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GWEN radiation sources

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  • Bill Curry
    Hi folks, Some previous contributions to this forum mentined the possible role of the Ground Wave Emergency Network as being contributory to the Hum. I looked
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 1, 2004
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      Hi folks,
          Some previous contributions to this forum mentined the possible role of the Ground Wave Emergency Network as being contributory to the Hum.  I looked on the internet, and the only reliable information that I can find indicated that the original GWEN network stations had frequencies in the range 150 - 175 kHz.  However, as far as I know, the GWEN network was taken over for conversion to NDGPS stations.  D stands for "differential," and this network is apparently used to reduce navigational errors associated with navigation systems based on the global positioning satellites.  I think the Coast Guard runs the network now, so the N in NDGPS may  refer to "nautical" or to "navigation."  I am not sure about this, but what is definite is that the system now operates at frequencies near 300 MHz.  These frequencies are too low to cause microwave hearing, but I would like to know whether anyone knows of any other potential mechanism that might connect this type of network with the Hum.  Incidentally, I have detected signals at 300 kHz, using my spectrum analyzer.
      |Bill P. Curry, Ph.D.            Physics is fun|
      |(630) 858-9377        Fax (630) 858-9159|
      |      EMSciTeck Consulting Company     |
    • P. Crawford
      Dear Bill, Thank you for your Jan. 31 letter. Someone knowledgeable about radios and antennas helped me understand it. Things got funny when we explored the
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 1, 2004
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        Dear Bill, Thank you for your Jan. 31 letter. Someone
        knowledgeable about radios and antennas helped me
        understand it. Things got funny when we explored the
        idea of how to cover my head or ears with lead. I
        tried stainless steel bowls this morning at my
        sister's suggestion. Also covered some roof skylights
        today that contain silver.
        <http://www.vlf.it/frequency/bands.html> is a link
        that defines frequency bands (elf-ehf), which may be
        helpful to other non-science people like myself.
        I look forward to knowing what others in the forum are
        doing and thinking after reading your post.
        Still humming here. Patty
        Grass Valley, CA (~75 miles west of Lake Tahoe in the
        Sierra foothills)


        --- Bill Curry <bpcurry@...> wrote:
        > Hi folks,
        > Some previous contributions to this forum
        > mentined the possible role of the Ground Wave
        > Emergency Network as being contributory to the Hum.
        > I looked on the internet, and the only reliable
        > information that I can find indicated that the
        > original GWEN network stations had frequencies in
        > the range 150 - 175 kHz. However, as far as I know,
        > the GWEN network was taken over for conversion to
        > NDGPS stations. D stands for "differential," and
        > this network is apparently used to reduce
        > navigational errors associated with navigation
        > systems based on the global positioning satellites.
        > I think the Coast Guard runs the network now, so the
        > N in NDGPS may refer to "nautical" or to
        > "navigation." I am not sure about this, but what is
        > definite is that the system now operates at
        > frequencies near 300 MHz. These frequencies are too
        > low to cause microwave hearing, but I would like to
        > know whether anyone knows of any other potential
        > mechanism that might connect this type of network
        > with the Hum. Incidentally, I have detected signals
        > at 300 kHz, using my spectrum analyzer.
        > |Bill P. Curry, Ph.D. Physics is fun|
        > |(630) 858-9377 Fax (630) 858-9159|
        > | EMSciTeck Consulting Company |


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      • Haunted Florida
        Hello Everyone- Well, the hum is unusually loud tonight. It s also interesting that a weather front is passing. In any event, the hum is loud enough thatI
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 7, 2004
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          Hello Everyone-

          Well, the hum is unusually loud tonight. It's also
          interesting that a weather front is passing. In any
          event, the hum is loud enough thatI could hear it
          several times through conversation. We had several
          visitors at my house and were at a party earlier today
          (20 miles away). the hum was clear in both locations
          but louder at night. It's 1AM EST, and it comes in
          clear.

          Manny
          Miami, FL

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        • Jean
          ... [...] ... but what is definite is that the system now operates at frequencies near 300 kHz. Much information about the DGPS is available on the website
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 18, 2004
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            --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, "Bill Curry" <bpcurry@w...> wrote:
            [...]
            >as far as I know, the GWEN network was taken over for conversion to
            >NDGPS stations. D stands for "differential," and this network is
            >apparently used to reduce navigational errors associated with
            >navigation systems based on the global positioning satellites.
            >I think the Coast Guard runs the network now, so the N in NDGPS may
            >refer to "nautical" or to "navigation." I am not sure about this,
            but >what is definite is that the system now operates at frequencies
            near >300 kHz.

            Much information about the DGPS is available on the website of the US
            Coast Guard, at http://www.navcen.uscg.gov/dgps/dgeninfo/Default.htm
            The different sections include general information, technical
            information, current status of the stations, network maps, etc.
            Similar information about the canadian portion of the DGPS is
            available on the website of the Canadian Coast Guard at
            http://www.ccg-gcc.gc.ca/dgps/main_e.htm

            It seems that the 'N' stands for 'nationwide'. From what I understand
            from the above sources, the DGPS stations were originally more
            concentrated along the coastal areas, for maritime navigation, and the
            system was run by the Coast Guard (by the respective Coast Guards in
            the US and in Canada). In more recent years, it has been decided to
            expand the DGPS more in the non coastal areas, for terrestrial and
            other purposes, and, in the US, the system is now run jointly by three
            bodies. As you said, the current NDGPS expansion is being done in
            part by turning some pre-existing GWEN stations into DGPS stations, as
            well as by building new DGPS stations. I guess the 'N' was included
            into the NDGPS acronym with the idea of distanciating the expanding
            system from the maritime connotation that was originally associated
            with the DGPS. Ironically, this addition may have just the opposite
            effect if people spontaneously interpret it as 'nautical' or
            'navigation'. Anyway, practically, I think it's more simple to just
            speak of the DGPS.

            With very few exceptions, all DGPS stations in the world seem to
            operate at frequencies ranging from 283,5 to 325 kHz. The list of
            stations changes quite often, as new stations are being added (and
            some stations are sometimes decommissioned). In addition to the lists
            of stations available on the Coast Guards' websites mentioned above,
            several other lists of DGPS stations and their frequencies are
            available on the web. For example, here's one list of the DGPS
            stations in the world, current as of December 2003, sorted by
            frequency: http://beaconworld.org.uk/membersarea/i
            nfo/worldDGPSfreqs.pdf

            Jean Dufresne
            Quebec, QC, Canada
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