesh Kapil 

                                  Professor Public Health Nutrition 
                                  Room Number 118; 
                                  Human Nutrition Unit,
                                  Old OT Block,
                                  All India Institute of Medical Sciences 
                                  New Delhi,  India ,110029
                                  Mobile 91-9810609340

                                   
                                   


                                  --- On Wed, 2/10/10, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@...> wrote:

                                  From: surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@...>
                                  Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers] Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians
                                  To: iapsm_youthmembers@yahoogroups.com
                                  Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 1:46 AM

                                   
                                  Sending the link once again. It is working here with me.
                                   


                                   
                                  Thank you very much.
                                  Nikhil
                                  Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
                                  MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
                                  FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
                                  Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
                                  CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
                                  Pin-176001.
                                  01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
                                  Mobile: 094181-28634.
                                                    drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
                                   


                                  --- On Wed, 2/10/10, Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com> wrote:

                                  From: Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com>
                                  Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers ] Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians
                                  To: iapsm_youthmembers@ yahoogroups. com
                                  Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 11:51 AM

                                   
                                  The link says page not found.
                                   
                                  Does this article say that the the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased in India? Could you mention the figures?
                                   
                                  regards,
                                   
                                  rakesh

                                  On Wed, Feb 10, 2010 at 11:12 AM, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@ yahoo.com> wrote:
                                   
                                  The risk of hepatitis B infection is well documented among healthcare workers. Although with the use of hepatitis B vaccine the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased, there is still substantial scope for improvement, as many healthcare workers are unvaccinated. Therefore, there is a need for well-planned and clear policies for HBV screening and vaccination in healthcare workers, especially those who are at a greater risk of exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material.
                                   
                                   
                                  Thanks  
                                  Nikhil
                                  Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
                                  MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
                                  FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
                                  Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
                                  CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
                                  Pin-176001.
                                  01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
                                  Mobile: 094181-28634.
                                                    drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
                                   



                                • Prof. Umesh Kapil
                                  Coke and Nestlé fund PAHONews broke late last year that the Pan American Health Organization had accepted money from transnational food corporations,
                                  Message 16 of 22 , Apr 10, 2013
                                  • 0 Attachment

                                    Coke and Nestlé fund PAHO

                                    News broke late last year that the Pan American Health Organization had accepted money from transnational food corporations, including Coca-Cola and Nestlé, to support its work to prevent and control obesity and chronic non-communicable diseases. The report, available here, was issued by the global news agency Reuters. It began:

                                    'The Pan American Health Organization not only is relying on the food and beverage industry for advice on how to fight obesity. For the first time in its 110-year history, it has taken hundreds of thousands of dollars in money from the industry'.

                                    Identifying PAHO as the regional office of the World Health Organization for the Americas, the report continued: 'Accepting industry funding goes against WHO's worldwide policies. Its Geneva headquarters and five other regional offices have been prohibited from accepting money from the food and soda industries, among others. "If such conflicts of interest were perceived to exist, or actually existed, this would jeopardize WHO's ability to set globally recognized and respected standards and guidelines", said spokesman Gregory Härtl.

                                    'But…PAHO, based in Washington and founded 46 years before it was affiliated with WHO in 1948 – had different standards allowing the business donations. Even so, not until this February did PAHO begin taking industry money. Reuters found $50,000 from Coca-Cola, the world's largest beverage company; $150,000 from Nestlé, the world's largest food company; and $150,000 from Unilever…

                                    'The recent infusion of corporate cash is the most pointed example to date of how WHO is approaching its battle against chronic disease. Increasingly, it is relying on what it calls "partnerships" with industry, opting to enter into alliances with food and beverage companies rather than maintain strict neutrality'.

                                    Interviewed by Reuters, Association member Boyd Swinburn, co-director of the International Obesity Task Force, said: 'Food and beverage companies exert a huge influence on policies that affect the health of millions. Industry is buzzing all around… Even in things like nutrition guidelines, they're usually in the room at the policymaking table or buzzing around it and putting all sort of pressure on, bringing their huge conflicts of interest and their huge resources to it – and we're wondering why we don't get much public interest policy coming out'.

                                    The WHO response

                                    A prompt public response, available here, came from Margaret Chan (above, right), director-general of WHO Geneva. She stated: 'The Political Declaration of the High-level Meeting of the United Nations General Assembly on the Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases, agreed by global leaders at the UN General Assembly in 2011, called on the international community to undertake a series of actions. One of these actions was to call on the private sector to promote measures to implement WHO recommendations to reduce exposure to the risk factors which contribute to NCDs. The WHO Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity and Health commits WHO to hold discussions with the private sector'. But, she stated categorically: 'the Organization will not take money from private companies active infood and beverage production for work on NCD prevention and control'.

                                    Margaret Chan explained that formally, the branch of WHO for the Americas is AMRO, the Regional Office for the Americas, whereas PAHO, a separate legal entity, 'may have variations in policy'. Thus, she confirmed, 'In its capacity as PAHO, food and beverage manufacturers have contributed financially as part of a multi-sector forum to address NCDs'.

                                    Many public health and nutrition professionals were shocked and even scandalised by the Reuters report. So where did this leave the Pan American Health Organization? The report coincided with the final months of the term of office of Marta Roses Periago (above, left) as PAHO director. In the words of one of the signatories of the open letter below 'It seemed more appropriate to send a message of strong support and encouragement to the new director Carissa Etienne. Our letter also asks her on behalf of the public health and nutrition communities to state that the previous practice of accepting money and all other forms of support from conflicted industry and its associated organisations is now at an end'.


                                    Dr. Umesh Kapil 

                                    Professor Public Health Nutrition 
                                    Room Number 118; 

                                    Human Nutrition Unit,
                                    Old OT Block,
                                    All India Institute of Medical Sciences 
                                    New Delhi,  India ,110029
                                    Mobile 91-9810609340


                                     

                                     



                                    --- On Wed, 2/10/10, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@...> wrote:

                                    From: surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@...>
                                    Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers] Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians
                                    To: iapsm_youthmembers@yahoogroups.com
                                    Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 1:46 AM

                                     

                                    Sending the link once again. It is working here with me.
                                     


                                     
                                    Thank you very much.
                                    Nikhil
                                    Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
                                    MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
                                    FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
                                    Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
                                    CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
                                    Pin-176001.
                                    01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
                                    Mobile: 094181-28634.
                                                      drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
                                     


                                    --- On Wed, 2/10/10, Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com> wrote:

                                    From: Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com>
                                    Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers ] Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians
                                    To: iapsm_youthmembers@ yahoogroups. com
                                    Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 11:51 AM

                                     
                                    The link says page not found.
                                     
                                    Does this article say that the the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased in India? Could you mention the figures?
                                     
                                    regards,
                                     
                                    rakesh

                                    On Wed, Feb 10, 2010 at 11:12 AM, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@ yahoo.com> wrote:
                                     
                                    The risk of hepatitis B infection is well documented among healthcare workers. Although with the use of hepatitis B vaccine the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased, there is still substantial scope for improvement, as many healthcare workers are unvaccinated. Therefore, there is a need for well-planned and clear policies for HBV screening and vaccination in healthcare workers, especially those who are at a greater risk of exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material.
                                     
                                     
                                    Thanks  
                                    Nikhil
                                    Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
                                    MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
                                    FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
                                    Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
                                    CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
                                    Pin-176001.
                                    01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
                                    Mobile: 094181-28634.
                                                      drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
                                     



                                  • Jugal Kishore
                                    Dear Friends and colleague The recent report sent by Prof. Umesh Kapil indicates the severity of the issue. We are concerned about the public private
                                    Message 17 of 22 , Apr 10, 2013
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      Dear Friends and colleague
                                      The recent report sent by Prof. Umesh Kapil indicates the severity of the issue. We are concerned about the public private partnership approach to public health issues. All such partnerships may be conflict of interest and should be taken cautiously as evidence of good public health science. These big international organizations are now focusing more on curative and medical approach more than public health approach whether it is DOTS for TB, STDs, ART, Iron, Albendazole and now for mental disorders. It is right time to wake up for public health professionals.
                                      with best regards, 


                                      On Wed, Apr 10, 2013 at 9:50 PM, Prof. Umesh Kapil <umeshkapil@...> wrote:
                                       

                                      Coke and Nestlé fund PAHO

                                      News broke late last year that the Pan American Health Organization had accepted money from transnational food corporations, including Coca-Cola and Nestlé, to support its work to prevent and control obesity and chronic non-communicable diseases. The report, available here, was issued by the global news agency Reuters. It began:

                                      'The Pan American Health Organization not only is relying on the food and beverage industry for advice on how to fight obesity. For the first time in its 110-year history, it has taken hundreds of thousands of dollars in money from the industry'.

                                      Identifying PAHO as the regional office of the World Health Organization for the Americas, the report continued: 'Accepting industry funding goes against WHO's worldwide policies. Its Geneva headquarters and five other regional offices have been prohibited from accepting money from the food and soda industries, among others. "If such conflicts of interest were perceived to exist, or actually existed, this would jeopardize WHO's ability to set globally recognized and respected standards and guidelines", said spokesman Gregory Härtl.

                                      'But…PAHO, based in Washington and founded 46 years before it was affiliated with WHO in 1948 – had different standards allowing the business donations. Even so, not until this February did PAHO begin taking industry money. Reuters found $50,000 from Coca-Cola, the world's largest beverage company; $150,000 from Nestlé, the world's largest food company; and $150,000 from Unilever…

                                      'The recent infusion of corporate cash is the most pointed example to date of how WHO is approaching its battle against chronic disease. Increasingly, it is relying on what it calls "partnerships" with industry, opting to enter into alliances with food and beverage companies rather than maintain strict neutrality'.

                                      Interviewed by Reuters, Association member Boyd Swinburn, co-director of the International Obesity Task Force, said: 'Food and beverage companies exert a huge influence on policies that affect the health of millions. Industry is buzzing all around… Even in things like nutrition guidelines, they're usually in the room at the policymaking table or buzzing around it and putting all sort of pressure on, bringing their huge conflicts of interest and their huge resources to it – and we're wondering why we don't get much public interest policy coming out'.

                                      The WHO response

                                      A prompt public response, available here, came from Margaret Chan (above, right), director-general of WHO Geneva. She stated: 'The Political Declaration of the High-level Meeting of the United Nations General Assembly on the Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases, agreed by global leaders at the UN General Assembly in 2011, called on the international community to undertake a series of actions. One of these actions was to call on the private sector to promote measures to implement WHO recommendations to reduce exposure to the risk factors which contribute to NCDs. The WHO Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity and Health commits WHO to hold discussions with the private sector'. But, she stated categorically: 'the Organization will not take money from private companies active infood and beverage production for work on NCD prevention and control'.

                                      Margaret Chan explained that formally, the branch of WHO for the Americas is AMRO, the Regional Office for the Americas, whereas PAHO, a separate legal entity, 'may have variations in policy'. Thus, she confirmed, 'In its capacity as PAHO, food and beverage manufacturers have contributed financially as part of a multi-sector forum to address NCDs'.

                                      Many public health and nutrition professionals were shocked and even scandalised by the Reuters report. So where did this leave the Pan American Health Organization? The report coincided with the final months of the term of office of Marta Roses Periago (above, left) as PAHO director. In the words of one of the signatories of the open letter below 'It seemed more appropriate to send a message of strong support and encouragement to the new director Carissa Etienne. Our letter also asks her on behalf of the public health and nutrition communities to state that the previous practice of accepting money and all other forms of support from conflicted industry and its associated organisations is now at an end'.


                                      Dr. Umesh Kapil 

                                      Professor Public Health Nutrition 
                                      Room Number 118; 

                                      Human Nutrition Unit,
                                      Old OT Block,
                                      All India Institute of Medical Sciences 
                                      New Delhi,  India ,110029
                                      Mobile 91-9810609340


                                       

                                       



                                      --- On Wed, 2/10/10, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@...> wrote:

                                      From: surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@...>
                                      Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers] Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians
                                      To: iapsm_youthmembers@yahoogroups.com
                                      Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 1:46 AM

                                       

                                      Sending the link once again. It is working here with me.
                                       


                                       
                                      Thank you very much.
                                      Nikhil
                                      Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
                                      MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
                                      FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
                                      Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
                                      CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
                                      Pin-176001.
                                      01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
                                      Mobile: 094181-28634.
                                                        drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
                                       


                                      --- On Wed, 2/10/10, Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com> wrote:

                                      From: Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com>
                                      Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers ] Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians
                                      To: iapsm_youthmembers@ yahoogroups. com
                                      Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 11:51 AM

                                       
                                      The link says page not found.
                                       
                                      Does this article say that the the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased in India? Could you mention the figures?
                                       
                                      regards,
                                       
                                      rakesh

                                      On Wed, Feb 10, 2010 at 11:12 AM, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@ yahoo.com> wrote:
                                       
                                      The risk of hepatitis B infection is well documented among healthcare workers. Although with the use of hepatitis B vaccine the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased, there is still substantial scope for improvement, as many healthcare workers are unvaccinated. Therefore, there is a need for well-planned and clear policies for HBV screening and vaccination in healthcare workers, especially those who are at a greater risk of exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material.
                                       
                                       
                                      Thanks  
                                      Nikhil
                                      Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
                                      MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
                                      FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
                                      Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
                                      CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
                                      Pin-176001.
                                      01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
                                      Mobile: 094181-28634.
                                                        drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
                                       






                                      --
                                      Prof. Jugal Kishore
                                      MBBS, MD, PGDCHFWM, PGDEE, MSc., FIAPSM, FIPHA, FAMS,
                                      Department of Community Medicine, Maulana Azad Medical College, New Delhi-2
                                      Phone: 09968604249
                                      Executive Director (Hony): Center for Inquiry (India) 
                                      Secretary General: Indian Association for Adolescent Health
                                      Advisory Member: *International Mental Health Collaboration Network 
                                      (IMHCN)*
                                      President (Hony): Kishore Foundations, Sabasva Foundation,

                                      Editor (Hony): WebmedCentral (Public Health), Journal of Nursing Science and Practice, Research Review: Journal of Health Professions, Journal of Energy, Environment and Carbon Credit, Journal of Medicine,   

                                      Author of following books: 
                                      National Health Programs of India: National Policies and Legislations
                                      related to health; A Dictionary of Public Health; Practical and Viva of Community Medicine
                                      Question Bank Community Medicine; Textbook for Health Worker and Auxiliary Nurse Midwife  
                                      Inequity in India healthcare; Female feticide: An instigating of female status 
                                      Effect of educational booklet on depressions; How to prevent and manage your low back pain: A guide for health posture and and lifestyle; A Comprehensive Review of Community Medicine
                                      Biomedical Waste Management in India; Breastfeeding and college girls 
                                      A Pioneering Social Reformers of India; Great Warriers of Human Rights Movement From India;
                                      Vanishing Girl Child; Living With out God; Bhavnayen (An anthology of poems in Hindi)

                                      For my books please Visit http://centurypublications.co.in, http://centurypublications.blogspot.com 
                                      or contact: 09868010950

                                    • Prof. Umesh Kapil
                                      RESEARCH NEWS   Two surprise results from India’s biggest trial   BMJ 2013; 346 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.f1796 (Published 20 March 2013)  
                                      Message 18 of 22 , Apr 10, 2013
                                      • 0 Attachment

                                        RESEARCH NEWS

                                         

                                        Two surprise results from India’s biggest trial

                                         
                                        BMJ 2013; 346 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj. f1796 (Published 20 March 2013)
                                         
                                         

                                        In one of the biggest trials ever completed, vitamin A supplements failed to prevent deaths among preschool children in rural north India. The headline result was a surprise in this moderately deficient population, and the researchers spent years checking their data before finally putting it in print. Children in areas that were randomised to administer supplements every six months had almost the same death rate as those living in control areas (estimated mortality 2.5% v 2.6%; mortality ratio 0.96, 95% CI 0.89 to 1.03). Pooled analyses from eight previous trials had led researchers to expect a quarter fewer deaths in supplemented children and they can’t easily explain the discrepant result. Their trial comprised roughly two million children and contributed twice as much statistical power as all other trials put together.

                                        Either vitamin A doesn’t work or doesn’t work half as well as we believe it should, says a linked editorial (doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(13) 60600-5). It’s hard to say which at this stage, and the seven year delay before full publication hasn’t helped. The same trial reported a second unexpected result—regular deworming with albendazole didn’t reduce mortality either, or help preschool children gain weight.

                                        Results from both interventions have important policy implications for India and elsewhere, says the editorial. Publication delays were partly due to lack of resources, and funders must invest more heavily in these ambitious trials so researchers can publish promptly.

                                        Notes

                                        Cite this as: BMJ 2013;346:f1796



                                         

                                         
                                         


                                        --- On Wed, 4/10/13, Jugal Kishore <drjugalkishore@...> wrote:

                                        From: Jugal Kishore <drjugalkishore@...>
                                        Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers] Coke and Nestlé fund PAHO
                                        To: "iapsm_youthmembers" <iapsm_youthmembers@yahoogroups.com>
                                        Date: Wednesday, April 10, 2013, 12:36 PM

                                         
                                        Dear Friends and colleague
                                        The recent report sent by Prof. Umesh Kapil indicates the severity of the issue. We are concerned about the public private partnership approach to public health issues. All such partnerships may be conflict of interest and should be taken cautiously as evidence of good public health science. These big international organizations are now focusing more on curative and medical approach more than public health approach whether it is DOTS for TB, STDs, ART, Iron, Albendazole and now for mental disorders. It is right time to wake up for public health professionals.
                                        with best regards, 


                                        On Wed, Apr 10, 2013 at 9:50 PM, Prof. Umesh Kapil <umeshkapil@...> wrote:
                                         

                                        Identifying PAHO as the regional office of the World Health Organization for the Americas, the report continued: 'Accepting industry funding goes against WHO's worldwide policies. Its Geneva headquarters and five other regional offices have been prohibited from accepting money from the food and soda industries, among others. "If such conflicts of interest were perceived to exist, or actually existed, this would jeopardize WHO's ability to set globally recognized and respected standards and guidelines", said spokesman Gregory Härtl.

                                        'But…PAHO, based in Washington and founded 46 years before it was affiliated with WHO in 1948 – had different standards allowing the business donations. Even so, not until this February did PAHO begin taking industry money. Reuters found $50,000 from Coca-Cola, the world's largest beverage company; $150,000 from Nestlé, the world's largest food company; and $150,000 from Unilever…

                                        'The recent infusion of corporate cash is the most pointed example to date of how WHO is approaching its battle against chronic disease. Increasingly, it is relying on what it calls "partnerships" with industry, opting to enter into alliances with food and beverage companies rather than maintain strict neutrality'.

                                        Interviewed by Reuters, Association member Boyd Swinburn, co-director of the International Obesity Task Force, said: 'Food and beverage companies exert a huge influence on policies that affect the health of millions. Industry is buzzing all around… Even in things like nutrition guidelines, they're usually in the room at the policymaking table or buzzing around it and putting all sort of pressure on, bringing their huge conflicts of interest and their huge resources to it – and we're wondering why we don't get much public interest policy coming out'.

                                        The WHO response

                                        A prompt public response, available here, came from Margaret Chan (above, right), director-general of WHO Geneva. She stated: 'The Political Declaration of the High-level Meeting of the United Nations General Assembly on the Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases, agreed by global leaders at the UN General Assembly in 2011, called on the international community to undertake a series of actions. One of these actions was to call on the private sector to promote measures to implement WHO recommendations to reduce exposure to the risk factors which contribute to NCDs. The WHO Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity and Health commits WHO to hold discussions with the private sector'. But, she stated categorically: 'the Organization will not take money from private companies active infood and beverage production for work on NCD prevention and control'.

                                        Margaret Chan explained that formally, the branch of WHO for the Americas is AMRO, the Regional Office for the Americas, whereas PAHO, a separate legal entity, 'may have variations in policy'. Thus, she confirmed, 'In its capacity as PAHO, food and beverage manufacturers have contributed financially as part of a multi-sector forum to address NCDs'.

                                        Many public health and nutrition professionals were shocked and even scandalised by the Reuters report. So where did this leave the Pan American Health Organization? The report coincided with the final months of the term of office of Marta Roses Periago (above, left) as PAHO director. In the words of one of the signatories of the open letter below 'It seemed more appropriate to send a message of strong support and encouragement to the new director Carissa Etienne. Our letter also asks her on behalf of the public health and nutrition communities to state that the previous practice of accepting money and all other forms of support from conflicted industry and its associated organisations is now at an end'.


                                        Dr. Umesh Kapil 
                                        Professor Public Health Nutrition 
                                        Room Number 118; 
                                        Human Nutrition Unit,
                                        Old OT Block,
                                        All India Institute of Medical Sciences 
                                        New Delhi,  India ,110029
                                        Mobile 91-9810609340

                                         
                                         


                                        --- On Wed, 2/10/10, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@...> wrote:

                                        From: surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@...>
                                        Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers] Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians
                                        To: iapsm_youthmembers@yahoogroups.com
                                        Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 1:46 AM

                                         

                                        Coke and Nestlé fund PAHO

                                        News broke late last year that the Pan American Health Organization had accepted money from transnational food corporations, including Coca-Cola and Nestlé, to support its work to prevent and control obesity and chronic non-communicable diseases. The report, available here, was issued by the global news agency Reuters. It began:

                                        'The Pan American Health Organization not only is relying on the food and beverage industry for advice on how to fight obesity. For the first time in its 110-year history, it has taken hundreds of thousands of dollars in money from the industry'.

                                        Sending the link once again. It is working here with me.
                                         


                                         
                                        Thank you very much.
                                        Nikhil
                                        Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
                                        MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
                                        FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
                                        Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
                                        CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
                                        Pin-176001.
                                        01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
                                        Mobile: 094181-28634.
                                                          drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
                                         


                                        --- On Wed, 2/10/10, Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com> wrote:

                                        From: Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com>
                                        Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers ] Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians
                                        To: iapsm_youthmembers@ yahoogroups. com
                                        Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 11:51 AM

                                         
                                        The link says page not found.
                                         
                                        Does this article say that the the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased in India? Could you mention the figures?
                                         
                                        regards,
                                         
                                        rakesh

                                        On Wed, Feb 10, 2010 at 11:12 AM, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@ yahoo.com> wrote:
                                         
                                        The risk of hepatitis B infection is well documented among healthcare workers. Although with the use of hepatitis B vaccine the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased, there is still substantial scope for improvement, as many healthcare workers are unvaccinated. Therefore, there is a need for well-planned and clear policies for HBV screening and vaccination in healthcare workers, especially those who are at a greater risk of exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material.
                                         
                                         
                                        Thanks  
                                        Nikhil
                                        Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
                                        MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
                                        FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
                                        Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
                                        CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
                                        Pin-176001.
                                        01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
                                        Mobile: 094181-28634.
                                                          drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
                                         






                                        --
                                        Prof. Jugal Kishore
                                        MBBS, MD, PGDCHFWM, PGDEE, MSc., FIAPSM, FIPHA, FAMS,
                                        Department of Community Medicine, Maulana Azad Medical College, New Delhi-2
                                        Phone: 09968604249
                                        Executive Director (Hony): Center for Inquiry (India) 
                                        Secretary General: Indian Association for Adolescent Health
                                        Advisory Member: *International Mental Health Collaboration Network 
                                        (IMHCN)*
                                        President (Hony): Kishore Foundations, Sabasva Foundation,

                                        Editor (Hony): WebmedCentral (Public Health), Journal of Nursing Science and Practice, Research Review: Journal of Health Professions, Journal of Energy, Environment and Carbon Credit, Journal of Medicine,   

                                        Author of following books: 
                                        National Health Programs of India: National Policies and Legislations
                                        related to health; A Dictionary of Public Health; Practical and Viva of Community Medicine
                                        Question Bank Community Medicine; Textbook for Health Worker and Auxiliary Nurse Midwife  
                                        Inequity in India healthcare; Female feticide: An instigating of female status 
                                        Effect of educational booklet on depressions; How to prevent and manage your low back pain: A guide for health posture and and lifestyle; A Comprehensive Review of Community Medicine
                                        Biomedical Waste Management in India; Breastfeeding and college girls 
                                        A Pioneering Social Reformers of India; Great Warriers of Human Rights Movement From India;
                                        Vanishing Girl Child; Living With out God; Bhavnayen (An anthology of poems in Hindi)

                                        For my books please Visit http://centurypublications.co.in, http://centurypublications.blogspot.com 
                                        or contact: 09868010950

                                      • Saishankar Prathap
                                        No funds from food cos to combat NCDs: WHO Rema Nagarajan, TNN Dec 14, 2012, 03.38PM IST NEW DELHI: Beleaguered by repeated charges of taking money from the
                                        Message 19 of 22 , Apr 16, 2013
                                        • 0 Attachment

                                          No funds from food cos to combat NCDs: WHO

                                          Rema Nagarajan, TNN Dec 14, 2012, 03.38PM IST

                                          NEW DELHI: Beleaguered by repeated charges of taking money from the very industries whose products are causing non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancers, the World Health Organisation has declared that it does not accept funding from the food and beverage manufacturers such as Coke, Pepsi, Nestle or Kraft for work on NCD prevention and control.

                                          "The WHO Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity and Health commits WHO to hold discussions with the private sector, but the organisation will not take money from private companies active in food and beverage production for work on NCD prevention and control as implied by media articles," stated the organisation in a public statement.

                                          http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2012-12-14/delhi/35819660_1_ncds-private-sector-beverage



                                          On Wed, Apr 10, 2013 at 9:50 PM, Prof. Umesh Kapil <umeshkapil@...> wrote:
                                           

                                          Coke and Nestlé fund PAHO

                                          News broke late last year that the Pan American Health Organization had accepted money from transnational food corporations, including Coca-Cola and Nestlé, to support its work to prevent and control obesity and chronic non-communicable diseases. The report, available here, was issued by the global news agency Reuters. It began:

                                          'The Pan American Health Organization not only is relying on the food and beverage industry for advice on how to fight obesity. For the first time in its 110-year history, it has taken hundreds of thousands of dollars in money from the industry'.

                                          Identifying PAHO as the regional office of the World Health Organization for the Americas, the report continued: 'Accepting industry funding goes against WHO's worldwide policies. Its Geneva headquarters and five other regional offices have been prohibited from accepting money from the food and soda industries, among others. "If such conflicts of interest were perceived to exist, or actually existed, this would jeopardize WHO's ability to set globally recognized and respected standards and guidelines", said spokesman Gregory Härtl.

                                          'But…PAHO, based in Washington and founded 46 years before it was affiliated with WHO in 1948 – had different standards allowing the business donations. Even so, not until this February did PAHO begin taking industry money. Reuters found $50,000 from Coca-Cola, the world's largest beverage company; $150,000 from Nestlé, the world's largest food company; and $150,000 from Unilever…

                                          'The recent infusion of corporate cash is the most pointed example to date of how WHO is approaching its battle against chronic disease. Increasingly, it is relying on what it calls "partnerships" with industry, opting to enter into alliances with food and beverage companies rather than maintain strict neutrality'.

                                          Interviewed by Reuters, Association member Boyd Swinburn, co-director of the International Obesity Task Force, said: 'Food and beverage companies exert a huge influence on policies that affect the health of millions. Industry is buzzing all around… Even in things like nutrition guidelines, they're usually in the room at the policymaking table or buzzing around it and putting all sort of pressure on, bringing their huge conflicts of interest and their huge resources to it – and we're wondering why we don't get much public interest policy coming out'.

                                          The WHO response

                                          A prompt public response, available here, came from Margaret Chan (above, right), director-general of WHO Geneva. She stated: 'The Political Declaration of the High-level Meeting of the United Nations General Assembly on the Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases, agreed by global leaders at the UN General Assembly in 2011, called on the international community to undertake a series of actions. One of these actions was to call on the private sector to promote measures to implement WHO recommendations to reduce exposure to the risk factors which contribute to NCDs. The WHO Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity and Health commits WHO to hold discussions with the private sector'. But, she stated categorically: 'the Organization will not take money from private companies active infood and beverage production for work on NCD prevention and control'.

                                          Margaret Chan explained that formally, the branch of WHO for the Americas is AMRO, the Regional Office for the Americas, whereas PAHO, a separate legal entity, 'may have variations in policy'. Thus, she confirmed, 'In its capacity as PAHO, food and beverage manufacturers have contributed financially as part of a multi-sector forum to address NCDs'.

                                          Many public health and nutrition professionals were shocked and even scandalised by the Reuters report. So where did this leave the Pan American Health Organization? The report coincided with the final months of the term of office of Marta Roses Periago (above, left) as PAHO director. In the words of one of the signatories of the open letter below 'It seemed more appropriate to send a message of strong support and encouragement to the new director Carissa Etienne. Our letter also asks her on behalf of the public health and nutrition communities to state that the previous practice of accepting money and all other forms of support from conflicted industry and its associated organisations is now at an end'.


                                          Dr. Umesh Kapil 

                                          Professor Public Health Nutrition 
                                          Room Number 118; 

                                          Human Nutrition Unit,
                                          Old OT Block,
                                          All India Institute of Medical Sciences 
                                          New Delhi,  India ,110029
                                          Mobile 91-9810609340


                                           

                                           



                                          --- On Wed, 2/10/10, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@...> wrote:

                                          From: surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@...>
                                          Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers] Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians
                                          To: iapsm_youthmembers@yahoogroups.com
                                          Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 1:46 AM

                                           

                                          Sending the link once again. It is working here with me.
                                           


                                           
                                          Thank you very much.
                                          Nikhil
                                          Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
                                          MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
                                          FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
                                          Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
                                          CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
                                          Pin-176001.
                                          01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
                                          Mobile: 094181-28634.
                                                            drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
                                           


                                          --- On Wed, 2/10/10, Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com> wrote:

                                          From: Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com>
                                          Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers ] Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians
                                          To: iapsm_youthmembers@ yahoogroups. com
                                          Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 11:51 AM

                                           
                                          The link says page not found.
                                           
                                          Does this article say that the the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased in India? Could you mention the figures?
                                           
                                          regards,
                                           
                                          rakesh

                                          On Wed, Feb 10, 2010 at 11:12 AM, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@ yahoo.com> wrote:
                                           
                                          The risk of hepatitis B infection is well documented among healthcare workers. Although with the use of hepatitis B vaccine the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased, there is still substantial scope for improvement, as many healthcare workers are unvaccinated. Therefore, there is a need for well-planned and clear policies for HBV screening and vaccination in healthcare workers, especially those who are at a greater risk of exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material.
                                           
                                           
                                          Thanks  
                                          Nikhil
                                          Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
                                          MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
                                          FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
                                          Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
                                          CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
                                          Pin-176001.
                                          01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
                                          Mobile: 094181-28634.
                                                            drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
                                           




                                        • Prof. Umesh Kapil
                                          This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Find out more here BMJ Helping doctors make better decisions
                                          Message 20 of 22 , Sep 11, 2013
                                          • 0 Attachment
                                            This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Find out more here
                                            BMJ
                                            Helping doctors make better decisions
                                            Research News
                                            New safety concerns over supplement powders for infants in Pakistan
                                            BMJ 2013; 346 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmji2604 (Published 24 April 2013) Cite this as: BMJ 2013;346:f2604
                                            Lancet 2013; doi: 10. 1016/S0140-6736(13)60437-7
                                            Infants and young children given micronutrient powders had more bloody diarrhoea and more respiratory symptoms than controls in a recent trial from Pakistan, and the authors have called for a closer look at safety before distribution is scaled up. The World Health Organization already recommends the powders to help control iron deficiency anaemia in vulnerable children. The new trial tested sachets that contained iron; folic acid; and vitamins A, C, and D, with or without additional zinc.
                                            Children given daily powders mixed with weaning food between 6 and 18 months of age grew slightly but significantly more than controls who had no supplements (an extra 0.31 cm, 95% CI 0.03 to 0.59 for children given micronutrients without zinc; an extra 0.56 cm, 0.29 to 0.84 for those given micronutrients with zinc). They also had a lower prevalence of iron deficiency at 18 months (22.9% and 26.5% v 57%). However, mothers reported a significantly higher incidence of bloody diarrhoea in children receiving supplements, which corresponded to roughly one extra episode a year for every 12-13 children treated. Mothers of children in both treated groups also reported significantly more “chest indrawing” than mothers of controls. The micronutrient  powders didn’t increase the incidence of fever or hospital admissions for pneumonia.
                                            Researchers randomised 256 clusters of children in urban and rural areas of Pakistan. The children were poorly nourished at baseline, with high rates of stunting, wasting, diarrhoea, and respiratory infections. Fewer than half the participating families had piped drinking water. The researchers say the extra morbidity associated with micronutrient powders is new, worrying, and may not be worth the limited benefits.
                                            Notes
                                            Cite this as: BMJ 2013;346:f2604

                                          • Prof. Umesh Kapil
                                            DEAR ALL  THIS IS FOR YOUR COMMENTS AND DISSEMINATION  TO ALL COLLEAGUES UMESH KAPIL BMJ EDITORIAL Improving child survival through vitamin A supplementation
                                            Message 21 of 22 , Oct 9, 2013
                                            • 0 Attachment

                                              DEAR ALL 

                                              THIS IS FOR YOUR COMMENTS AND DISSEMINATION 
                                              TO ALL COLLEAGUES

                                              UMESH KAPIL

                                              EDITORIAL
                                              Improving child survival through vitamin A supplementation
                                              BMJ 2011; 343 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.d5294 (Published 25 August 2011)
                                              Cite this as: BMJ 2011;343:d5294
                                              3 October 2013
                                              The editorial by Thorne-Lyman and Fawzi in 2011, (1) referring to the meta-analysis of the impact of vitamin A supplements by Mayo-Wilson, Imdad and others, (2,3) has now become more important than ever. The DEVTA results, only informally available in 2011, have now been published, (4) with extensive implications; indeed, as the editorial (1) says: ‘… the null findings have left lingering questions. Is vitamin A supplementation effective?’. These results have been the subject of conflicting comments recently in the Lancet, e.g. (5,6). But a number of inferences that should be drawn from the compilation and analysis of the evidence from trials prior to DEVTA (2,3) help answer this lingering question, and have not received adequate attention. There are three key related points, which now point to the need to seriously consider concrete steps to move beyond 6-monthly vitamin A supplementation at unphysiological levels.
                                              First, the trend through time in reported impact on mortality of high dose vitamin A 6-monthly supplements (usually 200,000 IUs) is informative, but some important inferences are not being drawn. The original meta-analyses by Beaton et al (7) in 1993 drew upon the 8 studies available at that time, to estimate an average mortality reduction (in 12-59 month children) of 23%. The recent meta-analyses (2,3) drew on seven of these, and added a further nine. They concluded that the weighted average mortality finding (without DEVTA) was essentially unchanged. What they did not point out is that 89% of the weight in this average came from the seven pre 1993 trials; the remaining 9 trials, with 11% weight, not surprisingly had little effect on the calculation.
                                              Further, it was not pointed out that of the 16 results, 8 showed no significant impact; since 1993, only two of 9 showed impact. Thus what is being confirmed is that the early trials showed efficacy; but there is sparse evidence in the past 20 years for this still being so, and none for large scale effectiveness. It seems disingenuous to imply that these new analyses confirm the continuing efficacy of VAC supplements.
                                              Second, by not including the possibility of changing impact through time, the effect of major changes in disease patterns is ignored. The impact on mortality was estimated in the original trials as resulting from reducing deaths from measles and diarrhea; no other causes were significant. (7, p50) Measles has been greatly reduced, by successful immunization programs, since the 1990’s; and diarrhea deaths have fallen, with improved living conditions, use of health services, and of ORT.
                                               Although the mechanism for intermittent high-dose VACs to reduce mortality is not known, it is only established as being relevant in these two diseases (7). Thus it is to be expected that mortality impact, if still present, would be reduced. The negative results of DEVTA, and of the study referred to by Benn et al, (8) are thus also not surprising. Both of these investigations, refuting conventional wisdom, suffered extraordinarily long delays in publication, in the DEVTA case causing speculation that ‘undoubtedly, the fact that there was no apparent effect detected delayed publication’. (5) Benn et al have a similar view about their unpublished results.(8) It is also seems disingenuous to assert that VACs are ‘a proven life-saving intervention’, (9) as if this necessarily continues under changing conditions, and in countries where measles has been controlled and diarrhea prevention and treatment improved.
                                              Third, vitamin A deficiency (VAD) is measured by serum retinol, as recommended by WHO. (10) The prevalence of VAD is around 30% in poor countries and falling only slowly.(11) However, it is clear that 6-monthly high dose VAD has only a limited and transient impact on serum retinol, (12, refs 6-20) which is how vitamin A gets to target tissues. There are established effective methods for reducing VAD: frequent physiological intakes of vitamin A or precursors through improved diets, fortification, and/or low dose supplements; (12, refs 22-35) moreover this is considered safe in pregnancy, in contrast to VACs.
                                              So the question becomes: why has most of the attention been on VACs (13) (over 7 billion so far distributed), (14) of unproven effectiveness in operational programmes, when employing these other approaches would have a wider range of benefits, including addressing any residual impact on child mortality that VACs 6-monthly may be having?
                                              This would free up scarce resources now being used for VAC campaigns, which have considerable opportunity costs.(15) Improved diets, fortified foods, and multiple micronutrient provision would surely bring broader improvements in nutrition to more people, including reproductive aged women who are now largely excluded.
                                              John Mason, PhD[1], David Sanders MD[2], Roger Shrimpton PhD[1], Ted Greiner PhD[3].
                                              1) School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans
                                              2) School of Public Health, University of the Western Cape, South Africa
                                              3) Department of Nutrition, Hanyang University, South Korea.
                                              1 Thorne-Lyman A, Fawzi WW. Improving child survival through vitamin A supplementation. BMJ. 2011 Aug 25;343:d5294. doi: 10.1136/bmj.d5294. PubMed PMID: 21868480
                                              2 Mayo-Wilson E, Imdad A, Herzer K, Yakoob MY, Bhutta ZA. Vitamin A supplements for preventing mortality, illness, and blindness in children aged under 5: systematic review and meta-analysis. BMJ. 2011 Aug 25;343:d5094. doi: 10.1136/bmj.d5094. Review. PubMed PMID: 21868478; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3162042
                                              3 Imdad A, Herzer K, Mayo-Wilson E, Yakoob MY, Bhutta ZA. Vitamin A supplementation for preventing morbidity and mortality in children from 6 months to 5 years of age.Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2010 Dec 8;(12):CD008524. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD008524.pub2. Review. PubMed PMID: 21154399
                                              4 Awasthi S, Peto R, Read S, Richards SM, Pande V, Bundy D; DEVTA (Deworming and Enhanced Vitamin A) team. Population deworming every 6 months with albendazole in 1 million pre-school children in north India: DEVTA, a cluster-randomised trial.Lancet. 2013 Apr 27;381(9876):1478-86. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(12)62126-6. Epub 2013 Mar 14. PubMed PMID: 23498850; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3647147.
                                              5 Garner P, Taylor-Robinson D, Sachdev HS. DEVTA: results from the biggest clinical trial ever. Lancet. 2013 Apr 27;381(9876):1439-41. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(13)60600-5. Epub 2013 Mar 14. PubMed PMID: 23498851
                                              6 Sommer A, West KP Jr, Martorell R. Vitamin A supplementation in Indian children.Lancet. 2013 Aug 17;382(9892):591. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(13)60645-5. Epub 2013 Mar 22. PubMed PMID: 23528188
                                              7 Beaton, G., Martorell, R., Aronson, K., Edmonston, B., McCabe, G., Ross, A. & Harvey, B. (1993) Effectiveness of Vitamin A Supplementation in the Control of Young Child Morbidity and Mortality in Developing Countries. ACC/SCN State-of-the-Art Series, Nutrition Policy Discussion Paper No. 13. ACC/SCN, Geneva.http://www.unscn.org/layout/modules/resources/files/Policy_paper_No_13.pdf
                                              8 Benn CS, Fisker AB, Aaby P. Vitamin A supplementation in Indian children. Lancet. 2013 Aug 17;382(9892):593. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(13)61737-7. PubMed PMID: 23953380
                                              9 Mannar V, Schultink W, Spahn K. Vitamin A supplementation in Indian children.Lancet. 2013 Aug 17;382(9892):591-2. PubMed PMID: 23961552.
                                              10 Sommer A, Davidson FR; Annecy Accords. Assessment and control of vitamin A deficiency: the Annecy Accords. J Nutr. 2002 Sep;132(9 Suppl):2845S-2850S. PubMed PMID: 12221259
                                              11 UN Standing Committee on Nutrition. Progress in Nutrition. 6th Report on the World Nutrition Situation. UN-SCN, Geneva. 2010.http://www.unscn.org/files/Publications/RWNS6/html/index.html
                                              12 Mason JB, Ramirez MA, Fernandez CM, Pedro R, Lloren T, Saldanha L, Deitchler M, Eisele T. Effects on vitamin A deficiency in children of periodic high-dose supplements and of fortified oil promotion in a deficient area of the Philippines. Int J Vitam Nutr Res. 2011 Sep;81(5):295-305. doi: 10.1024/0300-9831/a000077. PubMed PMID: 22419200
                                              13 UNICEF. Vitamin A Supplementation: a Decade of Progress. 2007, New York.
                                              http://www.unicef.org/immunization/files/Vitamin_A_Supplementation.pdf
                                              14 Micronutrient Initiative. 20 Years of Progress. 2011/12 Annual Report. Ottawa.
                                              http://www.micronutrient.org/CMFiles/MI-AnnualReport1112-EN-web.pdf
                                              15 Doherty T, Chopra M, Tomlinson M, Oliphant N, Nsibande D, Mason J. Moving from vertical to integrated child health programmes: experiences from a multi-country assessment of the Child Health Days approach in Africa. Trop Med Int Health. 2010 Mar;15(3):296-305.
                                              Competing interests: None declared
                                              John B Mason, Professor
                                              David Sanders, Roger Shrimpton, Ted Greiner
                                              Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, 1440 Canal Street, Ste 2300, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA Orleans
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                                              © 2013 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd
                                               
                                               
                                              Dr. Umesh Kapil 
                                              Professor Public Health Nutrition 
                                              Room Number 118; 
                                              Human Nutrition Unit,
                                              Old OT Block,
                                              All India Institute of Medical Sciences 
                                              New Delhi,  India ,110029
                                              Mobile 91-9810609340

                                               
                                               


                                              On Tuesday, February 9, 2010 10:49 PM, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@...> wrote:
                                               
                                              Sending the link once again. It is working here with me.
                                               


                                               
                                              Thank you very much.
                                              Nikhil
                                              Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
                                              MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
                                              FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
                                              Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
                                              CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
                                              Pin-176001.
                                              01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
                                              Mobile: 094181-28634.
                                                                drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
                                               


                                              --- On Wed, 2/10/10, Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com> wrote:

                                              From: Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com>
                                              Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers ] Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians
                                              To: iapsm_youthmembers@ yahoogroups. com
                                              Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 11:51 AM

                                               
                                              The link says page not found.
                                               
                                              Does this article say that the the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased in India? Could you mention the figures?
                                               
                                              regards,
                                               
                                              rakesh

                                              On Wed, Feb 10, 2010 at 11:12 AM, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@ yahoo.com> wrote:
                                               
                                              The risk of hepatitis B infection is well documented among healthcare workers. Although with the use of hepatitis B vaccine the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased, there is still substantial scope for improvement, as many healthcare workers are unvaccinated. Therefore, there is a need for well-planned and clear policies for HBV screening and vaccination in healthcare workers, especially those who are at a greater risk of exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material.
                                               
                                               
                                              Thanks  
                                              Nikhil
                                              Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
                                              MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
                                              FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
                                              Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
                                              CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
                                              Pin-176001.
                                              01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
                                              Mobile: 094181-28634.
                                                                drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
                                               





                                            • Prof. Umesh Kapil
                                              Dear Colleague,   It is our great pleasure to invite you to participate in the 2nd International Workshop on Micronutrients and Child Health (MCHWS2014) is
                                              Message 22 of 22 , Apr 14, 2014
                                              • 0 Attachment
                                                Dear Colleague,
                                                 
                                                It is our great pleasure to invite you to participate in the 2nd International Workshop on Micronutrients and Child Health (MCHWS2014) is being held from 3rd to 7thNovember 2014 at Jawaharlal Nehru Auditorium, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.
                                                 
                                                The International Workshop is jointly organized by i) Department of Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, ii) Indian Academy of Pediatrics (Sub-Speciality Chapter on Nutrition), New Delhi, and iii) Sitaram Bhartia Institute of Science and Research, New Delhi, India.
                                                 
                                                The eminent National and International scientists who are working in the field of Micronutrients and Child Health will be delivering “State of Art” Presentations. After each presentation, in-depth deliberations will be held, to discuss the issues raised by the eminent scientists and participants.
                                                 
                                                The presentations and discussions on Magnitude of the deficiencies of Iron, Iodine, Vitamin A, Zinc, Vitamin D, Vitamin B12, Folic Acid, Fluorine, Vitamin B-6 etc., their Health Consequences, Methodology for their Assessments, Strategies for Prevention and Control; Supplementation of micronutrients to reduce Child Morbidity and Mortality, Food Fortification, Multiple Micronutrient Supplementation to Pregnant Mothers, Double Fortified Salt, Multiple Micronutrient Supplementation to Children,  Sprinklers in Control of Anemia, Calcium supplementation and Maternal Mortality, Genetic Modified foods and related issues will be held. 
                                                 
                                                The International Workshop is being organised on Self Sustaining Basis and hence all the participants are required to be registered.
                                                 
                                                Please visit  International Workshop web site >www.mchws2014.com< for details.
                                                 
                                                We look forward to welcome you for 2nd International Workshop on Micronutrients and Child Health and make this event a grand success.
                                                 
                                                With Personal Regards 
                                                Dr. Umesh Kapil ,Professor Public Health Nutrition
                                                Human Nutrition Unit
                                                Room Number 118; 
                                                Old OT Block,
                                                All India Institute of Medical Sciences 
                                                New Delhi,  India ,110029
                                                Mobile 91-9810609340; 01126588058

                                                For details of 
                                                “2nd International Congress on Micronutrients and Child Health  (MCHWS2014)” 
                                                 
                                                 
                                                Dr. Umesh Kapil 
                                                Professor Public Health Nutrition 
                                                Room No. 118;
                                                Human Nutrition Unit,
                                                Old OT Block,All India Institute of Medical Sciences New Delhi,  India ,110029
                                                Mobile 91-9810609340
                                                For details of “2nd International Congress on Micronutrients and Child Health  (MCHWS2014) Ple ase Visit Website >www.mchws2014.com < 
                                                 
                                                 
                                                On Tuesday, February 9, 2010 10:49 PM, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@...> wrote:
                                                 
                                                Sending the link once again. It is working here with me.
                                                 


                                                 
                                                Thank you very much.
                                                Nikhil
                                                Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
                                                MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
                                                FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
                                                Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
                                                CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
                                                Pin-176001.
                                                01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
                                                Mobile: 094181-28634.
                                                                  drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
                                                 


                                                --- On Wed, 2/10/10, Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com> wrote:

                                                From: Rakesh Biswas <rakesh7biswas@ gmail.com>
                                                Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers ] Hepatitis B in health care workers: Indian scenario-J Lab Physicians
                                                To: iapsm_youthmembers@ yahoogroups. com
                                                Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 11:51 AM

                                                 
                                                The link says page not found.
                                                 
                                                Does this article say that the the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased in India? Could you mention the figures?
                                                 
                                                regards,
                                                 
                                                rakesh

                                                On Wed, Feb 10, 2010 at 11:12 AM, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@ yahoo.com> wrote:
                                                 
                                                The risk of hepatitis B infection is well documented among healthcare workers. Although with the use of hepatitis B vaccine the incidence of HBV infection in HCWs has decreased, there is still substantial scope for improvement, as many healthcare workers are unvaccinated. Therefore, there is a need for well-planned and clear policies for HBV screening and vaccination in healthcare workers, especially those who are at a greater risk of exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material.
                                                 
                                                 
                                                Thanks  
                                                Nikhil
                                                Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
                                                MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
                                                FAIMS;FIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
                                                Faculty, Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
                                                CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
                                                Pin-176001.
                                                01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
                                                Mobile: 094181-28634.
                                                                  drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
                                                 





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