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Target-driven docs have little cure

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  • surendernikhil gupta
    The conditions in mercurial materialism have started deteriorating upto this extent that even our colleagues donot spare the junior ones, especially in the so
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 1, 2009
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      The conditions in mercurial materialism have started deteriorating upto this extent that even our colleagues donot spare the junior ones, especially in the so callled big cities. I have an experience of visiting our medical college very senior teacher (Ex) for an expert obstretical opinion for the wife of a close friend.We used to keep him in high esteem for his outspoken opinion. The patient was having her second pregnancy in 2nd trimester  with moderate grade anemia. We did not find anything abnormal. It was a routine check up.
       
      But we were wonder struck when we had his melodramatic mannerisms depicting the grave conditions of the patient, warranting immediate hospitalization in XX hospital and so on and so forth.
       
      I,especially personally felt ashamed to consult the gentleman. I could not help telling my senior teacher bluntly in one sentence. Money is important but no melodrama, Sir. Four chapptis in life and two handful of ashes in death-That is all.
       
      Such dramas can not last longer.Truth has the birthright to emerge out. “I am referring a brain dead patient to you. I have made enough money from him, now you can keep him for a few days,” is his request.
       
      I can quote many examples now unfortuantely.

       

      http://www.tribuneindia.com/2009/20091101/main7.htm

       

      Patients or victims? — PART II
      Target-driven docs have little cure
      Chitleen K Sethi
      Tribune News Service

      Chandigarh, October 31
      A private doctor in Baddi calls up his medical college classmate serving in a private hospital in Mohali. “I am referring a brain dead patient to you. I have made enough money from him, now you can keep him for a few days,” is his request.

      What has happened to the Hippocratic oath, one wonders.

      Doctors working towards meeting “targets” are almost every corporate hospital’s success mantra. The salary of a doctor, his promotion, his foreign trips, his media exposure can all depend on the number of surgeries he performs, stents he implants, tests he prescribes...or in other words how “lucrative” he is to the organisation.

      “It is said about a cardiac hospital here that one should never go to them towards the month-end when doctors are under tremendous pressure to meet targets. There is a possibility of their operating on perfectly healthy persons,” said a Mohali resident.

      Such “target doctors” are paid a certain amount as retainership for a fixed number of procedures. If the doctor is unable to bring in this minimum number of patients, his retainership is liable to be reduced accordingly. In some hospitals, this target is fixed for the whole year but in some cases it has to be met each month. And if a doctor wishes to earn beyond his retainership, he has to somehow get more patients.

      “The result invariably is that gullible patients going for out-patient check-ups for minor problems end up being told how serious their condition was and how important it was to get admitted. Once the patient is admitted, he is the goose that would lay a golden egg everyday for the hospital,” said a doctor working in one such hospital. Other than “target doctors”, hospitals also have medical officers employed on fixed salary. They are generally ill-paid and in several cases not even proficient. Hospitals are known to have on their rolls doctors with questionable degrees and even unrecognised degrees. An allopathic hospital here has Ayurveda doctors working for it as senior residents.

      Yet another category of doctors in private hospitals is the “consultants” category. They are not on the rolls of the hospital but are merely associated with them. The understanding with them varies from hospital to hospital but most of them allege that while the patient is charged a large amount as “consultant fee”, what they get from the hospital is slashed to 30 per cent of what the patient has paid.

      Doctors working privately are otherwise rarely on the receiving end. Pharmaceutical companies offer them the world to convince them to prescribe their medicines and starting from the television, the fridge, the washing machine, down to the pen they are using are “gifts” from companies. For doctors with higher “prescription capacity”, foreign trips, attendance to international conferences, memberships to exclusive clubs are provided for by these companies. Interestingly, such medicines are rarely available beyond the drug store within the hospital or clinic. 

       
      Thank you very much.
      With warm personal regards,
       
      Nikhil
      Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
      MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH;PGCHFWM;
      FAIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
      Faculty cum Epidemiologist,
      Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
      CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
      Pin-176001.
      01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
      Mobile: 094181-28634.
                       drnikhilsurender@...
       

    • Dr. Pradeep Kasar
      I am referring a brain dead patient to you. I have made enough money from him, now you can keep him for a few days,”  This happening every where  in all
      Message 2 of 7 , Nov 1, 2009
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        I am referring a brain dead patient to you. I have made enough money from him, now you can keep him for a few days,” 

        This happening every where  in all city where Medical College , even in district Hospital they send brain dead patient, I had been Medical Superintendent In MCH Jabalpur  review brain dead patient admitted in ICU many times.

        Dr. P.K.Kasar

        Professor & Head 

        Department of Community Medicine

        NSCB Medical College Jabalpur

        kasarpk@... & kasarpk@...

        communitymedicinejabalpur@...

        9425359504, 07612671727 (Res),  07612673973 (Fax)


        --- On Sun, 1/11/09, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@...> wrote:

        From: surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@...>
        Subject: [iapsm_youthmembers] Target-driven docs have little cure
        To: "allindiamdmsdoctorsassociation" <allindiamdmsdoctorsassociation@yahoogroups.com>, "Diseasesurveillance group" <diseasesurveillance@yahoogroups.com>, "Hospital management" <hosp_admn_india@yahoogroups.com>, "IAPSM" <iapsm_youthmembers@yahoogroups.com>, "ifanet india" <ifanet-india@...>, "reprohealth_india" <reprohealth_india-subscribe@yahoogroups.com>
        Cc: "alt_health_india" <alt_health_india@yahoogroups.com>, "issuesonline" <issuesonline_worldwide@yahoogroups.com>, "humanrightsactivist" <humanrightsactivist@yahoogroups.com>, "PU CHDProf Amarnath Gill" <amarnathgill@...>
        Date: Sunday, 1 November, 2009, 3:00 PM

         

        The conditions in mercurial materialism have started deteriorating upto this extent that even our colleagues donot spare the junior ones, especially in the so callled big cities. I have an experience of visiting our medical college very senior teacher (Ex) for an expert obstretical opinion for the wife of a close friend.We used to keep him in high esteem for his outspoken opinion. The patient was having her second pregnancy in 2nd trimester  with moderate grade anemia. We did not find anything abnormal. It was a routine check up.
         
        But we were wonder struck when we had his melodramatic mannerisms depicting the grave conditions of the patient, warranting immediate hospitalization in XX hospital and so on and so forth.
         
        I,especially personally felt ashamed to consult the gentleman. I could not help telling my senior teacher bluntly in one sentence. Money is important but no melodrama, Sir. Four chapptis in life and two handful of ashes in death-That is all.
         
        Such dramas can not last longer.Truth has the birthright to emerge out. “I am referring a brain dead patient to you. I have made enough money from him, now you can keep him for a few days,” is his request.
         
        I can quote many examples now unfortuantely.

         

        http://www.tribunei ndia.com/ 2009/20091101/ main7.htm

         

        Patients or victims? — PART II
        Target-driven docs have little cure
        Chitleen K Sethi
        Tribune News Service

        Chandigarh, October 31
        A private doctor in Baddi calls up his medical college classmate serving in a private hospital in Mohali. “I am referring a brain dead patient to you. I have made enough money from him, now you can keep him for a few days,” is his request.

        What has happened to the Hippocratic oath, one wonders.

        Doctors working towards meeting “targets” are almost every corporate hospital’s success mantra. The salary of a doctor, his promotion, his foreign trips, his media exposure can all depend on the number of surgeries he performs, stents he implants, tests he prescribes.. .or in other words how “lucrative” he is to the organisation.

        “It is said about a cardiac hospital here that one should never go to them towards the month-end when doctors are under tremendous pressure to meet targets. There is a possibility of their operating on perfectly healthy persons,” said a Mohali resident.

        Such “target doctors” are paid a certain amount as retainership for a fixed number of procedures. If the doctor is unable to bring in this minimum number of patients, his retainership is liable to be reduced accordingly. In some hospitals, this target is fixed for the whole year but in some cases it has to be met each month. And if a doctor wishes to earn beyond his retainership, he has to somehow get more patients.

        “The result invariably is that gullible patients going for out-patient check-ups for minor problems end up being told how serious their condition was and how important it was to get admitted. Once the patient is admitted, he is the goose that would lay a golden egg everyday for the hospital,” said a doctor working in one such hospital. Other than “target doctors”, hospitals also have medical officers employed on fixed salary. They are generally ill-paid and in several cases not even proficient. Hospitals are known to have on their rolls doctors with questionable degrees and even unrecognised degrees. An allopathic hospital here has Ayurveda doctors working for it as senior residents.

        Yet another category of doctors in private hospitals is the “consultants” category. They are not on the rolls of the hospital but are merely associated with them. The understanding with them varies from hospital to hospital but most of them allege that while the patient is charged a large amount as “consultant fee”, what they get from the hospital is slashed to 30 per cent of what the patient has paid.

        Doctors working privately are otherwise rarely on the receiving end. Pharmaceutical companies offer them the world to convince them to prescribe their medicines and starting from the television, the fridge, the washing machine, down to the pen they are using are “gifts” from companies. For doctors with higher “prescription capacity”, foreign trips, attendance to international conferences, memberships to exclusive clubs are provided for by these companies. Interestingly, such medicines are rarely available beyond the drug store within the hospital or clinic. 

         
        Thank you very much.
        With warm personal regards,
         
        Nikhil
        Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
        MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
        FAIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
        Faculty cum Epidemiologist,
        Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
        CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
        Pin-176001.
        01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
        Mobile: 094181-28634.
                         drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
         



        Yahoo! India has a new look. Take a sneak peek.
      • surendernikhil gupta
        Review is not bad but the worse part is the money minting in disguise in corporate sector many times.    Nikhil Dr. Surender N. Gupta, MBBS;
        Message 3 of 7 , Nov 1, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          Review is not bad but the worse part is the money minting in disguise in corporate sector many times. 
           
          Nikhil
          Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
          MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH;PGCHFWM;
          FAIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
          Faculty cum Epidemiologist,
          Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
          CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
          Pin-176001.
          01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
          Mobile: 094181-28634.
                           drnikhilsurender@...
           


          --- On Sun, 11/1/09, Dr. Pradeep Kasar <kasarpk@...> wrote:

          From: Dr. Pradeep Kasar <kasarpk@...>
          Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers] Target-driven docs have little cure
          To: iapsm_youthmembers@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Sunday, November 1, 2009, 3:06 PM

           

          Department of Community Medicine

          NSCB Medical College Jabalpur

          kasarpk@yahoo. co.in & kasarpk@gmail. com

          communitymedicineja balpur@yahoo. in

          9425359504, 07612671727 (Res),  07612673973 (Fax)


          --- On Sun, 1/11/09, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@ yahoo.com> wrote:

          From: surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@ yahoo.com>
          Subject: [iapsm_youthmembers ] Target-driven docs have little cure
          To: "allindiamdmsdoctor sassociation" <allindiamdmsdoctors association@ yahoogroups. com>, "Diseasesurveillanc e group" <diseasesurveillance @yahoogroups. com>, "Hospital management" <hosp_admn_india@ yahoogroups. com>, "IAPSM" <iapsm_youthmembers@ yahoogroups. com>, "ifanet india" <ifanet-india@ googlegroups. com>, "reprohealth_ india" <reprohealth_ india-subscribe@ yahoogroups. com>
          Cc: "alt_health_ india" <alt_health_india@ yahoogroups. com>, "issuesonline" <issuesonline_ worldwide@ yahoogroups. com>, "humanrightsactivis t" <humanrightsactivist @yahoogroups. com>, "PU CHDProf Amarnath Gill" <amarnathgill@ gmail.com>
          Date: Sunday, 1 November, 2009, 3:00 PM

           
          I am referring a brain dead patient to you. I have made enough money from him, now you can keep him for a few days,” 

          This happening every where  in all city where Medical College , even in district Hospital they send brain dead patient, I had been Medical Superintendent In MCH Jabalpur  review brain dead patient admitted in ICU many times.

          Dr. P.K.Kasar

          Professor & Head 

          http://www.tribunei ndia.com/ 2009/20091101/ main7.htm

           

          Patients or victims? — PART II
          Target-driven docs have little cure
          Chitleen K Sethi
          Tribune News Service

          Chandigarh, October 31
          A private doctor in Baddi calls up his medical college classmate serving in a private hospital in Mohali. “I am referring a brain dead patient to you. I have made enough money from him, now you can keep him for a few days,” is his request.

          What has happened to the Hippocratic oath, one wonders.

          Doctors working towards meeting “targets” are almost every corporate hospital’s success mantra. The salary of a doctor, his promotion, his foreign trips, his media exposure can all depend on the number of surgeries he performs, stents he implants, tests he prescribes.. .or in other words how “lucrative” he is to the organisation.

          “It is said about a cardiac hospital here that one should never go to them towards the month-end when doctors are under tremendous pressure to meet targets. There is a possibility of their operating on perfectly healthy persons,” said a Mohali resident.

          Such “target doctors” are paid a certain amount as retainership for a fixed number of procedures. If the doctor is unable to bring in this minimum number of patients, his retainership is liable to be reduced accordingly. In some hospitals, this target is fixed for the whole year but in some cases it has to be met each month. And if a doctor wishes to earn beyond his retainership, he has to somehow get more patients.

          “The result invariably is that gullible patients going for out-patient check-ups for minor problems end up being told how serious their condition was and how important it was to get admitted. Once the patient is admitted, he is the goose that would lay a golden egg everyday for the hospital,” said a doctor working in one such hospital. Other than “target doctors”, hospitals also have medical officers employed on fixed salary. They are generally ill-paid and in several cases not even proficient. Hospitals are known to have on their rolls doctors with questionable degrees and even unrecognised degrees. An allopathic hospital here has Ayurveda doctors working for it as senior residents.

          Yet another category of doctors in private hospitals is the “consultants” category. They are not on the rolls of the hospital but are merely associated with them. The understanding with them varies from hospital to hospital but most of them allege that while the patient is charged a large amount as “consultant fee”, what they get from the hospital is slashed to 30 per cent of what the patient has paid.

          Doctors working privately are otherwise rarely on the receiving end. Pharmaceutical companies offer them the world to convince them to prescribe their medicines and starting from the television, the fridge, the washing machine, down to the pen they are using are “gifts” from companies. For doctors with higher “prescription capacity”, foreign trips, attendance to international conferences, memberships to exclusive clubs are provided for by these companies. Interestingly, such medicines are rarely available beyond the drug store within the hospital or clinic. 

           
          Thank you very much.
          With warm personal regards,
           
          Nikhil
          Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
          MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
          FAIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
          Faculty cum Epidemiologist,
          Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
          CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
          Pin-176001.
          01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
          Mobile: 094181-28634.
                           drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
           
          The conditions in mercurial materialism have started deteriorating upto this extent that even our colleagues donot spare the junior ones, especially in the so callled big cities. I have an experience of visiting our medical college very senior teacher (Ex) for an expert obstretical opinion for the wife of a close friend.We used to keep him in high esteem for his outspoken opinion. The patient was having her second pregnancy in 2nd trimester  with moderate grade anemia. We did not find anything abnormal. It was a routine check up.
           
          But we were wonder struck when we had his melodramatic mannerisms depicting the grave conditions of the patient, warranting immediate hospitalization in XX hospital and so on and so forth.
           
          I,especially personally felt ashamed to consult the gentleman. I could not help telling my senior teacher bluntly in one sentence. Money is important but no melodrama, Sir. Four chapptis in life and two handful of ashes in death-That is all.
           
          Such dramas can not last longer.Truth has the birthright to emerge out. “I am referring a brain dead patient to you. I have made enough money from him, now you can keep him for a few days,” is his request.
           
          I can quote many examples now unfortuantely.

           




          Yahoo! India has a new look. Take a sneak peek.

        • Jugal Kishore
          Dear Dr. Surender N Gupta Current society is appreciating more to those who earn in million. You can find in magazines and in newspaper every fornightly high
          Message 4 of 7 , Nov 1, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            Dear Dr. Surender N Gupta
            Current society is appreciating more to those who earn in million. You can find in magazines and in newspaper every fornightly high about those personalities who are earning in crores. It must be pinching to Dorctors specially superspeciality experts who had put so much investment of life and still noever figure out to be great personality even at the national level.
             
            Another reason could be lack of ethical and moral education to medical doctors from the very beginig. Lack ok role models. 
             
             Anyway this is high time that we should include medical ethics and orientation of medical students to the scientific and humanistic approach to patients and their problems and ablility to identify all risk factors which can give rise to such inhuman medical practices. 
             
            Law also has some role which is again a challenging area.
              
            With kind regards.
             
            Dr. J Kishore
            On Sun, Nov 1, 2009 at 3:33 PM, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@...> wrote:
             

            Review is not bad but the worse part is the money minting in disguise in corporate sector many times. 
             
            Nikhil
            Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
            MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH;PGCHFWM;
            FAIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
            Faculty cum Epidemiologist,
            Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
            CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
            Pin-176001.
            01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
            Mobile: 094181-28634.
                             drnikhilsurender@...
             


            --- On Sun, 11/1/09, Dr. Pradeep Kasar <kasarpk@...> wrote:

            From: Dr. Pradeep Kasar <kasarpk@...>
            Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers] Target-driven docs have little cure
            To: iapsm_youthmembers@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Sunday, November 1, 2009, 3:06 PM


             
            I am referring a brain dead patient to you. I have made enough money from him, now you can keep him for a few days,” 

            This happening every where  in all city where Medical College , even in district Hospital they send brain dead patient, I had been Medical Superintendent In MCH Jabalpur  review brain dead patient admitted in ICU many times.

            Dr. P.K.Kasar

            Professor & Head 

            Department of Community Medicine

            NSCB Medical College Jabalpur

            communitymedicineja balpur@yahoo. in

            9425359504, 07612671727 (Res),  07612673973 (Fax)
            --- On Sun, 1/11/09, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@ yahoo.com> wrote:

            From: surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@ yahoo.com>
            Subject: [iapsm_youthmembers ] Target-driven docs have little cure
            To: "allindiamdmsdoctor sassociation" <allindiamdmsdoctors association@ yahoogroups. com>, "Diseasesurveillanc e group" <diseasesurveillance @yahoogroups. com>, "Hospital management" <hosp_admn_india@ yahoogroups. com>, "IAPSM" <iapsm_youthmembers@ yahoogroups. com>, "ifanet india" <ifanet-india@ googlegroups. com>, "reprohealth_ india" <reprohealth_ india-subscribe@ yahoogroups. com>
            Cc: "alt_health_ india" <alt_health_india@ yahoogroups. com>, "issuesonline" <issuesonline_ worldwide@ yahoogroups. com>, "humanrightsactivis t" <humanrightsactivist @yahoogroups. com>, "PU CHDProf Amarnath Gill" <amarnathgill@ gmail.com>

            Date: Sunday, 1 November, 2009, 3:00 PM

             
            The conditions in mercurial materialism have started deteriorating upto this extent that even our colleagues donot spare the junior ones, especially in the so callled big cities. I have an experience of visiting our medical college very senior teacher (Ex) for an expert obstretical opinion for the wife of a close friend.We used to keep him in high esteem for his outspoken opinion. The patient was having her second pregnancy in 2nd trimester  with moderate grade anemia. We did not find anything abnormal. It was a routine check up.
             
            But we were wonder struck when we had his melodramatic mannerisms depicting the grave conditions of the patient, warranting immediate hospitalization in XX hospital and so on and so forth.
             
            I,especially personally felt ashamed to consult the gentleman. I could not help telling my senior teacher bluntly in one sentence. Money is important but no melodrama, Sir. Four chapptis in life and two handful of ashes in death-That is all.
             
            Such dramas can not last longer.Truth has the birthright to emerge out. “I am referring a brain dead patient to you. I have made enough money from him, now you can keep him for a few days,” is his request.
             
            I can quote many examples now unfortuantely.

             

            http://www.tribunei ndia.com/ 2009/20091101/ main7.htm

             

            Patients or victims? — PART II
            Target-driven docs have little cure
            Chitleen K Sethi
            Tribune News Service

            Chandigarh, October 31
            A private doctor in Baddi calls up his medical college classmate serving in a private hospital in Mohali. “I am referring a brain dead patient to you. I have made enough money from him, now you can keep him for a few days,” is his request.

            What has happened to the Hippocratic oath, one wonders.

            Doctors working towards meeting “targets” are almost every corporate hospital’s success mantra. The salary of a doctor, his promotion, his foreign trips, his media exposure can all depend on the number of surgeries he performs, stents he implants, tests he prescribes.. .or in other words how “lucrative” he is to the organisation.

            “It is said about a cardiac hospital here that one should never go to them towards the month-end when doctors are under tremendous pressure to meet targets. There is a possibility of their operating on perfectly healthy persons,” said a Mohali resident.

            Such “target doctors” are paid a certain amount as retainership for a fixed number of procedures. If the doctor is unable to bring in this minimum number of patients, his retainership is liable to be reduced accordingly. In some hospitals, this target is fixed for the whole year but in some cases it has to be met each month. And if a doctor wishes to earn beyond his retainership, he has to somehow get more patients.

            “The result invariably is that gullible patients going for out-patient check-ups for minor problems end up being told how serious their condition was and how important it was to get admitted. Once the patient is admitted, he is the goose that would lay a golden egg everyday for the hospital,” said a doctor working in one such hospital. Other than “target doctors”, hospitals also have medical officers employed on fixed salary. They are generally ill-paid and in several cases not even proficient. Hospitals are known to have on their rolls doctors with questionable degrees and even unrecognised degrees. An allopathic hospital here has Ayurveda doctors working for it as senior residents.

            Yet another category of doctors in private hospitals is the “consultants” category. They are not on the rolls of the hospital but are merely associated with them. The understanding with them varies from hospital to hospital but most of them allege that while the patient is charged a large amount as “consultant fee”, what they get from the hospital is slashed to 30 per cent of what the patient has paid.

            Doctors working privately are otherwise rarely on the receiving end. Pharmaceutical companies offer them the world to convince them to prescribe their medicines and starting from the television, the fridge, the washing machine, down to the pen they are using are “gifts” from companies. For doctors with higher “prescription capacity”, foreign trips, attendance to international conferences, memberships to exclusive clubs are provided for by these companies. Interestingly, such medicines are rarely available beyond the drug store within the hospital or clinic. 

             
            Thank you very much.
            With warm personal regards,
             
            Nikhil
            Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
            MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
            FAIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
            Faculty cum Epidemiologist,
            Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
            CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
            Pin-176001.
            01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
            Mobile: 094181-28634.
                             drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
             




            Yahoo! India has a new look. Take a sneak peek.




            --
            Dr. J Kishore
            MBBS, MD, PGCHFWM, PGDEE, MSc., MNAMS, FIPHA
            Professor Community Medicine, Maulana Azad Medical College, New Delhi 110002,
            INDIA,
            (Mobile) 09868010950; 09968604249

            Please visit for more details: http://drjugalkishore.blogspot.com

            Director (Hony): Center for Inquiry (Delhi Branch)

            President (Hony)
            Kishore Foundations; Sabasva Foundation,

            Author of
            * National Health Programs of India,
            * A Dictionary of Public Health
            * Practical & Viva: Community Medicine
            * A Textbook of Health for Health Care Worker,
            * Biomedical Waste Management in India,
            * Vanishing Girl Child (on Female Feticide), Bhrun Hatiya: Apradhi Kaun?
            * The Pioneering Social  Reformers of India
            * The Great Warriors of Human Rights Movement in India
            For books Visit http://centurypublications.co.in
          • Rakesh Biswas
            Attached a recent article by Prof AC Anand as it may be relevant to this discussion ( with its special relevance to community medicine in its concluding
            Message 5 of 7 , Nov 1, 2009
            Attached a recent article by Prof AC Anand as it may be relevant to this discussion ( with its special relevance to community medicine in its concluding pages).
             
            rakesh
            On Mon, Nov 2, 2009 at 10:53 AM, Jugal Kishore <drjugalkishore@...> wrote:
             

            Dear Dr. Surender N Gupta
            Current society is appreciating more to those who earn in million. You can find in magazines and in newspaper every fornightly high about those personalities who are earning in crores. It must be pinching to Dorctors specially superspeciality experts who had put so much investment of life and still noever figure out to be great personality even at the national level.
             
            Another reason could be lack of ethical and moral education to medical doctors from the very beginig. Lack ok role models. 
             
             Anyway this is high time that we should include medical ethics and orientation of medical students to the scientific and humanistic approach to patients and their problems and ablility to identify all risk factors which can give rise to such inhuman medical practices. 
             
            Law also has some role which is again a challenging area.
              
            With kind regards.
             
            Dr. J Kishore
            On Sun, Nov 1, 2009 at 3:33 PM, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@...> wrote:
             

            Review is not bad but the worse part is the money minting in disguise in corporate sector many times. 
             
            Nikhil
            Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
            MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH;PGCHFWM;
            FAIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
            Faculty cum Epidemiologist,
            Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
            CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
            Pin-176001.
            01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
            Mobile: 094181-28634.
                             drnikhilsurender@...
             


            --- On Sun, 11/1/09, Dr. Pradeep Kasar <kasarpk@...> wrote:

            From: Dr. Pradeep Kasar <kasarpk@...>
            Subject: Re: [iapsm_youthmembers] Target-driven docs have little cure
            To: iapsm_youthmembers@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Sunday, November 1, 2009, 3:06 PM


             
            I am referring a brain dead patient to you. I have made enough money from him, now you can keep him for a few days,” 

            This happening every where  in all city where Medical College , even in district Hospital they send brain dead patient, I had been Medical Superintendent In MCH Jabalpur  review brain dead patient admitted in ICU many times.

            Dr. P.K.Kasar

            Professor & Head 

            Department of Community Medicine

            NSCB Medical College Jabalpur

            communitymedicineja balpur@yahoo. in

            9425359504, 07612671727 (Res),  07612673973 (Fax)
            --- On Sun, 1/11/09, surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@ yahoo.com> wrote:

            From: surendernikhil gupta <drsurendernikhil@ yahoo.com>
            Subject: [iapsm_youthmembers ] Target-driven docs have little cure
            To: "allindiamdmsdoctor sassociation" <allindiamdmsdoctors association@ yahoogroups. com>, "Diseasesurveillanc e group" <diseasesurveillance @yahoogroups. com>, "Hospital management" <hosp_admn_india@ yahoogroups. com>, "IAPSM" <iapsm_youthmembers@ yahoogroups. com>, "ifanet india" <ifanet-india@ googlegroups. com>, "reprohealth_ india" <reprohealth_ india-subscribe@ yahoogroups. com>
            Cc: "alt_health_ india" <alt_health_india@ yahoogroups. com>, "issuesonline" <issuesonline_ worldwide@ yahoogroups. com>, "humanrightsactivis t" <humanrightsactivist @yahoogroups. com>, "PU CHDProf Amarnath Gill" <amarnathgill@ gmail.com>

            Date: Sunday, 1 November, 2009, 3:00 PM

             
            The conditions in mercurial materialism have started deteriorating upto this extent that even our colleagues donot spare the junior ones, especially in the so callled big cities. I have an experience of visiting our medical college very senior teacher (Ex) for an expert obstretical opinion for the wife of a close friend.We used to keep him in high esteem for his outspoken opinion. The patient was having her second pregnancy in 2nd trimester  with moderate grade anemia. We did not find anything abnormal. It was a routine check up.
             
            But we were wonder struck when we had his melodramatic mannerisms depicting the grave conditions of the patient, warranting immediate hospitalization in XX hospital and so on and so forth.
             
            I,especially personally felt ashamed to consult the gentleman. I could not help telling my senior teacher bluntly in one sentence. Money is important but no melodrama, Sir. Four chapptis in life and two handful of ashes in death-That is all.
             
            Such dramas can not last longer.Truth has the birthright to emerge out. “I am referring a brain dead patient to you. I have made enough money from him, now you can keep him for a few days,” is his request.
             
            I can quote many examples now unfortuantely.

             

            http://www.tribunei ndia.com/ 2009/20091101/ main7.htm

             

            Patients or victims? — PART II
            Target-driven docs have little cure
            Chitleen K Sethi
            Tribune News Service

            Chandigarh, October 31
            A private doctor in Baddi calls up his medical college classmate serving in a private hospital in Mohali. “I am referring a brain dead patient to you. I have made enough money from him, now you can keep him for a few days,” is his request.

            What has happened to the Hippocratic oath, one wonders.

            Doctors working towards meeting “targets” are almost every corporate hospital’s success mantra. The salary of a doctor, his promotion, his foreign trips, his media exposure can all depend on the number of surgeries he performs, stents he implants, tests he prescribes.. .or in other words how “lucrative” he is to the organisation.

            “It is said about a cardiac hospital here that one should never go to them towards the month-end when doctors are under tremendous pressure to meet targets. There is a possibility of their operating on perfectly healthy persons,” said a Mohali resident.

            Such “target doctors” are paid a certain amount as retainership for a fixed number of procedures. If the doctor is unable to bring in this minimum number of patients, his retainership is liable to be reduced accordingly. In some hospitals, this target is fixed for the whole year but in some cases it has to be met each month. And if a doctor wishes to earn beyond his retainership, he has to somehow get more patients.

            “The result invariably is that gullible patients going for out-patient check-ups for minor problems end up being told how serious their condition was and how important it was to get admitted. Once the patient is admitted, he is the goose that would lay a golden egg everyday for the hospital,” said a doctor working in one such hospital. Other than “target doctors”, hospitals also have medical officers employed on fixed salary. They are generally ill-paid and in several cases not even proficient. Hospitals are known to have on their rolls doctors with questionable degrees and even unrecognised degrees. An allopathic hospital here has Ayurveda doctors working for it as senior residents.

            Yet another category of doctors in private hospitals is the “consultants” category. They are not on the rolls of the hospital but are merely associated with them. The understanding with them varies from hospital to hospital but most of them allege that while the patient is charged a large amount as “consultant fee”, what they get from the hospital is slashed to 30 per cent of what the patient has paid.

            Doctors working privately are otherwise rarely on the receiving end. Pharmaceutical companies offer them the world to convince them to prescribe their medicines and starting from the television, the fridge, the washing machine, down to the pen they are using are “gifts” from companies. For doctors with higher “prescription capacity”, foreign trips, attendance to international conferences, memberships to exclusive clubs are provided for by these companies. Interestingly, such medicines are rarely available beyond the drug store within the hospital or clinic. 

             
            Thank you very much.
            With warm personal regards,
             
            Nikhil
            Dr. Surender N. Gupta,
            MBBS; PGDHHM;PGDMCH; PGCHFWM;
            FAIMS;MA (Phil);MAE (Epidemiology)
            Faculty cum Epidemiologist,
            Regional Health and Family Welfare Training Centre,
            CHHEB, Kangra-Himachal Pradesh, India.
            Pin-176001.
            01892-265472 (Fax); 01892-263472 (Office)
            Mobile: 094181-28634.
                             drnikhilsurender@ gmail.com
             




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            MBBS, MD, PGCHFWM, PGDEE, MSc., MNAMS, FIPHA
            Professor Community Medicine, Maulana Azad Medical College, New Delhi 110002,
            INDIA,
            (Mobile) 09868010950; 09968604249

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          • Dr. Karan Singh Sagar
            Dear All, USAID/MCHIP is looking for suitable candidates for its district level work in UP and Jharkhand. Attached is the ToR and information on application
            Message 6 of 7 , Nov 2, 2009

            Dear All,

            USAID/MCHIP is looking for suitable candidates for its district level work in UP and Jharkhand. Attached is the ToR and information on application process.

             

            .............................................................................

            Thanks and Best Regards

            Dr Karan Singh Sagar

            Country Representative

            USAID/Maternal and Child Health Integrated Program (MCHIP)

            C-15, 2nd Floor, Harrison Chamber,

            Commercial Complex Safdarjung Development Area

            Opposite IIT Main Gate

            New Delhi-110016

            Tel: +91-11-46082393/394

            Fax:    +91-11-46082266

            Mobile: +91-9910277667

            Email karan@...; karansagar@...

            option -1

             

             

          • Dr. Karan Singh Sagar
            Friends, I will request you to apply as per the procedure given in the ToR attached in my last mail (also available on Devnet India) and refrain from sending
            Message 7 of 7 , Nov 3, 2009
            • 0 Attachment

              Friends, I will request you to apply as per the procedure given in the ToR attached in my last mail (also available on Devnet India) and refrain from sending the mails directly to me.

              Thanks for understanding.

               

               

              From: Dr. Karan Singh Sagar [mailto:drkaransagar@...]
              Sent: 02 November 2009 15:45
              To: 'iapsm_youthmembers@yahoogroups.com'
              Cc: 'karanssagar@...'
              Subject: Vacancy with USAID/MCHIP

               

              Dear All,

              USAID/MCHIP is looking for suitable candidates for its district level work in UP and Jharkhand. Attached is the ToR and information on application process.

               

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