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Re: RTA analyzer

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  • bluefalcon8881
    Hi Maggie I need to find a no hum location then i shall compare and let you know Blue
    Message 1 of 7 , Aug 7, 2012
      Hi Maggie


      I need to find a no hum location then i shall compare and let you know

      Blue

      --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, "Margaret" <coatesmargaret@...> wrote:
      >
      > Interesting. What have been some of your findings? And do they appear
      > to relate to your perceptions of the hum? Maggie (Aus)
      > --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, "bluefalcon8881" <bluefalcon8881@>
      > wrote:
      > >
      > > Has anyone tried the free app "rta analyzer" on the Android phones?
      > > This is a sound analyzer and is extremely sensitive
      > > I have used it for a while now and it is strange that in the dead of
      > night it displays a linear ramp starting from 64hz to 16khz on the
      > horizontal scale and minus 100db to minus 60db on the vertical scale
      > > If you have an Android phone download it as its free and see if you
      > get similar results
      > >
      > > Blue
      > >
      >
    • lidia1313
      Hi, Bluefalcon, You may also want to try locating the Hum through a transistor radio... Here is the link on how to apply it.
      Message 2 of 7 , Aug 7, 2012
        Hi, Bluefalcon,

        You may also want to try locating the Hum through a transistor radio... Here is the link on how to apply it.
        http://www.btinternet.com/~gmbarnes/Transistor.htm
        I hope you can get a Hum free location soon. Please let us know.

        Regards,
        Lidia

        --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, "bluefalcon8881" <bluefalcon8881@...> wrote:
        >
        > Has anyone tried the free app "rta analyzer" on the Android phones?
        > This is a sound analyzer and is extremely sensitive
        > I have used it for a while now and it is strange that in the dead of night it displays a linear ramp starting from 64hz to 16khz on the horizontal scale and minus 100db to minus 60db on the vertical scale
        > If you have an Android phone download it as its free and see if you get similar results
        >
        > Blue
        >
      • Copsne
        So far of places I go east of the Mississippi river only Marco Island Fl and Block Island RI in the US. I think Adieondack area of Ny around Saratoga Springs.
        Message 3 of 7 , Aug 7, 2012
          So far of places I go east of the Mississippi river only Marco Island Fl and Block Island RI in the US. I think Adieondack area of Ny around Saratoga Springs. But I have to revisit to assure that. 

          I will tell you using FFT low hum intensity days have a much lower flucuation of max/ min variations at all frequencies. The mean ave also seems less , although that could be error in testing

          Sent from Steve's iPhone and I appologize for typo's

          On Aug 7, 2012, at 4:58 AM, "bluefalcon8881" <bluefalcon8881@...> wrote:

           


          Hi Maggie

          I need to find a no hum location then i shall compare and let you know

          Blue

          --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, "Margaret" <coatesmargaret@...> wrote:
          >
          > Interesting. What have been some of your findings? And do they appear
          > to relate to your perceptions of the hum? Maggie (Aus)
          > --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, "bluefalcon8881" <bluefalcon8881@>
          > wrote:
          > >
          > > Has anyone tried the free app "rta analyzer" on the Android phones?
          > > This is a sound analyzer and is extremely sensitive
          > > I have used it for a while now and it is strange that in the dead of
          > night it displays a linear ramp starting from 64hz to 16khz on the
          > horizontal scale and minus 100db to minus 60db on the vertical scale
          > > If you have an Android phone download it as its free and see if you
          > get similar results
          > >
          > > Blue
          > >
          >

          =
        • Mark Jordan
          Hi to all,   Unfortunately, while one can use portable radios to find electromagnetic pollution from appliances and other electrical devices, there are other
          Message 4 of 7 , Aug 8, 2012
            Hi to all,
             
            Unfortunately, while one can use portable radios to find electromagnetic pollution from appliances and other electrical devices, there are other patterns that would interfere with detecting sources of electrical hums. The AM band is particularly useful in detecting electromagnetic fields around appliances.
             
            For many years I used off-tuned radios to study patterns in nature. I created a demonstration plot in a deep forest area far from any power lines or other man-made structures. I mapped out grids where the radio signal was nullified or lost completely. These existed in patterns of lines that align with the earth's magnetic field. When you tune the radio a little off station and walk slowly north/south or east/west, the signal will be lost completely when you cross one of the grid lines of the Hartmann Grid. Another diagonal pattern has different dimensions and that is the Curry Grid. These are easily found with a Google Search. While the source of these grids is unknown, the Hartmann Grid is easily shown to align with the earth's magnetic field. 
             
            I allowed local Audubon officials to tour my demonstration plot. I demonstrated that birds and other animals built their nests exactly where the lines cross each other. Only when the internet advanced far enough was I able to determine that the lines were actually previously discovered by Dr. Earnst Hartmann. Another doctor, Von Pohl, had previously demonstrated that lightning interacts with trees that are on these intersections. I also discovered that independently. I have no knowledge of how they detected these fields.
             
            Radios will definitely change in behavior or signal reception at certain points under power lines. This would not be a surprise.
             
            It is advised that one must be careful when using off-tuned radio signals to study any type of electrical or electromagnetic patterns.
             
            Mark S. Jordan

            From: lidia1313 <lidia1313@...>
            To: humforum@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Tuesday, August 7, 2012 5:20 AM
            Subject: HUM_FORUM: Re: RTA analyzer

             
            Hi, Bluefalcon,

            You may also want to try locating the Hum through a transistor radio... Here is the link on how to apply it.
            http://www.btinternet.com/~gmbarnes/Transistor.htm
            I hope you can get a Hum free location soon. Please let us know.

            Regards,
            Lidia

            --- In mailto:humforum%40yahoogroups.com, "bluefalcon8881" <bluefalcon8881@...> wrote:
            >
            > Has anyone tried the free app "rta analyzer" on the Android phones?
            > This is a sound analyzer and is extremely sensitive
            > I have used it for a while now and it is strange that in the dead of night it displays a linear ramp starting from 64hz to 16khz on the horizontal scale and minus 100db to minus 60db on the vertical scale
            > If you have an Android phone download it as its free and see if you get similar results
            >
            > Blue
            >



          • Steve Kohlhase
            Very interesting.  Will look into. ________________________________ From: Mark Jordan To: humforum@yahoogroups.com
            Message 5 of 7 , Aug 8, 2012
              Very interesting.  Will look into.

              From: Mark Jordan <zorbasci@...>
              To: "humforum@yahoogroups.com" <humforum@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Wednesday, August 8, 2012 6:17 AM
              Subject: Re: HUM_FORUM: Re: RTA analyzer/Radio Detection

               
              Hi to all,
               
              Unfortunately, while one can use portable radios to find electromagnetic pollution from appliances and other electrical devices, there are other patterns that would interfere with detecting sources of electrical hums. The AM band is particularly useful in detecting electromagnetic fields around appliances.
               
              For many years I used off-tuned radios to study patterns in nature. I created a demonstration plot in a deep forest area far from any power lines or other man-made structures. I mapped out grids where the radio signal was nullified or lost completely. These existed in patterns of lines that align with the earth's magnetic field. When you tune the radio a little off station and walk slowly north/south or east/west, the signal will be lost completely when you cross one of the grid lines of the Hartmann Grid. Another diagonal pattern has different dimensions and that is the Curry Grid. These are easily found with a Google Search. While the source of these grids is unknown, the Hartmann Grid is easily shown to align with the earth's magnetic field. 
               
              I allowed local Audubon officials to tour my demonstration plot. I demonstrated that birds and other animals built their nests exactly where the lines cross each other. Only when the internet advanced far enough was I able to determine that the lines were actually previously discovered by Dr. Earnst Hartmann. Another doctor, Von Pohl, had previously demonstrated that lightning interacts with trees that are on these intersections. I also discovered that independently. I have no knowledge of how they detected these fields.
               
              Radios will definitely change in behavior or signal reception at certain points under power lines. This would not be a surprise.
               
              It is advised that one must be careful when using off-tuned radio signals to study any type of electrical or electromagnetic patterns.
               
              Mark S. Jordan

              From: lidia1313 <lidia1313@...>
              To: humforum@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Tuesday, August 7, 2012 5:20 AM
              Subject: HUM_FORUM: Re: RTA analyzer

               
              Hi, Bluefalcon,

              You may also want to try locating the Hum through a transistor radio... Here is the link on how to apply it.
              http://www.btinternet.com/~gmbarnes/Transistor.htm
              I hope you can get a Hum free location soon. Please let us know.

              Regards,
              Lidia

              --- In mailto:humforum%40yahoogroups.com, "bluefalcon8881" <bluefalcon8881@...> wrote:
              >
              > Has anyone tried the free app "rta analyzer" on the Android phones?
              > This is a sound analyzer and is extremely sensitive
              > I have used it for a while now and it is strange that in the dead of night it displays a linear ramp starting from 64hz to 16khz on the horizontal scale and minus 100db to minus 60db on the vertical scale
              > If you have an Android phone download it as its free and see if you get similar results
              >
              > Blue
              >





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