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Doppler Effect Possibility

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  • Mark Jordan
    Hi to all, I have another question. Please respond as every detail is important. When you perceive the hum, do you feel that the noise is possibly a constant
    Message 1 of 16 , Nov 4, 2012
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      Hi to all,

      I have another question. Please respond as every detail is important.

      When you perceive the hum, do you feel that the noise is possibly a constant stream propagating from one direction to another or do you perceive that the noise is somewhere in the distance emanating from a single point?

      If you perceive that the sound is coming from a specific direction, does this change when you turn your back towards the perceived sound? If from a specific direction, does the sound change as you rotate your body or head in a slow circle?

      Do any of you perceive the noise as coming from all directions or from above?

      When traveling in a vehicle of any type, do you perceive any differences in the hum?

      Do you perceive any type of echo effect in the hum?

      When the hum is really bad, do you have the sensation that time is dragging or do you feel like time "flies" or passes by faster?. In other words, do your days seem to go by faster or slower during extreme periods?

      Do you ever experience missing time or lost time?


      Mark S. Jordan
      zorbasci@...




    • Steve Kohlhase
      .      ________________________________ From: Mark Jordan zorbasci@yahoo.com  To: humforum@yahoogroups.com Sent: Sunday,
      Message 2 of 16 , Nov 4, 2012
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        From: Mark Jordan zorbasci@...
         
         To: "humforum@yahoogroups.com" <humforum@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Sunday, November 4, 2012 11:19 AM
        Subject: HUM_FORUM: Doppler Effect Possibility
         
        Hi to all,

        I have another question. Please respond as every detail is important.

        When you perceive the hum, do you feel that the noise is possibly a constant stream propagating from one direction to another or do you perceive that the noise is somewhere in the distance emanating from a single point? -- Non directional, not a single point and impossible to listen your way to more intense locations, senses worsen the higher floors in my wood structure home, although in my company office 15 miles away, concrete construction, the subterrain basement location is at a different reasonant frequency and far more hurtful.

        If you perceive that the sound is coming from a specific direction, does this change when you turn your back towards the perceived sound? If from a specific direction, does the sound change as you rotate your body or head in a slow circle?-- No change other than sticking your head downwards accentuates the inner ear hum

        Do any of you perceive the noise as coming from all directions or from above? inside the home from everywhere,  although charateristics change as does the intensity over periods

        When traveling in a vehicle of any type, do you perceive any differences in the hum? Extreme levels in parked turned off vehicles (doesn't matter what kind).  Running masks the hum.  The floor boards at times vibrate as bad as teh home at times.

        Do you perceive any type of echo effect in the hum? aeoilian effect, no echo

        When the hum is really bad, do you have the sensation that time is dragging or do you feel like time "flies" or passes by faster?. In other words, do your days seem to go by faster or slower during extreme periods? No

        Do you ever experience missing time or lost time? I beleive my concentration has been affected, more forgetful.  Just like the vibroacoustic study have shown
         
        Keep asking!  These are not only my observtions, many others I discuss with are astonsihed that they too have these sysmptoms and do say " by the way I wondered what that LF noise is".
         
        Steve


        Mark S. Jordan
        zorbasci@...




      • lidia1313
        Hi, Mark, Thanks for the questions. I will have a busy week, so will answer now. I cannot pinpoint the direction of the noise,but my perception is that it
        Message 3 of 16 , Nov 4, 2012
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          Hi, Mark,
          Thanks for the questions. I will have a busy week, so will answer now.
          I cannot pinpoint the direction of the noise,but my perception is that it comes stronger from the window. If I am in the bath (no windows), then it comes from the ventilation. Sticking my ears to the walls (internal and external) makes the Hum dissapear. Hum intensity varies (usually worst when is raining, same for vibrations intensity). When the Hum is loud, all other LF Noises are also amplified (like trains that could be heard rumbling under the bridge, 300 -400 m away) and the water bottles (half empty) are making popping sounds.

          The sound does not change upon changing my body position, although to me it seems more loud when lying down than while standing up.

          The Hum sound seems to come from all directions (but mostly external walls and windows), and also, sometimes from above, depending on the Hum intensity. If it is too loud, it seems like coming from above. But the vibrations come from underneath, except for when I feel that something is firing off a horizontal wave of energy towards my body parts (and then my muscles twitch and vibrate).

          I already have described the car effect, while being on an island (no gas pipelines, no trains, no heavy industry) where no indoors Hum was perceived. I heard the Hum after a trip by car, immediately after I got off. It was a deep, bass, hugely profound Hum, deafening and overwhelming, and it was a complete silence in the night otherwise. Near me, 50 to 100 m away, were the overhead powerlines. The sound lasted about 5 seconds, and only after I stopped hearing the Hum, my body was striken by vibrations, running from my feet, and through my chakras! The second time I heard the Hum for a few seconds on that island, was inside the car, after a trip, and after the engine was switched off! As soon as I got out, the Hum was gone.

          No echo perceived, but when the Hum is loud, all other noises are magnified, to the point that I can hear my downstairs neighbour mumbling in their sleep (with microphone effect!)Lol

          Time is always dragging when the Hum is loud and vibrations bad!

          Never experienced a missing time, but sometimes a deja-vu. Also short memory loss, and greater forgetfulness... When the Hum is quiet, I have very vivid dreams.

          Regards,
          Lidia


          --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, Mark Jordan <zorbasci@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi to all,
          >
          > I have another question. Please respond as every detail is important.
          >
          > When you perceive the hum, do you feel that the noise is possibly a constant stream propagating from one direction to another or do you perceive that the noise is somewhere in the distance emanating from a single point?
          >
          > If you perceive that the sound is coming from a specific direction, does this change when you turn your back towards the perceived sound?If from a specific direction, does the sound change as you rotate your body or head in a slow circle?
          >
          >
          > Do any of you perceive the noise as coming from all directions or from above?
          >
          > When traveling in a vehicle of any type, do you perceive any differences in the hum?
          >
          > Do you perceive any type of echo effect in the hum?
          >
          > When the hum is really bad, do you have the sensation that time is dragging or do you feel like time "flies" or passes by faster?. In other words, do your days seem to go by faster or slower during extreme periods?
          >
          > Do you ever experience missing time or lost time?
          >
          >
          >
          > Mark S. Jordan
          > zorbasci@...
          >
        • Tobypaws2002@aol.com
          ____________________________________ From: lidia1313@yahoo.com Reply-to: humforum@yahoogroups.com To: humforum@yahoogroups.com Sent: 05/11/2012 00:52:06 GMT
          Message 4 of 16 , Nov 4, 2012
          • 0 Attachment
             
             

            From: lidia1313@...
            Reply-to: humforum@yahoogroups.com
            To: humforum@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: 05/11/2012 00:52:06 GMT Standard Time
            Subj: HUM_FORUM: Re: Doppler Effect Possibility
             
            Also short memory loss, and greater forgetfulness... When the Hum is quiet, I have very vivid dreams.

            Regards,
            Lidia
            Hi, Lidia,
            May I just suggest a few brief ideas about the last part of your message.
             
             Short ('term'?)memory loss :
            could be due to sleep loss  : not being able to get the natural refreshing sleep we all need to saty feeling well...
             
            Forgetfulness : ditto..
             
            Vivid dreams when hum is quiet : that could be because your sleep was unsatisfactory due to disturbance/unease from the  Hum, and so when it went quiet, your brain was more able to do its healthy rhythms/cycles/stages : a sort of catching-up or recovery process.
            Please try to keep your physical health up, and seek out anything (within reason) that might reduce stress.
            Best Wishes,
            R.M.
            LFNSH, England.

             
          • Soozie
            I totally agree with these statements! Suzie ________________________________ From: Tobypaws2002@aol.com To: humforum@yahoogroups.com
            Message 5 of 16 , Nov 5, 2012
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              I totally agree with these statements!
              Suzie

              From: "Tobypaws2002@..." <Tobypaws2002@...>
              To: humforum@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Sunday, November 4, 2012 8:23 PM
              Subject: Re: HUM_FORUM: Re: Doppler Effect Possibility
               
               
               
              From: lidia1313@... Reply-to: humforum@yahoogroups.com To: humforum@yahoogroups.com Sent: 05/11/2012 00:52:06 GMT Standard Time Subj: HUM_FORUM: Re: Doppler Effect Possibility
               
              Also short memory loss, and greater forgetfulness... When the Hum is quiet, I have very vivid dreams.

              Regards,
              Lidia
              Hi, Lidia,
              May I just suggest a few brief ideas about the last part of your message.
               
               Short ('term'?)memory loss :
              could be due to sleep loss  : not being able to get the natural refreshing sleep we all need to saty feeling well...
               
              Forgetfulness : ditto..
               
              Vivid dreams when hum is quiet : that could be because your sleep was unsatisfactory due to disturbance/unease from the  Hum, and so when it went quiet, your brain was more able to do its healthy rhythms/cycles/stages : a sort of catching-up or recovery process.
              Please try to keep your physical health up, and seek out anything (within reason) that might reduce stress.
              Best Wishes,
              R.M.
              LFNSH, England.

               
            • Soozie
              Mark,  My perception of my hum is that is comes from everywhere, there is no direction of source as far as I can discern. It sounds like it s coming from all
              Message 6 of 16 , Nov 5, 2012
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                Mark,
                 My perception of my hum is that is comes from everywhere, there is no direction of source as far as I can discern. It sounds like it's coming from all directions and not from above. It does not change no matter which way I turn my body or head. I do not hear the hum while driving because the sounds inside the vehicle drown it out. There has never been any echo, no time changes that I have noticed, and no missing time.
                Suzie

                From: Mark Jordan <zorbasci@...>
                To: "humforum@yahoogroups.com" <humforum@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Sunday, November 4, 2012 10:19 AM
                Subject: HUM_FORUM: Doppler Effect Possibility
                 
                Hi to all,

                I have another question. Please respond as every detail is important.

                When you perceive the hum, do you feel that the noise is possibly a constant stream propagating from one direction to another or do you perceive that the noise is somewhere in the distance emanating from a single point?

                If you perceive that the sound is coming from a specific direction, does this change when you turn your back towards the perceived sound? If from a specific direction, does the sound change as you rotate your body or head in a slow circle?

                Do any of you perceive the noise as coming from all directions or from above?

                When traveling in a vehicle of any type, do you perceive any differences in the hum?

                Do you perceive any type of echo effect in the hum?

                When the hum is really bad, do you have the sensation that time is dragging or do you feel like time "flies" or passes by faster?. In other words, do your days seem to go by faster or slower during extreme periods?

                Do you ever experience missing time or lost time?


                Mark S. Jordan
                zorbasci@...




              • Kevin Hawthorne
                Mark - As I professional sound engineer, one of my habits is to walk into a room or building and pinpoint offending noises - the type which are usually
                Message 7 of 16 , Nov 5, 2012
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                  Mark -

                  As I professional sound engineer, one of my "habits" is to walk into a room or building and pinpoint offending noises - the type which are usually imperceptible to others. On a movie shoot, a refrigerator running in the next room, or an air conditioning system running on the rooftop isn't even on the crew's radar screens until everybody shuts up and the cameras start rolling - at which point the slight hum ruins the resulting film or video. 

                  Most of my experiences with the hum occur in my own home about 40 mile south of Denver, CO. This throbbing, low-frequency, extremely low-amplitude wave is definitely EXTERNAL as opposed to the "in your head" sensation of, say, tinnitus (which I, like most people, have experienced occasionally).

                  It can be perceived only in the "binaural" - i.e., only if one uses BOTH ears.

                  Although I am able to perceive the "hum" in/on ALL levels of my three-level home, it seems to be louder in my basement. My perception is that the hum comes from the earth itself, but uses structures as an "amplifier".

                  Although the sound "throbs" or "pulses" at 1 - 2 hz, the frequency itself seems to center at 34.5 hz regardless of geographic location. There are not many harmonics involved. The pulsing and throbbing also seem to be consistent regardless of geographic location. Amplitude varies greatly day by day / week by week, sometimes almost disappearing for days at a time, but never completely "zero."

                  I have experienced this sound (at exactly the same frequency) at various points around the Intermountain West, including the surrounding foothills in the Denver area, Glenwood Springs, CO and Steamboat Springs, CO, as well as the Vail/Aspen area - and as far west as Salt Lake City, Utah.

                  2 Weeks ago I hiked in the foothills about 15 miles north of Salt Lake City, Utah with the purpose in mind of determining whether or not the Kern River Pipeline (which runs through the high foothills in that area) was the source or in any way affecting the amplitude of the hum. I'm aware of a trail that crosses directly over the pipeline itself. You can stand right on the pipeline at one point. Using foam earplugs (the type I use target shooting with about 25db attenuation of outside noise) are perfect for allowing the hum to come through loud and clear, as they nearly eliminate all other outside noises EXCEPT the hum itself). My "hike" experiment was that the hum seemed to be roughly the same amplitude whether I was standing on the pipeline or miles and miles away from it. Sounds exactly likes it sounds in Denver, 500 or so miles away.

                  The only difference in my perception of the hum between the Denver and Salt Lake City locations, is that it definitely seems to be coming from the west in Denver versus no perception of directionality at ALL in Salt Lake City, This, however, is a common characteristic of low-frequency sounds in general. You can place the "woofer" unit of your stereo system anywhere in the room and it's difficult to pinpoint its location using your ears alone.

                  The amplitude of the hum is so low that it's nearly impossible to record - even with professional digital recording gear. However, if one uses a STEREO microphone of extremely high sensitivity, a serious mic pre-amp and a decent digital recorder, one can verify the "in-person" experience of the frequency heard (again, in my case, it's exactly 34.5hz) by digitally manipulating the resulting recordings and speeding them up by multiples of the original recording speed. For example, digitally doubling the playback speed of the recording (easily done on most semi-pro or pro audio editing software) results (in my experiments) which a frequency of 69hz (34.5 x 2)  clearly identifiable during playback.

                  One can carry a frequency generator in the form of an iphone app which allows one to compare the hum being heard with a known reference source. I have experienced the hum in many, many places and have definitely "sensed" it coming from the earth - not from above - and it has invariably been at exactly 34.5 regardless of location.

                  Hope my experiences help you - or others - identify the source.

                  Yours,

                  Kevin


                  From: Mark Jordan <zorbasci@...>
                  To: "humforum@yahoogroups.com" <humforum@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Sunday, November 4, 2012 9:19 AM
                  Subject: HUM_FORUM: Doppler Effect Possibility

                   
                  Hi to all,

                  I have another question. Please respond as every detail is important.

                  When you perceive the hum, do you feel that the noise is possibly a constant stream propagating from one direction to another or do you perceive that the noise is somewhere in the distance emanating from a single point?

                  If you perceive that the sound is coming from a specific direction, does this change when you turn your back towards the perceived sound? If from a specific direction, does the sound change as you rotate your body or head in a slow circle?

                  Do any of you perceive the noise as coming from all directions or from above?

                  When traveling in a vehicle of any type, do you perceive any differences in the hum?

                  Do you perceive any type of echo effect in the hum?

                  When the hum is really bad, do you have the sensation that time is dragging or do you feel like time "flies" or passes by faster?. In other words, do your days seem to go by faster or slower during extreme periods?

                  Do you ever experience missing time or lost time?


                  Mark S. Jordan
                  zorbasci@...






                • Copsne
                  We had a sleep lab presenter in 3 times over the last year at work. Unbelievable how many people attended. The latest presenter that handles the sleep lab
                  Message 8 of 16 , Nov 5, 2012
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                    We had a sleep lab presenter in 3 times over the last year at work. Unbelievable how many people attended. The latest presenter that handles the sleep lab disoder center at a hospital here showed a chart how the normal sleep pattern goes from deep to light sleep about 8 times a night (non rem to rem). If in the lightest period sleep is disturbed, it can ruin sleep. Also, the saturation of your sleeping quaters with interfering brain wave frequencies that many of us have measured, effects the brains activities 

                    One thing about this hum, forces you to research things you once could care less about

                    Sent from Steve's iPhone and I appologize for typo's

                    On Nov 5, 2012, at 4:08 AM, Soozie <soozieqty1@...> wrote:

                     

                    I totally agree with these statements!
                    Suzie

                    From: "Tobypaws2002@..." <Tobypaws2002@...>
                    To: humforum@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Sunday, November 4, 2012 8:23 PM
                    Subject: Re: HUM_FORUM: Re: Doppler Effect Possibility
                     
                     
                     
                    From: lidia1313@... Reply-to: humforum@yahoogroups.com To: humforum@yahoogroups.com Sent: 05/11/2012 00:52:06 GMT Standard Time Subj: HUM_FORUM: Re: Doppler Effect Possibility
                     
                    Also short memory loss, and greater forgetfulness... When the Hum is quiet, I have very vivid dreams.

                    Regards,
                    Lidia
                    Hi, Lidia,
                    May I just suggest a few brief ideas about the last part of your message.
                     
                     Short ('term'?)memory loss :
                    could be due to sleep loss  : not being able to get the natural refreshing sleep we all need to saty feeling well...
                     
                    Forgetfulness : ditto..
                     
                    Vivid dreams when hum is quiet : that could be because your sleep was unsatisfactory due to disturbance/unease from the  Hum, and so when it went quiet, your brain was more able to do its healthy rhythms/cycles/stages : a sort of catching-up or recovery process.
                    Please try to keep your physical health up, and seek out anything (within reason) that might reduce stress.
                    Best Wishes,
                    R.M.
                    LFNSH, England.

                     

                  • zorbasci
                    Hi Kevin and thanks for responding. In time I would be interested in talking more about your observations. When you went on the hiking trip, were you far away
                    Message 9 of 16 , Nov 5, 2012
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                      Hi Kevin and thanks for responding.

                      In time I would be interested in talking more about your observations. When you went on the hiking trip, were you far away from other types of infrastructure? Can you tell me anything about the particular pipeline that you crossed over?

                      Thanks in advance,


                      Mark S. Jordan
                      zorbasci@...

                      --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, Kevin Hawthorne <skybluepony@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Mark -
                      >
                      > As I professional sound engineer, one of my "habits" is to walk into a room or building and pinpoint offending noises - the type which are usually imperceptible to others. On a movie shoot, a refrigerator running in the next room, or an air conditioning system running on the rooftop isn't even on the crew's radar screens until everybody shuts up and the cameras start rolling - at which point the slight hum ruins the resulting film or video. 
                      >
                      > Most of my experiences with the hum occur in my own home about 40 mile south of Denver, CO. This throbbing, low-frequency, extremely low-amplitude wave is definitely EXTERNAL as opposed to the "in your head" sensation of, say, tinnitus (which I, like most people, have experienced occasionally).
                      >
                      > It can be perceived only in the "binaural" - i.e., only if one uses BOTH ears.
                      >
                      > Although I am able to perceive the "hum" in/on ALL levels of my three-level home, it seems to be louder in my basement. My perception is that the hum comes from the earth itself, but uses structures as an "amplifier".
                      >
                      >
                      > Although the sound "throbs" or "pulses" at 1 - 2 hz, the frequency itself seems to center at 34.5 hz regardless of geographic location. There are not many harmonics involved. The pulsing and throbbing also seem to be consistent regardless of geographic location. Amplitude varies greatly day by day / week by week, sometimes almost disappearing for days at a time, but never completely "zero."
                      >
                      >
                      > I have experienced this sound (at exactly the same frequency) at various points around the Intermountain West, including the surrounding foothills in the Denver area, Glenwood Springs, CO and Steamboat Springs, CO, as well as the Vail/Aspen area - and as far west as Salt Lake City, Utah.
                      >
                      >
                      > 2 Weeks ago I hiked in the foothills about 15 miles north of Salt Lake City, Utah with the purpose in mind of determining whether or not the Kern River Pipeline (which runs through the high foothills in that area) was the source or in any way affecting the amplitude of the hum. I'm aware of a trail that crosses directly over the pipeline itself. You can stand right on the pipeline at one point. Using foam earplugs (the type I use target shooting with about 25db attenuation of outside noise) are perfect for allowing the hum to come through loud and clear, as they nearly eliminate all other outside noises EXCEPT the hum itself). My "hike" experiment was that the hum seemed to be roughly the same amplitude whether I was standing on the pipeline or miles and miles away from it. Sounds exactly likes it sounds in Denver, 500 or so miles away.
                      >
                      >
                      > The only difference in my perception of the hum between the Denver and Salt Lake City locations, is that it definitely seems to be coming from the west in Denver versus no perception of directionality at ALL in Salt Lake City, This, however, is a common characteristic of low-frequency sounds in general. You can place the "woofer" unit of your stereo system anywhere in the room and it's difficult to pinpoint its location using your ears alone.
                      >
                      >
                      > The amplitude of the hum is so low that it's nearly impossible to record - even with professional digital recording gear. However, if one uses a STEREO microphone of extremely high sensitivity, a serious mic pre-amp and a decent digital recorder, one can verify the "in-person" experience of the frequency heard (again, in my case, it's exactly 34.5hz) by digitally manipulating the resulting recordings and speeding them up by multiples of the original recording speed. For example, digitally doubling the playback speed of the recording (easily done on most semi-pro or pro audio editing software) results (in my experiments) which a frequency of 69hz (34.5 x 2)  clearly identifiable during playback.
                      >
                      >
                      > One can carry a frequency generator in the form of an iphone app which allows one to compare the hum being heard with a known reference source. I have experienced the hum in many, many places and have definitely "sensed" it coming from the earth - not from above - and it has invariably been at exactly 34.5 regardless of location.
                      >
                      >
                      > Hope my experiences help you - or others - identify the source.
                      >
                      > Yours,
                      >
                      > Kevin
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > ________________________________
                      > From: Mark Jordan <zorbasci@...>
                      > To: "humforum@yahoogroups.com" <humforum@yahoogroups.com>
                      > Sent: Sunday, November 4, 2012 9:19 AM
                      > Subject: HUM_FORUM: Doppler Effect Possibility
                      >
                      >
                      >  
                      > Hi to all,
                      >
                      > I have another question. Please respond as every detail is important.
                      >
                      > When you perceive the hum, do you feel that the noise is possibly a constant stream propagating from one direction to another or do you perceive that the noise is somewhere in the distance emanating from a single point?
                      >
                      > If you perceive that the sound is coming from a specific direction, does this change when you turn your back towards the perceived sound? If from a specific direction, does the sound change as you rotate your body or head in a slow circle?
                      >
                      >
                      > Do any of you perceive the noise as coming from all directions or from above?
                      >
                      > When traveling in a vehicle of any type, do you perceive any differences in the hum?
                      >
                      > Do you perceive any type of echo effect in the hum?
                      >
                      > When the hum is really bad, do you have the sensation that time is dragging or do you feel like time "flies" or passes by faster?. In other words, do your days seem to go by faster or slower during extreme periods?
                      >
                      > Do you ever experience missing time or lost time?
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Mark S. Jordan
                      > zorbasci@...
                      >
                    • Copsne
                      Check mymap in the files section. You are one of the points Sent from Steve s iPhone and I appologize for typo s
                      Message 10 of 16 , Nov 6, 2012
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                        Check mymap in the files section. You are one of the points

                        Sent from Steve's iPhone and I appologize for typo's

                        On Nov 5, 2012, at 11:12 AM, Kevin Hawthorne <skybluepony@...> wrote:

                         

                        Mark -

                        As I professional sound engineer, one of my "habits" is to walk into a room or building and pinpoint offending noises - the type which are usually imperceptible to others. On a movie shoot, a refrigerator running in the next room, or an air conditioning system running on the rooftop isn't even on the crew's radar screens until everybody shuts up and the cameras start rolling - at which point the slight hum ruins the resulting film or video. 

                        Most of my experiences with the hum occur in my own home about 40 mile south of Denver, CO. This throbbing, low-frequency, extremely low-amplitude wave is definitely EXTERNAL as opposed to the "in your head" sensation of, say, tinnitus (which I, like most people, have experienced occasionally).

                        It can be perceived only in the "binaural" - i.e., only if one uses BOTH ears.

                        Although I am able to perceive the "hum" in/on ALL levels of my three-level home, it seems to be louder in my basement. My perception is that the hum comes from the earth itself, but uses structures as an "amplifier".

                        Although the sound "throbs" or "pulses" at 1 - 2 hz, the frequency itself seems to center at 34.5 hz regardless of geographic location. There are not many harmonics involved. The pulsing and throbbing also seem to be consistent regardless of geographic location. Amplitude varies greatly day by day / week by week, sometimes almost disappearing for days at a time, but never completely "zero."

                        I have experienced this sound (at exactly the same frequency) at various points around the Intermountain West, including the surrounding foothills in the Denver area, Glenwood Springs, CO and Steamboat Springs, CO, as well as the Vail/Aspen area - and as far west as Salt Lake City, Utah.

                        2 Weeks ago I hiked in the foothills about 15 miles north of Salt Lake City, Utah with the purpose in mind of determining whether or not the Kern River Pipeline (which runs through the high foothills in that area) was the source or in any way affecting the amplitude of the hum. I'm aware of a trail that crosses directly over the pipeline itself. You can stand right on the pipeline at one point. Using foam earplugs (the type I use target shooting with about 25db attenuation of outside noise) are perfect for allowing the hum to come through loud and clear, as they nearly eliminate all other outside noises EXCEPT the hum itself). My "hike" experiment was that the hum seemed to be roughly the same amplitude whether I was standing on the pipeline or miles and miles away from it. Sounds exactly likes it sounds in Denver, 500 or so miles away.

                        The only difference in my perception of the hum between the Denver and Salt Lake City locations, is that it definitely seems to be coming from the west in Denver versus no perception of directionality at ALL in Salt Lake City, This, however, is a common characteristic of low-frequency sounds in general. You can place the "woofer" unit of your stereo system anywhere in the room and it's difficult to pinpoint its location using your ears alone.

                        The amplitude of the hum is so low that it's nearly impossible to record - even with professional digital recording gear. However, if one uses a STEREO microphone of extremely high sensitivity, a serious mic pre-amp and a decent digital recorder, one can verify the "in-person" experience of the frequency heard (again, in my case, it's exactly 34.5hz) by digitally manipulating the resulting recordings and speeding them up by multiples of the original recording speed. For example, digitally doubling the playback speed of the recording (easily done on most semi-pro or pro audio editing software) results (in my experiments) which a frequency of 69hz (34.5 x 2)  clearly identifiable during playback.

                        One can carry a frequency generator in the form of an iphone app which allows one to compare the hum being heard with a known reference source. I have experienced the hum in many, many places and have definitely "sensed" it coming from the earth - not from above - and it has invariably been at exactly 34.5 regardless of location.

                        Hope my experiences help you - or others - identify the source.

                        Yours,

                        Kevin


                        From: Mark Jordan <zorbasci@...>
                        To: "humforum@yahoogroups.com" <humforum@yahoogroups.com>
                        Sent: Sunday, November 4, 2012 9:19 AM
                        Subject: HUM_FORUM: Doppler Effect Possibility

                         
                        Hi to all,

                        I have another question. Please respond as every detail is important.

                        When you perceive the hum, do you feel that the noise is possibly a constant stream propagating from one direction to another or do you perceive that the noise is somewhere in the distance emanating from a single point?

                        If you perceive that the sound is coming from a specific direction, does this change when you turn your back towards the perceived sound? If from a specific direction, does the sound change as you rotate your body or head in a slow circle?

                        Do any of you perceive the noise as coming from all directions or from above?

                        When traveling in a vehicle of any type, do you perceive any differences in the hum?

                        Do you perceive any type of echo effect in the hum?

                        When the hum is really bad, do you have the sensation that time is dragging or do you feel like time "flies" or passes by faster?. In other words, do your days seem to go by faster or slower during extreme periods?

                        Do you ever experience missing time or lost time?


                        Mark S. Jordan






                        Reply via web post Reply to sender Reply
                      • Kevin Hawthorne
                        I just studied the map... and I find it very interesting.  Tempted to drive over to central Idaho to see if the hum disappears... =kevin=
                        Message 11 of 16 , Nov 8, 2012
                        • 0 Attachment

                          I just studied the map... and I find it very interesting.  Tempted to drive over to central Idaho to see if the hum disappears...

                          =kevin=


                          From: Copsne <c_o_p_s_ne@...>
                          To: "humforum@yahoogroups.com" <humforum@yahoogroups.com>
                          Sent: Tuesday, November 6, 2012 4:48 PM
                          Subject: Re: HUM_FORUM: Doppler Effect Possibility

                           
                          Check mymap in the files section. You are one of the points

                          Sent from Steve's iPhone and I appologize for typo's

                          On Nov 5, 2012, at 11:12 AM, Kevin Hawthorne <skybluepony@...> wrote:

                           
                          Mark -

                          As I professional sound engineer, one of my "habits" is to walk into a room or building and pinpoint offending noises - the type which are usually imperceptible to others. On a movie shoot, a refrigerator running in the next room, or an air conditioning system running on the rooftop isn't even on the crew's radar screens until everybody shuts up and the cameras start rolling - at which point the slight hum ruins the resulting film or video. 

                          Most of my experiences with the hum occur in my own home about 40 mile south of Denver, CO. This throbbing, low-frequency, extremely low-amplitude wave is definitely EXTERNAL as opposed to the "in your head" sensation of, say, tinnitus (which I, like most people, have experienced occasionally).

                          It can be perceived only in the "binaural" - i.e., only if one uses BOTH ears.

                          Although I am able to perceive the "hum" in/on ALL levels of my three-level home, it seems to be louder in my basement. My perception is that the hum comes from the earth itself, but uses structures as an "amplifier".

                          Although the sound "throbs" or "pulses" at 1 - 2 hz, the frequency itself seems to center at 34.5 hz regardless of geographic location. There are not many harmonics involved. The pulsing and throbbing also seem to be consistent regardless of geographic location. Amplitude varies greatly day by day / week by week, sometimes almost disappearing for days at a time, but never completely "zero."

                          I have experienced this sound (at exactly the same frequency) at various points around the Intermountain West, including the surrounding foothills in the Denver area, Glenwood Springs, CO and Steamboat Springs, CO, as well as the Vail/Aspen area - and as far west as Salt Lake City, Utah.

                          2 Weeks ago I hiked in the foothills about 15 miles north of Salt Lake City, Utah with the purpose in mind of determining whether or not the Kern River Pipeline (which runs through the high foothills in that area) was the source or in any way affecting the amplitude of the hum. I'm aware of a trail that crosses directly over the pipeline itself. You can stand right on the pipeline at one point. Using foam earplugs (the type I use target shooting with about 25db attenuation of outside noise) are perfect for allowing the hum to come through loud and clear, as they nearly eliminate all other outside noises EXCEPT the hum itself). My "hike" experiment was that the hum seemed to be roughly the same amplitude whether I was standing on the pipeline or miles and miles away from it. Sounds exactly likes it sounds in Denver, 500 or so miles away.

                          The only difference in my perception of the hum between the Denver and Salt Lake City locations, is that it definitely seems to be coming from the west in Denver versus no perception of directionality at ALL in Salt Lake City, This, however, is a common characteristic of low-frequency sounds in general. You can place the "woofer" unit of your stereo system anywhere in the room and it's difficult to pinpoint its location using your ears alone.

                          The amplitude of the hum is so low that it's nearly impossible to record - even with professional digital recording gear. However, if one uses a STEREO microphone of extremely high sensitivity, a serious mic pre-amp and a decent digital recorder, one can verify the "in-person" experience of the frequency heard (again, in my case, it's exactly 34.5hz) by digitally manipulating the resulting recordings and speeding them up by multiples of the original recording speed. For example, digitally doubling the playback speed of the recording (easily done on most semi-pro or pro audio editing software) results (in my experiments) which a frequency of 69hz (34.5 x 2)  clearly identifiable during playback.

                          One can carry a frequency generator in the form of an iphone app which allows one to compare the hum being heard with a known reference source. I have experienced the hum in many, many places and have definitely "sensed" it coming from the earth - not from above - and it has invariably been at exactly 34.5 regardless of location.

                          Hope my experiences help you - or others - identify the source.

                          Yours,

                          Kevin


                          From: Mark Jordan <zorbasci@...>
                          To: "humforum@yahoogroups.com" <humforum@yahoogroups.com>
                          Sent: Sunday, November 4, 2012 9:19 AM
                          Subject: HUM_FORUM: Doppler Effect Possibility

                           
                          Hi to all,

                          I have another question. Please respond as every detail is important.

                          When you perceive the hum, do you feel that the noise is possibly a constant stream propagating from one direction to another or do you perceive that the noise is somewhere in the distance emanating from a single point?

                          If you perceive that the sound is coming from a specific direction, does this change when you turn your back towards the perceived sound? If from a specific direction, does the sound change as you rotate your body or head in a slow circle?

                          Do any of you perceive the noise as coming from all directions or from above?

                          When traveling in a vehicle of any type, do you perceive any differences in the hum?

                          Do you perceive any type of echo effect in the hum?

                          When the hum is really bad, do you have the sensation that time is dragging or do you feel like time "flies" or passes by faster?. In other words, do your days seem to go by faster or slower during extreme periods?

                          Do you ever experience missing time or lost time?


                          Mark S. Jordan






                          Reply via web post Reply to sender Reply


                        • Copsne
                          I have the reports supporting th points in, so far, 17 pdf files. Sent from Steve s iPhone and I appologize for typo s
                          Message 12 of 16 , Nov 9, 2012
                          • 0 Attachment
                            I have the reports supporting th points in, so far, 17 pdf files. 

                            Sent from Steve's iPhone and I appologize for typo's

                            On Nov 8, 2012, at 4:23 PM, Kevin Hawthorne <skybluepony@...> wrote:

                             


                            I just studied the map... and I find it very interesting.  Tempted to drive over to central Idaho to see if the hum disappears...

                            =kevin=


                            From: Copsne <c_o_p_s_ne@...>
                            To: "humforum@yahoogroups.com" <humforum@yahoogroups.com>
                            Sent: Tuesday, November 6, 2012 4:48 PM
                            Subject: Re: HUM_FORUM: Doppler Effect Possibility

                             
                            Check mymap in the files section. You are one of the points

                            Sent from Steve's iPhone and I appologize for typo's

                            On Nov 5, 2012, at 11:12 AM, Kevin Hawthorne <skybluepony@...> wrote:

                             
                            Mark -

                            As I professional sound engineer, one of my "habits" is to walk into a room or building and pinpoint offending noises - the type which are usually imperceptible to others. On a movie shoot, a refrigerator running in the next room, or an air conditioning system running on the rooftop isn't even on the crew's radar screens until everybody shuts up and the cameras start rolling - at which point the slight hum ruins the resulting film or video. 

                            Most of my experiences with the hum occur in my own home about 40 mile south of Denver, CO. This throbbing, low-frequency, extremely low-amplitude wave is definitely EXTERNAL as opposed to the "in your head" sensation of, say, tinnitus (which I, like most people, have experienced occasionally).

                            It can be perceived only in the "binaural" - i.e., only if one uses BOTH ears.

                            Although I am able to perceive the "hum" in/on ALL levels of my three-level home, it seems to be louder in my basement. My perception is that the hum comes from the earth itself, but uses structures as an "amplifier".

                            Although the sound "throbs" or "pulses" at 1 - 2 hz, the frequency itself seems to center at 34.5 hz regardless of geographic location. There are not many harmonics involved. The pulsing and throbbing also seem to be consistent regardless of geographic location. Amplitude varies greatly day by day / week by week, sometimes almost disappearing for days at a time, but never completely "zero."

                            I have experienced this sound (at exactly the same frequency) at various points around the Intermountain West, including the surrounding foothills in the Denver area, Glenwood Springs, CO and Steamboat Springs, CO, as well as the Vail/Aspen area - and as far west as Salt Lake City, Utah.

                            2 Weeks ago I hiked in the foothills about 15 miles north of Salt Lake City, Utah with the purpose in mind of determining whether or not the Kern River Pipeline (which runs through the high foothills in that area) was the source or in any way affecting the amplitude of the hum. I'm aware of a trail that crosses directly over the pipeline itself. You can stand right on the pipeline at one point. Using foam earplugs (the type I use target shooting with about 25db attenuation of outside noise) are perfect for allowing the hum to come through loud and clear, as they nearly eliminate all other outside noises EXCEPT the hum itself). My "hike" experiment was that the hum seemed to be roughly the same amplitude whether I was standing on the pipeline or miles and miles away from it. Sounds exactly likes it sounds in Denver, 500 or so miles away.

                            The only difference in my perception of the hum between the Denver and Salt Lake City locations, is that it definitely seems to be coming from the west in Denver versus no perception of directionality at ALL in Salt Lake City, This, however, is a common characteristic of low-frequency sounds in general. You can place the "woofer" unit of your stereo system anywhere in the room and it's difficult to pinpoint its location using your ears alone.

                            The amplitude of the hum is so low that it's nearly impossible to record - even with professional digital recording gear. However, if one uses a STEREO microphone of extremely high sensitivity, a serious mic pre-amp and a decent digital recorder, one can verify the "in-person" experience of the frequency heard (again, in my case, it's exactly 34.5hz) by digitally manipulating the resulting recordings and speeding them up by multiples of the original recording speed. For example, digitally doubling the playback speed of the recording (easily done on most semi-pro or pro audio editing software) results (in my experiments) which a frequency of 69hz (34.5 x 2)  clearly identifiable during playback.

                            One can carry a frequency generator in the form of an iphone app which allows one to compare the hum being heard with a known reference source. I have experienced the hum in many, many places and have definitely "sensed" it coming from the earth - not from above - and it has invariably been at exactly 34.5 regardless of location.

                            Hope my experiences help you - or others - identify the source.

                            Yours,

                            Kevin


                            From: Mark Jordan <zorbasci@...>
                            To: "humforum@yahoogroups.com" <humforum@yahoogroups.com>
                            Sent: Sunday, November 4, 2012 9:19 AM
                            Subject: HUM_FORUM: Doppler Effect Possibility

                             
                            Hi to all,

                            I have another question. Please respond as every detail is important.

                            When you perceive the hum, do you feel that the noise is possibly a constant stream propagating from one direction to another or do you perceive that the noise is somewhere in the distance emanating from a single point?

                            If you perceive that the sound is coming from a specific direction, does this change when you turn your back towards the perceived sound? If from a specific direction, does the sound change as you rotate your body or head in a slow circle?

                            Do any of you perceive the noise as coming from all directions or from above?

                            When traveling in a vehicle of any type, do you perceive any differences in the hum?

                            Do you perceive any type of echo effect in the hum?

                            When the hum is really bad, do you have the sensation that time is dragging or do you feel like time "flies" or passes by faster?. In other words, do your days seem to go by faster or slower during extreme periods?

                            Do you ever experience missing time or lost time?


                            Mark S. Jordan
                          • soultheorem1111
                            Hello Mark, I m a first time poster, although I ve been hearing the hum since July of 2008. I live in the Seattle area and when I first heard the hum it was
                            Message 13 of 16 , Nov 10, 2012
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Hello Mark,
                              I'm a first time poster, although I've been hearing the hum since July of 2008.
                              I live in the Seattle area and when I first heard the hum it was mostly at night - although lately, I hear the sound rather infrequently at any time of the day or night. I 'ran sound' for music concerts for a number of years, so I am very sensitive to extraneous noises.
                              The first night heard the sound (around 2-3 in the morning) I thought a house-mate was listening to music and his subwoofer was turned on/up (a 'house rules' no-no that late!). The sound varied a little bit in frequency but there was virtually no attenuation (volume change). I asked him about it the next day and he said he was asleep and his audio system was off. We deduced that I might be hearing a possible 'ground-loop' emanating from his powered-subwoofer. The next night, he unplugged it, and - of course - the sound was still there. I spent a lot of time those first nights trying to pinpoint the location, to no avail. The only thing I noticed is that it was the loudest in two corners of the basement of the house. With that, I thought the sound might be coming from below ground (like tunnel/pipeline drilling, or something)
                              I heard the sound at night almost every night for the next few months. (Side-note: of all the earplugs I tried that summer, Mack's silicone ear-plugs did the best at lessening the volume of the hum.) I also had a fan in my room that obscured the sound nicely. Since then, I hear the sound less frequently than I used to - Thankfully.
                              What really spurred me to reply to your info request is that I heard the sound in my car for the first time last Thursday night. I parked my car, shut the engine off and was gathering some stuff to take up to my apartment and there it was! The weirdest part is that when I moved my head from side to side (a foot or so), the sound seemed to 'phase shift' - the sensation is hard to describe, but I have not experienced this phase anomaly anywhere else I've heard it! Sound has always been 'just there'. Perhaps this is the echo-effect you are referring to?
                              Also, possibly of note to you, a cold front was passing through the area that evening (I'm a weather-geek, so I've started noting what the weather is doing when I hear the hum - based on a question you asked in a previous post).
                              I don't perceive any time anomalies, but I do feel like my short-term memory has been 'a little off' lately - maybe I'm just getting old!
                              Bottom line: what I hear sometimes is a 50-60 hertz, steady hum, only inside structures. Interestingly, it doesn't seem like it's as loud as when I first started hearing it. Maybe I'm just used to it now...
                              Sorry, wasn't planning on typing this much!
                              Best regards,
                              Ben

                              --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, Mark Jordan <zorbasci@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Hi to all,
                              >
                              > I have another question. Please respond as every detail is important.
                              >
                              > When you perceive the hum, do you feel that the noise is possibly a constant stream propagating from one direction to another or do you perceive that the noise is somewhere in the distance emanating from a single point?
                              >
                              > If you perceive that the sound is coming from a specific direction, does this change when you turn your back towards the perceived sound?If from a specific direction, does the sound change as you rotate your body or head in a slow circle?
                              >
                              >
                              > Do any of you perceive the noise as coming from all directions or from above?
                              >
                              > When traveling in a vehicle of any type, do you perceive any differences in the hum?
                              >
                              > Do you perceive any type of echo effect in the hum?
                              >
                              > When the hum is really bad, do you have the sensation that time is dragging or do you feel like time "flies" or passes by faster?. In other words, do your days seem to go by faster or slower during extreme periods?
                              >
                              > Do you ever experience missing time or lost time?
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > Mark S. Jordan
                              > zorbasci@...
                              >
                            • Inspired Mac
                              Ben: My experience has been very similar to yours, and of most of the folks in the Group, with a few differences. First, the phenomenon is heard by 3 of 4
                              Message 14 of 16 , Nov 15, 2012
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Ben:

                                My experience has been very similar to yours, and of most of the folks in the Group, with a few differences. First, the phenomenon is heard by 3 of 4 people in my home. The sound is loudest inside my home, though it can be heard outside as well, depending on the presence of white noise. For the first time last week, I heard it at a location other than my home. I was about 1 Km north attending a dental appointment, sitting alone in the chair in one of those tiny offices waiting for the dentist. I've also noticed that, in addition to the amplified nature of the sound in two corners of my basement, the sound is loudest when I stand in front of any window on the north-facing side of my home.


                                From: soultheorem1111 <soul_theorem@...>
                                To: humforum@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Saturday, November 10, 2012 11:31:21 PM
                                Subject: HUM_FORUM: Re: Doppler Effect Possibility

                                 

                                Hello Mark,
                                I'm a first time poster, although I've been hearing the hum since July of 2008.
                                I live in the Seattle area and when I first heard the hum it was mostly at night - although lately, I hear the sound rather infrequently at any time of the day or night. I 'ran sound' for music concerts for a number of years, so I am very sensitive to extraneous noises.
                                The first night heard the sound (around 2-3 in the morning) I thought a house-mate was listening to music and his subwoofer was turned on/up (a 'house rules' no-no that late!). The sound varied a little bit in frequency but there was virtually no attenuation (volume change). I asked him about it the next day and he said he was asleep and his audio system was off. We deduced that I might be hearing a possible 'ground-loop' emanating from his powered-subwoofer. The next night, he unplugged it, and - of course - the sound was still there. I spent a lot of time those first nights trying to pinpoint the location, to no avail. The only thing I noticed is that it was the loudest in two corners of the basement of the house. With that, I thought the sound might be coming from below ground (like tunnel/pipeline drilling, or something)
                                I heard the sound at night almost every night for the next few months. (Side-note: of all the earplugs I tried that summer, Mack's silicone ear-plugs did the best at lessening the volume of the hum.) I also had a fan in my room that obscured the sound nicely. Since then, I hear the sound less frequently than I used to - Thankfully.
                                What really spurred me to reply to your info request is that I heard the sound in my car for the first time last Thursday night. I parked my car, shut the engine off and was gathering some stuff to take up to my apartment and there it was! The weirdest part is that when I moved my head from side to side (a foot or so), the sound seemed to 'phase shift' - the sensation is hard to describe, but I have not experienced this phase anomaly anywhere else I've heard it! Sound has always been 'just there'. Perhaps this is the echo-effect you are referring to?
                                Also, possibly of note to you, a cold front was passing through the area that evening (I'm a weather-geek, so I've started noting what the weather is doing when I hear the hum - based on a question you asked in a previous post).
                                I don't perceive any time anomalies, but I do feel like my short-term memory has been 'a little off' lately - maybe I'm just getting old!
                                Bottom line: what I hear sometimes is a 50-60 hertz, steady hum, only inside structures. Interestingly, it doesn't seem like it's as loud as when I first started hearing it. Maybe I'm just used to it now...
                                Sorry, wasn't planning on typing this much!
                                Best regards,
                                Ben

                                --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, Mark Jordan <zorbasci@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Hi to all,
                                >
                                > I have another question. Please respond as every detail is important.
                                >
                                > When you perceive the hum, do you feel that the noise is possibly a constant stream propagating from one direction to another or do you perceive that the noise is somewhere in the distance emanating from a single point?
                                >
                                > If you perceive that the sound is coming from a specific direction, does this change when you turn your back towards the perceived sound?If from a specific direction, does the sound change as you rotate your body or head in a slow circle?
                                >
                                >
                                > Do any of you perceive the noise as coming from all directions or from above?
                                >
                                > When traveling in a vehicle of any type, do you perceive any differences in the hum?
                                >
                                > Do you perceive any type of echo effect in the hum?
                                >
                                > When the hum is really bad, do you have the sensation that time is dragging or do you feel like time "flies" or passes by faster?. In other words, do your days seem to go by faster or slower during extreme periods?
                                >
                                > Do you ever experience missing time or lost time?
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > Mark S. Jordan
                                > zorbasci@...
                                >



                              • humhaukka
                                ... Kevin could you do FFT analysis individually from both channels of your hum recording and present it here in some format,I am specially intrested in 5-15
                                Message 15 of 16 , Jan 1, 2013
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, Kevin Hawthorne <skybluepony@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Mark -
                                  >
                                  > As I professional sound engineer, one of my "habits" is to walk into a room or building and pinpoint offending noises - the type which are usually imperceptible to others. On a movie shoot, a refrigerator running in the next room, or an air conditioning system running on the rooftop isn't even on the crew's radar screens until everybody shuts up and the cameras start rolling - at which point the slight hum ruins the resulting film or video. 
                                  >
                                  > Most of my experiences with the hum occur in my own home about 40 mile south of Denver, CO. This throbbing, low-frequency, extremely low-amplitude wave is definitely EXTERNAL as opposed to the "in your head" sensation of, say, tinnitus (which I, like most people, have experienced occasionally).
                                  >
                                  > It can be perceived only in the "binaural" - i.e., only if one uses BOTH ears.
                                  >
                                  > Although I am able to perceive the "hum" in/on ALL levels of my three-level home, it seems to be louder in my basement. My perception is that the hum comes from the earth itself, but uses structures as an "amplifier".
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > Although the sound "throbs" or "pulses" at 1 - 2 hz, the frequency itself seems to center at 34.5 hz regardless of geographic location. There are not many harmonics involved. The pulsing and throbbing also seem to be consistent regardless of geographic location. Amplitude varies greatly day by day / week by week, sometimes almost disappearing for days at a time, but never completely "zero."
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > I have experienced this sound (at exactly the same frequency) at various points around the Intermountain West, including the surrounding foothills in the Denver area, Glenwood Springs, CO and Steamboat Springs, CO, as well as the Vail/Aspen area - and as far west as Salt Lake City, Utah.
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > 2 Weeks ago I hiked in the foothills about 15 miles north of Salt Lake City, Utah with the purpose in mind of determining whether or not the Kern River Pipeline (which runs through the high foothills in that area) was the source or in any way affecting the amplitude of the hum. I'm aware of a trail that crosses directly over the pipeline itself. You can stand right on the pipeline at one point. Using foam earplugs (the type I use target shooting with about 25db attenuation of outside noise) are perfect for allowing the hum to come through loud and clear, as they nearly eliminate all other outside noises EXCEPT the hum itself). My "hike" experiment was that the hum seemed to be roughly the same amplitude whether I was standing on the pipeline or miles and miles away from it. Sounds exactly likes it sounds in Denver, 500 or so miles away.
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > The only difference in my perception of the hum between the Denver and Salt Lake City locations, is that it definitely seems to be coming from the west in Denver versus no perception of directionality at ALL in Salt Lake City, This, however, is a common characteristic of low-frequency sounds in general. You can place the "woofer" unit of your stereo system anywhere in the room and it's difficult to pinpoint its location using your ears alone.
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > The amplitude of the hum is so low that it's nearly impossible to record - even with professional digital recording gear. However, if one uses a STEREO microphone of extremely high sensitivity, a serious mic pre-amp and a decent digital recorder, one can verify the "in-person" experience of the frequency heard (again, in my case, it's exactly 34.5hz) by digitally manipulating the resulting recordings and speeding them up by multiples of the original recording speed. For example, digitally doubling the playback speed of the recording (easily done on most semi-pro or pro audio editing software) results (in my experiments) which a frequency of 69hz (34.5 x 2)  clearly identifiable during playback.
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > One can carry a frequency generator in the form of an iphone app which allows one to compare the hum being heard with a known reference source. I have experienced the hum in many, many places and have definitely "sensed" it coming from the earth - not from above - and it has invariably been at exactly 34.5 regardless of location.
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > Hope my experiences help you - or others - identify the source.
                                  >
                                  > Yours,
                                  >
                                  > Kevin
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  Kevin could you do FFT analysis individually from both channels of your hum recording and present it here in some format,I am specially intrested in 5-15 Khz range because I think the basic hum carrier is there

                                  Jyrki

                                  Southern Finland
                                • gerfmarquezblackmetal
                                  http://www.haarp.alaska.edu/cgi-bin/scmag/disp-scmag.cgi check this out this is a monitor for HAARP, you can check monitor activity readings from 0 hz to 5 hz
                                  Message 16 of 16 , Jan 1, 2013
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    http://www.haarp.alaska.edu/cgi-bin/scmag/disp-scmag.cgi check this out this is a monitor for HAARP, you can check monitor activity readings from 0 hz to 5 hz by date so you should be able to tell if it realtes to the thing you are talking about.

                                    --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, "humhaukka" <jyrki@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, Kevin Hawthorne <skybluepony@> wrote:
                                    > >
                                    > > Mark -
                                    > >
                                    > > As I professional sound engineer, one of my "habits" is to walk into a room or building and pinpoint offending noises - the type which are usually imperceptible to others. On a movie shoot, a refrigerator running in the next room, or an air conditioning system running on the rooftop isn't even on the crew's radar screens until everybody shuts up and the cameras start rolling - at which point the slight hum ruins the resulting film or video. 
                                    > >
                                    > > Most of my experiences with the hum occur in my own home about 40 mile south of Denver, CO. This throbbing, low-frequency, extremely low-amplitude wave is definitely EXTERNAL as opposed to the "in your head" sensation of, say, tinnitus (which I, like most people, have experienced occasionally).
                                    > >
                                    > > It can be perceived only in the "binaural" - i.e., only if one uses BOTH ears.
                                    > >
                                    > > Although I am able to perceive the "hum" in/on ALL levels of my three-level home, it seems to be louder in my basement. My perception is that the hum comes from the earth itself, but uses structures as an "amplifier".
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > > Although the sound "throbs" or "pulses" at 1 - 2 hz, the frequency itself seems to center at 34.5 hz regardless of geographic location. There are not many harmonics involved. The pulsing and throbbing also seem to be consistent regardless of geographic location. Amplitude varies greatly day by day / week by week, sometimes almost disappearing for days at a time, but never completely "zero."
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > > I have experienced this sound (at exactly the same frequency) at various points around the Intermountain West, including the surrounding foothills in the Denver area, Glenwood Springs, CO and Steamboat Springs, CO, as well as the Vail/Aspen area - and as far west as Salt Lake City, Utah.
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > > 2 Weeks ago I hiked in the foothills about 15 miles north of Salt Lake City, Utah with the purpose in mind of determining whether or not the Kern River Pipeline (which runs through the high foothills in that area) was the source or in any way affecting the amplitude of the hum. I'm aware of a trail that crosses directly over the pipeline itself. You can stand right on the pipeline at one point. Using foam earplugs (the type I use target shooting with about 25db attenuation of outside noise) are perfect for allowing the hum to come through loud and clear, as they nearly eliminate all other outside noises EXCEPT the hum itself). My "hike" experiment was that the hum seemed to be roughly the same amplitude whether I was standing on the pipeline or miles and miles away from it. Sounds exactly likes it sounds in Denver, 500 or so miles away.
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > > The only difference in my perception of the hum between the Denver and Salt Lake City locations, is that it definitely seems to be coming from the west in Denver versus no perception of directionality at ALL in Salt Lake City, This, however, is a common characteristic of low-frequency sounds in general. You can place the "woofer" unit of your stereo system anywhere in the room and it's difficult to pinpoint its location using your ears alone.
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                                    > > The amplitude of the hum is so low that it's nearly impossible to record - even with professional digital recording gear. However, if one uses a STEREO microphone of extremely high sensitivity, a serious mic pre-amp and a decent digital recorder, one can verify the "in-person" experience of the frequency heard (again, in my case, it's exactly 34.5hz) by digitally manipulating the resulting recordings and speeding them up by multiples of the original recording speed. For example, digitally doubling the playback speed of the recording (easily done on most semi-pro or pro audio editing software) results (in my experiments) which a frequency of 69hz (34.5 x 2)  clearly identifiable during playback.
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                                    > > One can carry a frequency generator in the form of an iphone app which allows one to compare the hum being heard with a known reference source. I have experienced the hum in many, many places and have definitely "sensed" it coming from the earth - not from above - and it has invariably been at exactly 34.5 regardless of location.
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                                    > > Hope my experiences help you - or others - identify the source.
                                    > >
                                    > > Yours,
                                    > >
                                    > > Kevin
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                                    > Kevin could you do FFT analysis individually from both channels of your hum recording and present it here in some format,I am specially intrested in 5-15 Khz range because I think the basic hum carrier is there
                                    >
                                    > Jyrki
                                    >
                                    > Southern Finland
                                    >
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