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Re: HUM_FORUM: soundproofing

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  • Phil Strong
    It s an anechoic chamber it has large cones on the walls which are carefully designed to absorb sound. In some cercumstances there is a real acoustic source
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 30, 2007
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      It's an anechoic chamber it has large cones on the walls which are carefully designed to absorb sound.
       
      In some cercumstances there is a real acoustic source nearby, if others you know can hear it at your house then
      perhaps this is the case for you, if so it should also be possible to record / locate it.
       
      Phil
       
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Tuesday, January 30, 2007 9:04 AM
      Subject: Re: HUM_FORUM: soundproofing

      How did you soundproof it?

      Phil Strong wrote:

      > HI,
      >
      > Yes we have used a sound proofed room. The hum gets louder.
      > This was another evidence of the source being internal within the
      > inner ear.
      >
      > Phil
      >
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > *From:* belilka <mailto:lgeorge@ocotillo. com>
      > *To:* humforum@yahoogroup s.com <mailto:humforum@yahoogroup s.com>
      > *Sent:* Monday, January 29, 2007 6:05 PM
      > *Subject:* HUM_FORUM: soundproofing
      >
      > Hi,We have just returned from another fruitless day of hum hunting. We
      > live in Santa Cruz mountains in California. We've been searching since
      > August. Friends think we are crazy because we go out at four in the
      > morning with two mikes and a video recorder hoping to at least figure
      > out a direction. Today we drove over the ridge to the ocean. We could
      > hear the hum everywhere today.
      > We have used the noise canceling ear buds, earplugs,white noise. It
      > still is a great burden.
      >
      > So I'm wondering if anyone here has tried soundproofing a room?
      >
      >
      >
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    • Tobypaws2002@aol.com
      In a message dated 29/01/2007 20:42:09 GMT Standard Time, lgeorge@ocotillo.com writes: How did you soundproof it? ... Hi, Phil, Sorry, but that is not proof
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 24 12:48 PM
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        In a message dated 29/01/2007 20:42:09 GMT Standard Time, lgeorge@... writes:

        How did you soundproof it?

        Phil Strong wrote:

        > HI,
        >
        > Yes we have used a sound proofed room. The hum gets louder.
        > This was another evidence of the source being internal within the
        > inner ear.
        >
        > Phil
        >
        >

        Hi, Phil,
        Sorry, but that is not proof that the Hum you hear is internal to yourself.
        It could also be the Hum coming through the soundproofing, because of its long wavelength.
        Apparently you need solid rock or metal, several metres thick, all round, including ceilings and floor, with no air gaps, to have any chance of blocking low frequency noise.
        R.M.
        LFNS helpline, England.
      • Carole Carriker
        Go ahead and call me crazy if you want. I recently bought an energy pillow from Aulterra. (www.aulterra.com if anybody wants
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 24 3:18 PM
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          Go ahead and call me crazy if you want…    I recently bought an “energy pillow” from Aulterra.  (www.aulterra.com if anybody wants to try one; they’re rather pricey though.  I’m not trying to sell them; I have no interest in the company.)  It was recommended to me by a relative as something that would help me sleep.  Anyway, it came yesterday, and in playing around with it I noticed that it does muffle the hum somewhat.  It’s filled with some sort of pulverized minerals; I wonder if more of the same stuff would block the hum.  Just thought I’d throw that in…

           

          Carole

           

          -----Original Message-----
          From: humforum@yahoogroups.com [mailto:humforum@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tobypaws2002@...
          Sent: Saturday, February 24, 2007 12:49 PM
          To: humforum@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: HUM_FORUM: soundproofing

           

          In a message dated 29/01/2007 20:42:09 GMT Standard Time, lgeorge@ocotillo. com writes:

          How did you soundproof it?

          Phil Strong wrote:

          > HI,
          >
          > Yes we have used a sound proofed room. The hum gets louder.
          > This was another evidence of the source being internal within the
          > inner ear.
          >
          > Phil
          >
          >

          Hi, Phil,

          Sorry, but that is not proof that the Hum you hear is internal to yourself.

          It could also be the Hum coming through the soundproofing, because of its long wavelength.

          Apparently you need solid rock or metal, several metres thick, all round, including ceilings and floor, with no air gaps, to have any chance of blocking low frequency noise.

          R.M.

          LFNS helpline, England.

        • Fred Kokaska
          I have had the best results with using an air filter near my bed to mask the hum. I experimented with various white noise generators (soothing sound
          Message 4 of 9 , Feb 24 8:19 PM
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            I have had the best results with using an air filter near my bed to
            mask the hum. I experimented with various "white noise" generators
            (soothing sound generators, etc.) but found that most of the seemed to
            resonate or "beat" with the hum.

            But the mechanical fan/filter seems to massk it the best for me.

            Fred


            --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, "Carole Carriker" <CcSelene7@...> wrote:
            >
            > Go ahead and call me crazy if you want. I recently bought an "energy
            > pillow" from Aulterra. (www.aulterra.com <http://www.aulterra.com/> if
            > anybody wants to try one; they're rather pricey though. I'm not
            trying to
            > sell them; I have no interest in the company.) It was recommended
            to me by
            > a relative as something that would help me sleep. Anyway, it came
            > yesterday, and in playing around with it I noticed that it does
            muffle the
            > hum somewhat. It's filled with some sort of pulverized minerals; I
            wonder
            > if more of the same stuff would block the hum. Just thought I'd
            throw that
            > in.
            >
            >
            >
            > Carole
            >
            >
            >
            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: humforum@yahoogroups.com [mailto:humforum@yahoogroups.com] On
            Behalf
            > Of Tobypaws2002@...
            > Sent: Saturday, February 24, 2007 12:49 PM
            > To: humforum@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: Re: HUM_FORUM: soundproofing
            >
            >
            >
            > In a message dated 29/01/2007 20:42:09 GMT Standard Time,
            > lgeorge@... writes:
            >
            > How did you soundproof it?
            >
            > Phil Strong wrote:
            >
            > > HI,
            > >
            > > Yes we have used a sound proofed room. The hum gets louder.
            > > This was another evidence of the source being internal within the
            > > inner ear.
            > >
            > > Phil
            > >
            > >
            >
            > Hi, Phil,
            >
            > Sorry, but that is not proof that the Hum you hear is internal to
            yourself.
            >
            > It could also be the Hum coming through the soundproofing, because
            of its
            > long wavelength.
            >
            > Apparently you need solid rock or metal, several metres thick, all
            round,
            > including ceilings and floor, with no air gaps, to have any chance of
            > blocking low frequency noise.
            >
            > R.M.
            >
            > LFNS helpline, England.
            >
          • Tobypaws2002@aol.com
            In a message dated 25/02/2007 14:17:36 GMT Standard Time, fkokaska@yahoo.com writes: I have had the best results with using an air filter near my bed to mask
            Message 5 of 9 , Feb 25 11:02 AM
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              In a message dated 25/02/2007 14:17:36 GMT Standard Time, fkokaska@... writes:
              I have had the best results with using an air filter near my bed to
              mask the hum. I experimented with various "white noise" generators
              (soothing sound generators, etc.) but found that most of the seemed to
              resonate or "beat" with the hum.

              But the mechanical fan/filter seems to massk it the best for me.

              Fred
              Hi all,
              I've been advocating small air fans and small air cleaners
              (I bought Remington brand, three or four over sveral years,
              and at one time strung them up on string from the ceiling
              round my pillow.)for many years now : they are better than
               big fans, as the latter often
              make an annoying hum themselves!
              The 'Sound Conditioners' (Noise Maskers) that are available
               to buy (I saw and heard one at about £80 U.K.Sterling) can
               make a steady hiss, or other choice of sound, and they seem
              to be hopeful for :
              1) turning one's attention slightly away from the incoming noise,
              2) counteracting to some extent the lower frequencies involved
              in the 'classic' Hum.
              I hope that as soon as possible some enterprising,
               sympathetic manufacturer will make a powerful Active
              Noise Control device for inside a room plagued with LFN.
              Active Noise Control headsets are available
              (best are pilots' ones,e.g., by Bose,  but expensive
              at about £900 U.K. Sterling).
              What would be marvellous would be a device sensitive
              enough to pick up subtle LFN, and reverse polarity, thus
              cancelling the incoming drone, and providing a 'sanctuary'
              for a Hum sufferer to escape to, and rest in.
               
              Best Wishes,
              R.M.
              LFNS Helpline, England.
            • Phil Strong
              Hi, That depends on the chamber, each chamber will have an attenuation curve which will fall off at the low end as the frequency goes down. Most acoustic
              Message 6 of 9 , Mar 2, 2007
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                Hi,

                 

                That depends on the chamber, each chamber will have an attenuation curve which will fall off at the low end as the frequency goes down.  Most acoustic chambers of this type are good to well below the 56Hz that the Hum is at, so I would have to disagree there.

                 

                Regards

                 

                Phil


                From: humforum@yahoogroups.com [mailto: humforum@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Tobypaws2002@...
                Sent: Sunday, 25 February 2007 9:49 a.m.
                To: humforum@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: HUM_FORUM: soundproofing

                 

                In a message dated 29/01/2007 20:42:09 GMT Standard Time, lgeorge@ocotillo. com writes:

                How did you soundproof it?

                Phil Strong wrote:

                > HI,
                >
                > Yes we have used a sound proofed room. The hum gets louder.
                > This was another evidence of the source being internal within the
                > inner ear.
                >
                > Phil
                >
                >

                Hi, Phil,

                Sorry, but that is not proof that the Hum you hear is internal to yourself.

                It could also be the Hum coming through the soundproofing, because of its long wavelength.

                Apparently you need solid rock or metal, several metres thick, all round, including ceilings and floor, with no air gaps, to have any chance of blocking low frequency noise.

                R.M.

                LFNS helpline, England .


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