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World Health Report 2008

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  • omesh bharti
    pl.see. Dr Omesh Bharti. ... From: Mahesh Devnani Subject: [hosp_admn_india] World Health Report 2008 To:
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 24, 2008
      pl.see.

      Dr Omesh Bharti.

      --- On Sun, 11/23/08, Mahesh Devnani <mahesh_devnani@...> wrote:
      From: Mahesh Devnani <mahesh_devnani@...>
      Subject: [hosp_admn_india] World Health Report 2008
      To: hosp_admn_india@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Sunday, November 23, 2008, 8:07 PM

      Five common shortcomings of health-care delivery

       

      Inverse care. People with the most me whose needs for

      health care are often less consume the most care, whereas

      those with the least means and greatest health problems consume

      the least. Public spending on health services most

      often benefits the rich more than the poor in high- and low income

      countries alike.

       

      Impoverishing care. Wherever people lack social protection

      and payment for care is largely out-of-pocket at the point of

      service, they can be confronted with catastrophic expenses.

      Over 100 million people annually fall into poverty because they

      have to pay for health care.

       

      Fragmented and fragmenting care. The excessive specialization

      of health-care providers and the narrow focus of many

      disease control programmes discourage a holistic approach

      to the individuals and the families they deal with and do not

      appreciate the need for continuity in care. Health services

      for poor and marginalized groups are often highly fragmented

      and severely under-resourced, while development aid often

      adds to the fragmentation.

       

      Unsafe care. Poor system design that is unable to ensure safety

      and hygiene standards leads to high rates of hospital-acquired

      infections, along with medication errors and other avoidable

      adverse effects that are an underestimated cause of death

      and ill-health.

       

      Misdirected care. Resource allocation clusters around curative

      services at great cost, neglecting the potential of primary

      prevention and health promotion to prevent up to 70% of the

      disease burden. At the same time, the health sector lacks

      the expertise to mitigate the adverse effects on health from

      other sectors and make the most of what these other sectors

      can contribute to health.

       

      For full Report See the Attachment

       

       


      From Chandigarh to Chennai - find friends all over India. Click here.

    • Kartik Trivedi
      Dear Dr Omesh, Thanx. Few days back I have recd d hard copy for my Departmental Library. Pl keep it up. K ... -- Dr. Kartik N. Trivedi, Professor & Head,
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 24, 2008
        Dear Dr Omesh,
        Thanx.
        Few days back I have recd d hard copy for my Departmental Library.
        Pl keep it up.
        K

         
        On 11/24/08, omesh bharti <bhartiomesh@...> wrote:

        pl.see.

        Dr Omesh Bharti.

        --- On Sun, 11/23/08, Mahesh Devnani <mahesh_devnani@...> wrote:
        From: Mahesh Devnani <mahesh_devnani@...>
        Subject: [hosp_admn_india] World Health Report 2008
        To: hosp_admn_india@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Sunday, November 23, 2008, 8:07 PM

        Five common shortcomings of health-care delivery

         

        Inverse care. People with the most me whose needs for

        health care are often less consume the most care, whereas

        those with the least means and greatest health problems consume

        the least. Public spending on health services most

        often benefits the rich more than the poor in high- and low income

        countries alike.

         

        Impoverishing care. Wherever people lack social protection

        and payment for care is largely out-of-pocket at the point of

        service, they can be confronted with catastrophic expenses.

        Over 100 million people annually fall into poverty because they

        have to pay for health care.

         

        Fragmented and fragmenting care. The excessive specialization

        of health-care providers and the narrow focus of many

        disease control programmes discourage a holistic approach

        to the individuals and the families they deal with and do not

        appreciate the need for continuity in care. Health services

        for poor and marginalized groups are often highly fragmented

        and severely under-resourced, while development aid often

        adds to the fragmentation.

         

        Unsafe care. Poor system design that is unable to ensure safety

        and hygiene standards leads to high rates of hospital-acquired

        infections, along with medication errors and other avoidable

        adverse effects that are an underestimated cause of death

        and ill-health.

         

        Misdirected care. Resource allocation clusters around curative

        services at great cost, neglecting the potential of primary

        prevention and health promotion to prevent up to 70% of the

        disease burden. At the same time, the health sector lacks

        the expertise to mitigate the adverse effects on health from

        other sectors and make the most of what these other sectors

        can contribute to health.

         

        For full Report See the Attachment

         

         



        From Chandigarh to Chennai - find friends all over India. Click here.





        --
        Dr. Kartik N. Trivedi,
        Professor & Head,
        Community Medicine (P&SM) Department,
        Smt. N.H.L. Municipal Medical College,
        Ellisbridge, Ahmedabad 380 006,
        Gujarat, India
        Telefax:      (O) +91-79-2657-5778(Direct)
        Telephone: (O)  +91-79-2657-6275(Extn:208)  +91-79-2657-7621(Extn:305)
        Fax: +91-79-2657-9282(Kind Attn.psmknt) E-mail:drkntrivedi@.../drkntrivedi@...
        Website:nhlmmcgym.com
      • Rajesh Sood
        Dear all, The exisitng timings of public medical care services are less friendly to poor clients who cannot afford to lose a day s wages to go to public
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 25, 2008
          Dear all,
           
          The exisitng timings of public medical care services are less friendly to poor clients who cannot afford to lose a day's wages to go to public hospitals, instead they prefer to pay at a private evening clinic which makes better economics. Moreover, in the current model, user charges are being levied on medcal services (the  governments are pulling away from social welfare responsibilities ) and adding to the burden of out of pocket payments and the poverty trap.
           
          <In 1980 the World Bank also started financing health programmes. By 1983 it had displaced the World Health Organization (WHO) as the major external funder of health programmes. The funding agencies which support health programmes, become the decision makers who decide how the national health programme will be managed. In 1987 the World Bank came out with an official document on the financing of health care in developing countries. A major recommendation was that user fees be charged for medical treatment. Yet, even at that time it was realised that a certain category of poor would have to be exempt from these charges. The term used to describe exempting the poor from user fees was safety nets. In fact, it was argued that the government savings resulting from user fees in medical care should be invested in these safety nets. Other recommendations were the organization of health insurance, the use of private providers (including non-governmental organizations) to supply fee for service treatment, and the introduction of decentralization. Despite the detailed plans of the World Bank, however the numbers of patients making use of government facilities fell in many countries following the introduction of user fees.>
           
           
          The other basic flaw this that medical care is confused as health. Even the National Rural Health Mission that boasts of a new approach- gives mere lip service to sanitation, nutrition and cost containment. None of the District Action Plans reflect any understanding or commitment for these basic elements of health. Intersectoral approach is critical and systems need to be developed
           

          A recent study on intersectoral action in health in HP by Centre for Health Promotion RTDC with Oxfam recommended that there should be formulation of an operational plan for six components of determinants of health i.e. potable water, nutrition, sanitation, lifestyle, tobacco and physical activity, based on active involvement of each department. A joint micro plan should be prepared on these determinants with the active involvement of Panchayat, Panchayat Smiti, Zila Parishad and experts from concerned department.

          Allocation of resources of different sectors should take part based on the micro-plan prepared by all sectors and its implementation should takes place with active participation of community/ user groups. The plan should also be an integral part of plan for social and economic development plan formulated at Panchayat level.


          Dr RK Sood

          drrksood@...
          +91 9418064077, +91 9445157327


           
          On Tue, Nov 25, 2008 at 8:51 AM, omesh bharti <bhartiomesh@...> wrote:
           
          Pl . see.

          Dr Omesh Bharti.

          --- On Sun, 11/23/08, Mahesh Devnani <mahesh_devnani@...> wrote:
          From: Mahesh Devnani <mahesh_devnani@...>
          Subject: [hosp_admn_india] World Health Report 2008
          To:
          hosp_admn_india@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Sunday, November 23, 2008, 8:07 PM

          Five common shortcomings of health-care delivery

           

          Inverse care. People with the most me whose needs for health care are often less consume the most care, whereas those with the least means and greatest health problems consume the least. Public spending on health services most often benefits the rich more than the poor in high- and low income countries alike.

           

          Impoverishing care. Wherever people lack social protection and payment for care is largely out-of-pocket at the point of service, they can be confronted with catastrophic expenses. Over 100 million people annually fall into poverty because they have to pay for health care.

           

          Fragmented and fragmenting care. The excessive specialization of health-care providers and the narrow focus of many disease control programmes discourage a holistic approach to the individuals and the families they deal with and do not appreciate the need for continuity in care. Health services for poor and marginalized groups are often highly fragmented and severely under-resourced, while development aid often adds to the fragmentation.

           

          Unsafe care. Poor system design that is unable to ensure safety and hygiene standards leads to high rates of hospital-acquired infections, along with medication errors and other avoidable adverse effects that are an underestimated cause of death and ill-health.

           

          Misdirected care. Resource allocation clusters around curative services at great cost, neglecting the potential of primary prevention and health promotion to prevent up to 70% of the disease burden. At the same time, the health sector lacks the expertise to mitigate the adverse effects on health from other sectors and make the most of what these other sectors can contribute to health.

           

          For full Report See the Attachment

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