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Re: HUM_FORUM: Full Moon & the Hum

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  • skeptichearer
    I don t agree. It s not so simple. At full moon epoch there is an alignment of the three most important celestial bodies for us. Phenomena are measured at full
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 1, 2007
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      I don't agree. It's not so simple. At full moon epoch there is an
      alignment of the three most important celestial bodies for us.
      Phenomena are measured at full moon that have nothing to do with
      moonlight. Just to mention one, the sea (and earth) tides are higher.
      Regards,
      Antonio Iovane

      --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, Tobypaws2002@... wrote:
      >
      >
      > In a message dated 28/08/2007 12:33:10 GMT Standard Time,
      > maddie@... writes:
      >
      > Probably a silly question but I am going to ask anyway.
      > I have not heard the hum for ages but yesterday @ 2.00 am there
      it was
      > loud & clear making my eardrums vibrate. Seems to coincide with a
      Full
      > Moon rising tonight.
      > I am in the SW of England and have been hearing it for over 6
      years.
      >
      > Anyone else come across this or is just me =)
      >
      >
      >
      > Hi,
      > May I just add that a full moon, in my humble opinion,
      > probably doesn't have any significance in the loudness of 'The
      Hum'.
      > When the moon is 'full', it is only reflecting more of the sun's
      light back
      > onto the earth, and the moonlight is comparitively weak,
      anyway.....
      > I would be more inclined to wonder whether more people were 'out
      and about'
      > during Full Moon,
      > making more noise!
      > Or maybe, farming activities going on in the night?
      > Our farmer in England often gather crops. etc., by night, to take
      advantage
      > of
      > dry weather.
      > The tractors trundle up and down, and that constant
      > drone is just the sort of noise that can travel on the wind,
      > perhaps many miles.
      > Just trying to help....
      > R.M.
      > LFNS Helpline,
      > England.
      >
    • Tobypaws2002@aol.com
      In a message dated 01/09/2007 13:20:44 GMT Standard Time, skeptichearer@yahoo.com writes: Phenomena are measured at full moon that have nothing to do with
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 1, 2007
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        In a message dated 01/09/2007 13:20:44 GMT Standard Time, skeptichearer@... writes:
        Phenomena are measured at full moon that have nothing to do with
        moonlight. Just to mention one, the sea (and earth) tides are higher.
        Regards,
        Antonio Iovane
        The full moon has no greater influence on tides than say a new moon,
        as the mass of the moon does not change.
        Maybe the moon's influence changes if it is at different distances from the earth?
        What I meant was that I don't think fluctuations in the Hum are
        connected to the amount of light given off at full moon,
        as the message seemed to me to  imply.
        If that were so, then daylight (direct sun) would be deafening.
        Please enlighten if possible about varying distances of the moon
        from the earth and whether this is what causes higher tides?
        Even if the writer meant differing gravitational pulls, I still doubt if this has
        any bearing on The Hum, just my humble opinion.
        Best Wishes,
        R.M.
        LFNS Helpline.
         
      • David Deming
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 1, 2007
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          Re: HUM_FORUM:   Full Moon & the Hum

          >
          > In a message dated 01/09/2007 13:20:44 GMT Standard Time,
          > skeptichearer@... writes:
          >> Phenomena are measured at full moon that have nothing to do with  
          >> moonlight. Just to mention one, the sea (and earth) tides are  higher.
          >> Regards,
          >> Antonio Iovane
          > The full moon has no greater influence on tides than say a new moon,
          > as the mass of the moon does not change.
          > Maybe the moon's influence changes if it is at different distances from the
          > earth?
          >

          At full and new moon phases, tidal forces are at a maximum because
          the gravitational pull of the Moon is aligned with that of the Sun.
          At these times of syzygy, the Earth, Moon, and Sun are in a line.

          So the distance of the Moon from the Earth does not change
          significantly, but the net gravitational or tidal force felt on
          Earth changes because gravity is a vector quantity which has
          both magnitude and direction.

          >
          > What I meant was that I don't think fluctuations in the Hum are
          > connected to the amount of light given off at full moon,
          > as the message seemed to me to  imply.
          >

          I don't think that Moonlight affects the Hum either.

          --DD
        • skeptichearer
          Dear Prof. Deming and Toby, Thanks for your comments. I believe that someting unknown happens at the occurrence of alignements of masses. I ve measured for
          Message 4 of 5 , Sep 3, 2007
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            Dear Prof. Deming and Toby,

            Thanks for your comments.
            I believe that someting unknown happens at the occurrence of
            alignements of masses. I've measured for years some physical
            quantities which vary with a synodic (lunar month) pattern having
            peaks at new and full moon. This includes variations in temperature
            and in the orientation of test masses having a freedom to rotare
            about one axis. The measurements were made in an underground
            obscured unattended quiet lab. I've matured my own correction to the
            theory of gravity (not yet the equation), and discussing this stuff
            is off topic here.
            Simply, I believe that, in the case of sun-moon-earth, when the
            bodies are aligned, the relevant gravity vectors stop to add
            linearily, some gravitational "noise" arises, and further some
            unexplored tiny effects occur in the fine structure of matter.
            So, for me there is a possibility that full and new moon may exert
            subtle effects on the matter, amplifying or attenuating (subtly)
            some phenomana.
            This is why I keep an open eye at a possible correlation between the
            fases of the moon and the "hum".
            Regards,
            Antonio Iovane

            --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, David Deming <profdeming@...> wrote:
            >
            > >
            > >> >
            > >> > In a message dated 01/09/2007 13:20:44 GMT Standard Time,
            > >> > skeptichearer@... writes:
            > >>> >> Phenomena are measured at full moon that have nothing to do
            with
            > >>> >> moonlight. Just to mention one, the sea (and earth) tides
            are higher.
            > >>> >> Regards,
            > >>> >> Antonio Iovane
            > >> > The full moon has no greater influence on tides than say a
            new moon,
            > >> > as the mass of the moon does not change.
            > >> > Maybe the moon's influence changes if it is at different
            distances from the
            > >> > earth?
            > >> >
            > >
            > > At full and new moon phases, tidal forces are at a maximum
            because
            > > the gravitational pull of the Moon is aligned with that of the
            Sun.
            > > At these times of syzygy, the Earth, Moon, and Sun are in a line.
            > >
            > > So the distance of the Moon from the Earth does not change
            > > significantly, but the net gravitational or tidal force felt on
            > > Earth changes because gravity is a vector quantity which has
            > > both magnitude and direction.
            > >
            > >> >
            > >> > What I meant was that I don't think fluctuations in the Hum
            are
            > >> > connected to the amount of light given off at full moon,
            > >> > as the message seemed to me to imply.
            > >> >
            > >
            > > I don't think that Moonlight affects the Hum either.
            > >
            > > --DD
            >
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