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Re: Cell Phones

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  • hortonhearsahum
    Assuming for the moment that the cell theory has validity, could the absence of complaints in urban areas be due to the way cells are set up there vs rurally?
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 16, 2004
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      Assuming for the moment that the cell theory has validity, could the
      absence of complaints in urban areas be due to the way cells are set
      up there vs rurally? I'm not an expert on the subject but from what
      I've read, in high-traffic areas, there is a correspondingly higher
      density of antennas required. These are usually mounted on buildings
      as opposed to towers so are not as noticeable but if you look for
      them you'll see them.

      As I understand it, each antenna provides for communications to each
      cell phone in it's "cell" but also "backhaul" transmission of the
      signals to neighbouring towers. It is the backhaul transmission that
      I would suspect as the culprit due to higher energy required since
      greater distances are being traversed. In urban areas the antennas
      are much closer together so the backhaul transmissions required would
      be of much lower energy thus not creating signals powerful enough to
      incur the microwave hearing effect.

      As for complaints in the 1970's pre-dating cellular usage, I'm not so
      sure about that. Yes, widespread usage didn't arrive until...what,
      the 1990's? ...but there would have been experimentation and other
      microwave usage experimentation. Were the reports from back then as
      extensive as they are now? If the hum is due to microwave hearing,
      then there may be a single cause, in the sense that it's pulsed
      microwaves but multiple causes in the sense that there are many
      different sources of pulsed microwaves.

      Horton

      --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, "Jerry Deming" <jademing@e...> wrote:
      > >
      > > If cell transmissions are the source, why would the "hum" occur in
      > > fall and winter, but not during summer?
      > > Patty, Colfax/Grass Valley, CA
      > >
      >
      > A very good question.
      >
      > I am working from the viewpoint that until
      > proven otherwise, there is ONE hum with
      > ONE source.
      >
      > Given that philosophical approach, there
      > are two difficulties with the cell phone
      > hypothesis.
      >
      > (1) Reliable and widespread reports of the Hum
      > occur in the United Kingdom at least as
      > early as the early 1970s....well before
      > the advent of cell phones.
      >
      > (2) If the hum were due to cell phones,
      > we would expect the most reports from
      > densely populated urban areas. But that
      > is not the case in the US. The two most-publicized
      > cases in the past 10 years have been the small
      > towns of Taos, New Mexico, and Kokomo, Indiana.
      >
      > Consider this. In 1996, the hum was reported
      > from the tiny villages of Hull and Nahant, Massachusetts,
      > about 10 miles east of Boston. There were no
      > reports from the Boston metropolitan area, only
      > reports from these tiny, outlying villages. That
      > suggests that whatever is causing the hum is not
      > an inherent part of an industrialized, technological
      > society.
      >
      > In fact, the case of Hull and Nahant strongly suggests
      > another hypothesis. More later.
      >
      > --David Deming
      > Norman, Oklahoma
    • P. Crawford
      For the record, I found out that there are four providers on the microwave towers about one mile from where I live in rural Calif. They are: Nextel, Verizon,
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 19, 2004
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        For the record, I found out that there are four
        providers on the microwave towers about one mile from
        where I live in rural Calif. They are: Nextel,
        Verizon, AT&T, and Singular. "Backhaul" makes sense as
        far as requiring more energy compared to city cells,
        but I think the hum energy is bigger than what cell
        towers or microwaves deliver.
        The cell towers in my rural area are repeaters. Think
        repeaters grab a signal, then pass it along.
        VLF (3Hz-30Hz) with wavelengths 100,000km-10,000km
        make some kind of sense to me because they barely
        border on the frequency of human hearing
        20Hz-20,000Hz, and are long compared to higher
        frequency wavelengths.
        That's my theory and I'm stickin to it.
        --- hortonhearsahum <hortonhearsahum@...> wrote:
        > Assuming for the moment that the cell theory has
        > validity, could the
        > absence of complaints in urban areas be due to the
        > way cells are set
        > up there vs rurally? I'm not an expert on the
        > subject but from what
        > I've read, in high-traffic areas, there is a
        > correspondingly higher
        > density of antennas required. These are usually
        > mounted on buildings
        > as opposed to towers so are not as noticeable but if
        > you look for
        > them you'll see them.
        >
        > As I understand it, each antenna provides for
        > communications to each
        > cell phone in it's "cell" but also "backhaul"
        > transmission of the
        > signals to neighbouring towers. It is the backhaul
        > transmission that
        > I would suspect as the culprit due to higher energy
        > required since
        > greater distances are being traversed. In urban
        > areas the antennas
        > are much closer together so the backhaul
        > transmissions required would
        > be of much lower energy thus not creating signals
        > powerful enough to
        > incur the microwave hearing effect.
        >
        > As for complaints in the 1970's pre-dating cellular
        > usage, I'm not so
        > sure about that. Yes, widespread usage didn't arrive
        > until...what,
        > the 1990's? ...but there would have been
        > experimentation and other
        > microwave usage experimentation. Were the reports
        > from back then as
        > extensive as they are now? If the hum is due to
        > microwave hearing,
        > then there may be a single cause, in the sense that
        > it's pulsed
        > microwaves but multiple causes in the sense that
        > there are many
        > different sources of pulsed microwaves.
        >
        > Horton
        >
        > --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, "Jerry Deming"
        > <jademing@e...> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > If cell transmissions are the source, why would
        > the "hum" occur in
        > > > fall and winter, but not during summer?
        > > > Patty, Colfax/Grass Valley, CA
        > > >
        > >
        > > A very good question.
        > >
        > > I am working from the viewpoint that until
        > > proven otherwise, there is ONE hum with
        > > ONE source.
        > >
        > > Given that philosophical approach, there
        > > are two difficulties with the cell phone
        > > hypothesis.
        > >
        > > (1) Reliable and widespread reports of the Hum
        > > occur in the United Kingdom at least as
        > > early as the early 1970s....well before
        > > the advent of cell phones.
        > >
        > > (2) If the hum were due to cell phones,
        > > we would expect the most reports from
        > > densely populated urban areas. But that
        > > is not the case in the US. The two
        > most-publicized
        > > cases in the past 10 years have been the small
        > > towns of Taos, New Mexico, and Kokomo, Indiana.
        > >
        > > Consider this. In 1996, the hum was reported
        > > from the tiny villages of Hull and Nahant,
        > Massachusetts,
        > > about 10 miles east of Boston. There were no
        > > reports from the Boston metropolitan area, only
        > > reports from these tiny, outlying villages. That
        > > suggests that whatever is causing the hum is not
        > > an inherent part of an industrialized,
        > technological
        > > society.
        > >
        > > In fact, the case of Hull and Nahant strongly
        > suggests
        > > another hypothesis. More later.
        > >
        > > --David Deming
        > > Norman, Oklahoma
        >
        >


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