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  • humshaker2003
    LONDON (Reuters) - If you think video games are engrossing now, just wait: PlayStation maker Sony Corp (SNE.N). has been granted a patent for beaming sensory
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 6 9:17 PM
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      LONDON (Reuters) - If you think video games are engrossing now, just wait:
      PlayStation maker Sony Corp (SNE.N). has been granted a patent for beaming
      sensory information directly into the brain.
      The technique could one day be used to create videogames in which you can smell,
      taste, and touch, or to help people who are blind or deaf.
      The U.S. patent, granted to Sony researcher Thomas Dawson, describes a
      technique for aiming ultrasonic pulses at specific areas of the brain to induce
      "sensory experiences" such as smells, sounds and images.
      "The pulsed ultrasonic signal alters the neural timing in the cortex," the patent
      states. "No invasive surgery is needed to assist a person, such as a blind person, to
      view live and/or recorded images or hear sounds."
      According to New Scientist magazine, the first to report on the patent, Sony's
      technique could be an improvement over an existing non-surgical method known
      as transcranial magnetic stimulation. This activates nerves using rapidly changing
      magnetic fields, but cannot be focused on small groups of brain cells.
      Niels Birbaumer, a neuroscientist at the University of Tuebingen in Germany, told
      New Scientist he had looked at the Sony patent and "found it plausible." Birbaumer
      himself has developed a device that enables disabled people to communicate by
      reading their brain waves.
      A Sony Electronics spokeswoman told the magazine that no experiments had been
      conducted, and that the patent "was based on an inspiration that this may someday
      be the direction that technology will take us."
    • Patty
      Here s the link to the New Scientist article mentioned in the Reuters information provided by Humshaker.
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 7 1:56 PM
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        Here's the link to the New Scientist article mentioned in the Reuters
        information provided by Humshaker.
        <http://www.newscientist.com/article.ns?id=mg18624944.600>

        Note: Inventor of the Sony patent lives in San Diego, CA. Weren't
        there several posts recently about significant hum activity and
        actions in a San Diego,CA neighborhood concerning the hum?

        Patty
        CA/US


        --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, "humshaker2003" <e-ken@s...> wrote:
        >
        > LONDON (Reuters) - If you think video games are engrossing now,
        just wait:
        > PlayStation maker Sony Corp (SNE.N). has been granted a patent for
        beaming
        > sensory information directly into the brain.
        > The technique could one day be used to create videogames in which
        you can smell,
        > taste, and touch, or to help people who are blind or deaf.
        > The U.S. patent, granted to Sony researcher Thomas Dawson, describes a
        > technique for aiming ultrasonic pulses at specific areas of the
        brain to induce
        > "sensory experiences" such as smells, sounds and images.
        > "The pulsed ultrasonic signal alters the neural timing in the
        cortex," the patent
        > states. "No invasive surgery is needed to assist a person, such as a
        blind person, to
        > view live and/or recorded images or hear sounds."
        > According to New Scientist magazine, the first to report on the
        patent, Sony's
        > technique could be an improvement over an existing non-surgical
        method known
        > as transcranial magnetic stimulation. This activates nerves using
        rapidly changing
        > magnetic fields, but cannot be focused on small groups of brain cells.
        > Niels Birbaumer, a neuroscientist at the University of Tuebingen in
        Germany, told
        > New Scientist he had looked at the Sony patent and "found it
        plausible." Birbaumer
        > himself has developed a device that enables disabled people to
        communicate by
        > reading their brain waves.
        > A Sony Electronics spokeswoman told the magazine that no
        experiments had been
        > conducted, and that the patent "was based on an inspiration that
        this may someday
        > be the direction that technology will take us."
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