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Re: HUM_FORUM: "Hearing" Radio Waves

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  • P. Crawford
    I read a paper about the auditory effects of pulsed RFR at . This paper included a quote by Dr. Chou referred to in
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 29, 2004
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      I read a paper about the auditory effects of pulsed
      RFR at <http://www.wave-guide.org/library/lai.html>.
      This paper included a quote by Dr. Chou referred to in
      one of the posts between Bill Curry and Jean in
      Canada.

      "...one hears sound because a miniscule wave of
      pressure is set up within the head and is detected at
      the cochlea when the absorbed microwave pulse is
      converted to thermal energy," Chou et al [1982].

      Looking at the hum from this possiblity v. an acoustic
      source, I found relief for the first time last night
      by (don't laugh) putting drinking cups, heavy plastic
      ones, over both ears. It even seemed to work with one
      cup over just one ear. This experiment occured to me
      after forum discussions about seashells.

      If I cup my hands over my ears--the hum goes away. If
      I take my cupped hands away, the sounds doesn't return
      immediately--it takes a minute or two.
      Patty
      Sierra fotthills, CA

      --- David Deming <profdeming@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > From: "Bill Curry" <bpcurry@...>
      > > To: <humforum@yahoogroups.com>
      > > Subject: Re: HUM_FORUM: antenna terminology
      > "skip"
      > > Date: Sat, Feb 28, 2004, 5:52 PM
      > >
      > > Jean,
      > > Here are some more responses to the questions
      > you asked in your post of
      > > Feb. 24. One of the questions you asked was about
      > whether transduction of
      > > RF pulses to acoustic pulses could occur in a fuid
      > that had some of the
      > > properties of uman tissue. (If I previously
      > answered this question, please
      > > excuse the repetition.) In the review article
      > that I previously mentioned
      > > by Elder and Chou, it is mentioned that pressure
      > waves have been detected by
      > > immersing a hydrophone in water and KCl solution
      > sufficiently dilute to have
      > > the electrical conductuivity of tissue, when these
      > fluids were subjected to
      > > pulsed RF radiation of the type that had been
      > found to cause microwave
      > > hearing in humans. In addition, in vitro
      > experiments detected acoustic
      > > pulses in blood, muscle, and brain tissue
      > irradiated by RF pulses. All this
      > > tends to substantiate the notion that microwave
      > hearing is a thermoelastic
      > > mechanism at comparatively large energy deposition
      > rates (4 microjoules/gram
      > > in times of the order 10 microseconds), but the
      > possibility of an alternate
      > > mechanism at much lower energy deposition rates
      > has not been completely
      > > eliminated, in my opinon.
      > >
      >
      > I agree.
      >
      > Years ago, the idea of people "hearing" radio waves
      > sounded kooky
      > to me.
      >
      > But radio waves are attenuated in the human body,
      > just as they
      > are in seawater. The energy has to go somewhere.
      > If not heat,
      > then vibration.
      >
      > An experiment that needs to be done is to see how
      > people react
      > to radio energy in the range of, say, 40-120
      > Hz---the same frequency
      > range that people perceive the Hum to be in.
      >
      > --David Deming
      > Norman, Oklahoma
      >


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    • Angelo Campanella
      ... OK Those article do a fair job in describing what HAARP is. It seems that there are two frequency ranges claimed; one in the radio HF range, above 3 mHz,
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 29, 2004
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        At 11:27 PM 2/29/2004 +0000, you wrote:
        >Angelo,
        >
        >Are you familiar with the supposed HAARP ELF transmissions said to be
        >used by the military to communicate with submarines? There is a
        >discussion on it at http://www.brojon.com/frontpage/bj1204.html. The
        >tone is rather conspiracy-theory but if true...
        >
        >A more recent article from the same author proposes that charged
        >particles are being shot back and forth between magnetic poles of the
        >earth along the magnetic field lines, which, if I'm not mistaken,
        >would cause generation of EMR in Schumann resonance ranges - 7-50 Hz.
        >
        >http://www.brojon.org/frontpage/bj1203.html

        OK Those article do a fair job in describing what HAARP is. It
        seems that there are two frequency ranges claimed; one in the radio HF
        range, above 3 mHz, the characteristics of which every old radio Ham knows
        like the back of his hand, and the low audio end and down to 1 Hz and less.
        I feel that I can safely say that, were these low audio waves were strong
        enough to bother humans, they would be very easy to detect, and hence be
        well known to audiophiles as they likely would permeate their audio
        preamplifiers as unwanted "hum" amplified and subsequently quenched by
        their trouble-shooting, and certainly a topic of endless conversation by them.

        Angelo Campanella
      • iprefertruth
        ... be ... The ... the ... Hz. ... it ... likely, ... being ... I have yet to read anything that makes me even start to think that people can hear radio
        Message 3 of 9 , Mar 1, 2004
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          --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, "hortonhearsahum"
          <hortonhearsahum@y...> wrote:
          > Angelo,
          >
          > Are you familiar with the supposed HAARP ELF transmissions said to
          be
          > used by the military to communicate with submarines? There is a
          > discussion on it at http://www.brojon.com/frontpage/bj1204.html.
          The
          > tone is rather conspiracy-theory but if true...
          >
          > A more recent article from the same author proposes that charged
          > particles are being shot back and forth between magnetic poles of
          the
          > earth along the magnetic field lines, which, if I'm not mistaken,
          > would cause generation of EMR in Schumann resonance ranges - 7-50
          Hz.
          >
          > http://www.brojon.org/frontpage/bj1203.html
          >
          > Bill Curry has read at least the latter article and not dismissed
          it
          > out of hand.
          >
          > --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, Angelo Campanella
          > <a.campanella@a...> wrote:
          > > Radio waves are hardly produced at 40-120 Hz. More
          likely,
          > the
          > > radio waves are at some radio frequency, the lowest I know of
          being
          > about
          > > 7,000 Hz for old fashioned long wave telegraphy and submarine
          > > communications, the transmitters of which are few, far between,
          > already
          > > known, and are most often quite remote from most cities.

          I have yet to read anything that makes me even start to think that
          people can 'hear' radio waves. We just have not the capacity, having
          evolved to respond to frequencies in the range of about 20 to 20,000
          Hz. But if anyone can explain he mecahinism involved, then naturally
          one would at least consider it. I really expect that most Hums will
          be the result of acoustic low frequency noise in the air, travelling
          out from the many and various industrial and commercial operations
          all over the world. I suspect it travels out(depending on initial
          loudeness at source, naturally) ....several miles from its source,
          and that wind can deflect it. If a hearer is between several sources,
          then wind will not make such a difference, and will possibly
          encourage the hearer to think of more exotic theories. I really
          would like to see common sense driving our enquiries, we need to
          exhaust all the acoustic airborne sources first, before being
          diverted into theories about radio waves, etc.That's my opinion.
          As I see it , from what I can understand of the figures quoted here
          and there, the amplitude of radio waves/whatever is far too small to
          elicit a perception of sound in people's ears. I have heard of
          specific tests being done under very particular circumstances, where
          the experimenters thought they had discovered that people
          could 'hear' microwaves, but I would want to know how the amplitude
          and proximity of their source compares with the levels of m/w's in
          the environment, I suspect theirs was much stronger....? Is it
          measured in milliwatts per square centimetre?
        • Tobypaws2002@aol.com
          In a message dated 01/03/2004 13:26:15 GMT Standard Time, ... Maybe I m ignorant, but I didn t know radio waves went down that far.....40Hz?
          Message 4 of 9 , Mar 3, 2004
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            In a message dated 01/03/2004 13:26:15 GMT Standard Time, sugarpineinc@... writes:

            An experiment that needs to be done is to see how
            >people react
            >to radio energy in the range of, say, 40-120
            >Hz---the same frequency
            >range that people perceive the Hum to be in.
            >
            >--David Deming
            >Norman, Oklahoma

            Maybe I'm ignorant, but I didn't know radio waves went down that far.....40Hz?
          • hotnite2
            ... See my reply post to low freq test a few msgs back. Not only is it possible, the Navy has systems in Michigan and Wisconsin that use low freqs,
            Message 5 of 9 , Mar 3, 2004
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              --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, Tobypaws2002@a... wrote:
              > In a message dated 01/03/2004 13:26:15 GMT Standard Time,
              > sugarpineinc@y... writes:
              >
              > > An experiment that needs to be done is to see how
              > > >people react
              > > >to radio energy in the range of, say, 40-120
              > > >Hz---the same frequency
              > > >range that people perceive the Hum to be in.
              > > >
              > > >--David Deming
              > > >Norman, Oklahoma
              > >
              > Maybe I'm ignorant, but I didn't know radio waves went down that
              > far.....40Hz?


              See my reply post to "low freq test" a few msgs back. Not only is
              it possible, the Navy has systems in Michigan and Wisconsin that use
              low freqs, somewhere around 76hz, to communicate with subs deep in
              the ocean every day. They use antennas from 14 to 56 miles long
              (one reason why no one else would want to do this) and power of
              about .75 Mwatts. The purpose is to be able to penetrate deep
              water, without the sub needing to be near the surface, where it
              would be detected.

              Since this system is designed to have these signals received half
              way around the world, it looks to me like a good candidate for a
              possible source.

              Russsia, England and God only knows who else are reported to have
              similar systems.
            • Tobypaws2002@aol.com
              In a message dated 04/03/2004 13:31:31 GMT Standard Time, ... But if the system directs the signals at subs deep in the ocean, how would they get anywhere near
              Message 6 of 9 , Mar 4, 2004
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                In a message dated 04/03/2004 13:31:31 GMT Standard Time, horizon99@... writes:

                --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, Tobypaws2002@a... wrote:
                >In a message dated 01/03/2004 13:26:15 GMT Standard Time,
                >sugarpineinc@y... writes:
                >
                >>An experiment that needs to be done is to see how
                >>>people react
                >>>to radio energy in the range of, say, 40-120
                >>>Hz---the same frequency
                >>>range that people perceive the Hum to be in.
                >>>
                >>>--David Deming
                >>>Norman, Oklahoma
                >>
                >Maybe I'm ignorant, but I didn't know radio waves went down that
                >far.....40Hz?


                See my reply post to "low freq test" a few msgs back.  Not only is
                it possible, the Navy has systems in Michigan and Wisconsin that use
                low freqs, somewhere around 76hz, to communicate with subs deep in
                the ocean every day.  They use antennas from 14 to 56 miles long
                (one reason why no one else would want to do this) and power of
                about .75 Mwatts.  The purpose is to be able to penetrate deep
                water, without the sub needing to be near the surface, where it
                would be detected.

                Since this system is designed to have these signals received half
                way around the world, it looks to me like a good candidate for a
                possible source.

                Russsia, England and God only knows who else are reported to have
                similar systems. 


                But if the system directs the signals at subs deep in the ocean, how would they get anywhere near humans? Didn't someone write that the antennae (?) were buried in the earth? I can't see how anything could go through so much earth and still get through the sea, to be received by sub's.....maybe that's not how they travel...?   I thought  that when signals travel through one medium then try to pass into another, they lose a lot of their energy.........'75 MWatts? Megawatts? Does that mean a huge signal at source, that has to be huge to allow lots of loss along the way? 
                If it were causing the Hum, what could block it, as an experiment? Would a human size metal box do? A lead helmet?
                Thanks for trying to clarify it anyway....it's quite complicated !
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