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Re:Fw: SMS FOR DOTS MONITORING

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  • omesh bharti
    Dear friends,                   we need not see other countries, in Andhra Pradesh 104 service is operational whereas the SMS from health
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 1, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Dear friends,
                        we need not see other countries, in Andhra Pradesh 104 service is operational whereas the SMS from health workers is directly fed to a computerised software and data from the entire state can be generated same day. I went to see this service and was amazed to see the effectiveness of this system. We need to replicate the same in the country for IDSP ar RNTCP.
      Thanks

      Dr Omesh Bharti.
      Member State AEFI Committee HP, Programme Officer, EMRS & Telemedicine HP Health Services, Shimla.
       +91 9418120302
      bhartiomesh@... bhartiomesh@...


      --- On Mon, 3/2/09, Rajesh Sood <drrksood@...> wrote:
      From: Rajesh Sood <drrksood@...>
      Subject: Re: [diseasesurveillance] Fw: SMS FOR DOTS MONITORING
      To: diseasesurveillance@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Monday, March 2, 2009, 6:57 AM

      DEAR ALL
       
      SMS CANNOT REPLACE HEALTH WORKERS ROLE IN DOTS, HOWEVER MOBILE PHONE TECHNOLOGY IS IMNESELT HELPFUL TECHNOLOGY AND A USEFUL TOOL TO THE VILLAGE HEALTH WORKER TO HELP HIM FOLLOW UP ON CASES AND IMPROVE COMMUNICATION.
      WE HAVE MOOTED A PROPOSAL OF MOBILE ALLOWNACE FOR HEALTH WORKERS UNDER THE THE DISTRICT ACTION PLAN OF NRHM LAST YEAR BUT IS YET TO SEE THE LIGHT OF THE DAY HERE.

      DR RK SOOD
      On Sun, Mar 1, 2009 at 7:56 PM, prabir chatterjee <prabirkc@yahoo. com> wrote:

      26 FEBRUARY 2009
       
       
      More on Technology
       
      Text messages could hasten tuberculosis drug compliance (The Lancet, 3 Jan. 2009)
       
      To help people complete their TB treatment WHO recommends a strategy known as DOTS (directly observed treatment, short course). ...
       
      Although DOTS has helped to dramatically improve tuberculosis control around the world, it is insufficient or inaccessible for thousands of patient. ..... Other experts note that DOTS is expensive and human-resource intensive. They say it is unrealistic to expect health workers to monitor patients on a daily basis.
       
      Several disease control and technology specialists are now looking to SMS as a cost-effective way to communicate with and monitor hard-to-reach patients in remote locations.
       
      One reminder product is a small pill bottle made by London-based SIMpill that contains a SIM card and when opened, the SIM card delivers a SMS with a unique pill box identification number to a central server. The central server receives the incoming SMS and stores the data, but if no SMS is received at the designated time, the server contacts the patient via phone alerting them to take their medication. If the patient does not respond, the server contacts a caregiver who can follow-up with the patient. ...
       
       
             TechNet21 e-Forum

      .




      --
      Dr RK Sood

      drrksood@gmail. com
      +91 9418064077, +91 9445157327

    • Vivek Gupta
      Dear All I hav e just come back from a trip[ to Prakasham district in Andhra where they are using SMS based reporting for IDSP. the project is implemented by
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 1, 2009
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        Dear All
        I hav e just come back from a trip[ to Prakasham district in Andhra where they are using SMS based reporting for IDSP. the project is implemented by NIC. They are using the system fro forms S, P, L1, L2 and W
        They use codings in SMS for each disease for which data has to be sent in SMS. The  number of diseases for which code has to be entered at the subcentre level (form S) is small but the number increases dramatically at the Form P level. The ANMs / MPWM / Phrmacists / Health Inspectors are using their personal mobiles (as of now) for sending SMS. The SMS data is stored in the NIC server locatedin Hyderabad. The server send them a confirmatory SMS about the diseases for which the data has been submitted by the workers. The district data managers need to log on to the NIC server to generate reports.

        On the NRHM front, the GOI has rationalized, shiortened and standardized the NRHM reporting formats. The flow of the information has been defined. The SC/ST/Others / Total breakups have been done away with (Horizonal reduction I would it is as). The number of fields has also been reduced considerably (Vertical Reduction). The forms are available at the HMIS postal of the MOHFW.The data is being enetred at the MIHFW - HMIS portal. Plus there is a software DHIS2 that is being implemented at distrct levels in almost all of states of India. Trainngs are going on in states does DHIS2 to district and state level people.

        With my involvement in the current HMIS implementation, I can tell you that there are efforts from the central ministry level for using SMS for Sub-centre level NRHM reporting. A pilot project has been finalized and hopefully would soon be implemented for the same in 5 blocks of India.
         
        Subsequently the plan is to pilot the same for PHCs as well. Further the mobile phone could be used for other purposes as well.

        Dr. Vivek Gupta, MBBS, MD (Community Medicine)
        Reserarcher
        HISP-India (www.lewispages.net)
        New Delhi.
        Phone: (+91)9899410420
        Alt. E-mail:  drvivek(dot)gupta(at)gmail(dot)com



        --- On Sun, 3/1/09, omesh bharti <bhartiomesh@...> wrote:
        From: omesh bharti <bhartiomesh@...>
        Subject: [iapsm_youthmembers] Re:Fw: SMS FOR DOTS MONITORING
        To: diseasesurveillance@yahoogroups.com
        Cc: "IAPSM" <iapsm_youthmembers@yahoogroups.com>, "ifanet india" <ifanet-india@...>, "Hospital management" <hosp_admn_india@yahoogroups.com>
        Date: Sunday, March 1, 2009, 8:52 PM

        Dear friends,
                          we need not see other countries, in Andhra Pradesh 104 service is operational whereas the SMS from health workers is directly fed to a computerised software and data from the entire state can be generated same day. I went to see this service and was amazed to see the effectiveness of this system. We need to replicate the same in the country for IDSP ar RNTCP.
        Thanks

        Dr Omesh Bharti.
        Member State AEFI Committee HP, Programme Officer, EMRS & Telemedicine HP Health Services, Shimla.
         +91 9418120302
        bhartiomesh@... bhartiomesh@...


        --- On Mon, 3/2/09, Rajesh Sood <drrksood@...> wrote:
        From: Rajesh Sood <drrksood@...>
        Subject: Re: [diseasesurveillance] Fw: SMS FOR DOTS MONITORING
        To: diseasesurveillance@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Monday, March 2, 2009, 6:57 AM

        DEAR ALL
         
        SMS CANNOT REPLACE HEALTH WORKERS ROLE IN DOTS, HOWEVER MOBILE PHONE TECHNOLOGY IS IMNESELT HELPFUL TECHNOLOGY AND A USEFUL TOOL TO THE VILLAGE HEALTH WORKER TO HELP HIM FOLLOW UP ON CASES AND IMPROVE COMMUNICATION.
        WE HAVE MOOTED A PROPOSAL OF MOBILE ALLOWNACE FOR HEALTH WORKERS UNDER THE THE DISTRICT ACTION PLAN OF NRHM LAST YEAR BUT IS YET TO SEE THE LIGHT OF THE DAY HERE.

        DR RK SOOD
        On Sun, Mar 1, 2009 at 7:56 PM, prabir chatterjee <prabirkc@yahoo. com> wrote:

        26 FEBRUARY 2009
         
         
        More on Technology
         
        Text messages could hasten tuberculosis drug compliance (The Lancet, 3 Jan. 2009)
         
        To help people complete their TB treatment WHO recommends a strategy known as DOTS (directly observed treatment, short course). ...
         
        Although DOTS has helped to dramatically improve tuberculosis control around the world, it is insufficient or inaccessible for thousands of patient. ..... Other experts note that DOTS is expensive and human-resource intensive. They say it is unrealistic to expect health workers to monitor patients on a daily basis.
         
        Several disease control and technology specialists are now looking to SMS as a cost-effective way to communicate with and monitor hard-to-reach patients in remote locations.
         
        One reminder product is a small pill bottle made by London-based SIMpill that contains a SIM card and when opened, the SIM card delivers a SMS with a unique pill box identification number to a central server. The central server receives the incoming SMS and stores the data, but if no SMS is received at the designated time, the server contacts the patient via phone alerting them to take their medication. If the patient does not respond, the server contacts a caregiver who can follow-up with the patient. ...
         
         
               TechNet21 e-Forum

        .




        --
        Dr RK Sood

        drrksood@gmail. com
        +91 9418064077, +91 9445157327




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