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Older technology river depth and water velocity measurement

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  • wandreef
    Hi, In about a months time I m embarking on a two week canoe journey in northern Canada on a large river as part of a historical re-enactment. I m recording
    Message 1 of 4 , May 1, 2012
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      Hi,

      In about a months time I'm embarking on a two week canoe journey in northern Canada on a large river as part of a historical re-enactment. I'm recording the experience in a daily log and hoping to undertake some scientific data gathering along the way using older technology and analysis methods. I'm interested in people's idea's on what I can use to measure river depth and velocity at various camp locations along the way. I have a crude sextant to determine relative position. I have some thoughts as to how to go about this but I'm hoping for better idea's. Anyone have any idea's or experience with using older equipment and methods in this type of situation?
    • Wilsnack, Mark
      You may want to consider using the WinRiver software. A report by Simpson (2001), available on the USGS website, explains the principles behind taking such
      Message 2 of 4 , May 3, 2012
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        You may want to consider using the WinRiver software. A report by Simpson (2001), available on the USGS website, explains the principles behind taking such measurements.


        From: hydforum@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hydforum@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of wandreef
        Sent: Tuesday, May 01, 2012 11:36 PM
        To: hydforum@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [hydforum] Older technology river depth and water velocity measurement

        Hi,

        In about a months time I'm embarking on a two week canoe journey in northern Canada on a large river as part of a historical re-enactment. I'm recording the experience in a daily log and hoping to undertake some scientific data gathering along the way using older technology and analysis methods. I'm interested in people's idea's on what I can use to measure river depth and velocity at various camp locations along the way. I have a crude sextant to determine relative position. I have some thoughts as to how to go about this but I'm hoping for better idea's. Anyone have any idea's or experience with using older equipment and methods in this type of situation?

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      • Murchie, Rod
        Lightweight ship s lead (line knotted at foot intervals, lead weight with recess for wax to collect substrate), chronometer for longitude, oranges (which float
        Message 3 of 4 , May 3, 2012
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          Lightweight ship's lead (line knotted at foot intervals, lead weight with recess for wax to collect substrate), chronometer for longitude, oranges (which float semi-submerged) to drop in the river to find water velocity along a measured course.

          R Murchie
          Environment Planning, Solent & South Downs Area
          Int 723 4839
          Ext 01962 764839
          Mob 07770 350572
        • Chris Hauser
          I assume that whatever you d be using to measure depth and velocity would need to be carried in your canoe? I also assume that you would not be using any
          Message 4 of 4 , May 3, 2012
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            I assume that whatever you'd be using to measure depth and velocity
            would need to be carried in your canoe? I also assume that you would
            not be using any expensive/advanced equipment?

            In that case, you might try a rope, marked off in
            feet/inches/centimeters, with a heavy weight attached as your depth
            gauge. Realize that the measurments will likely be only approximate, as
            the river current will likely drag the rope a bit, causing some errors
            in the readings. Also, if the river has a soft bottom, it might make it
            tougher to "feel" when it hits bottom. Also be careful of getting the
            rope snagged on underwater obstructions. Also, the depth you measure
            will vary, because the cross-section of the river will vary at a
            particular location.

            As for velocity, exactly what are you trying to measure? The point
            velocity in the flow stream, especially for a large river, will vary
            depending upon both the depth you take the measurement, and the distance
            from the river bank. Therefore, if you want the "average" velocity of
            the river, you'd need to take many measurements at a particular point of
            your travels. On top of that, you would need some type of velocity
            meter that would likely need electric power. I'm not sure how you'd
            accomplish that task.

            Good luck on your trip.

            Regards,
            Chris Hauser
            Toledo, OH


            >>> "wandreef" <wandreef@...> 5/1/2012 11:36 PM >>>

            Hi,

            In about a months time I'm embarking on a two week canoe journey in
            northern Canada on a large river as part of a historical re-enactment.
            I'm recording the experience in a daily log and hoping to undertake some
            scientific data gathering along the way using older technology and
            analysis methods. I'm interested in people's idea's on what I can use to
            measure river depth and velocity at various camp locations along the
            way. I have a crude sextant to determine relative position. I have some
            thoughts as to how to go about this but I'm hoping for better idea's.
            Anyone have any idea's or experience with using older equipment and
            methods in this type of situation?
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