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Re: HUM_FORUM: Re: Best Hum recording (not an audio simulation)

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  • Copsne
    Tens of thousands of horsepower pushing high pressure gas through steel lines up to 48 inch in dia will do it! Go to a pipe yard and scream into a large dia
    Message 1 of 13 , Jul 7, 2012
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      Tens of thousands of horsepower pushing high pressure gas through steel lines up to 48 inch in dia will do it!  Go to a pipe yard and scream into a large dia steel pipe. It's erie. 

      Sent from Steve's iPhone and I appologize for typo's

      On Jul 7, 2012, at 1:24 PM, Kevin Hawthorne <skybluepony@...> wrote:

       

      It's interesting that this particular frequency (34.5) shows up in several videos but hasn't particularly gained any attention. To be objective, the sound in the particular video we're discussing could be caused by a fan or a motor anything, for that matter. Even the poster of the video was trying to focus our attention on another frequency - or frequencies. It caught my attention because that it what I'm hearing, as well as the poor folks in Windsor who are being driven out of their homes by it.

      As for the trumpet sound you've heard, I have only heard it on videos posted by others. Having spent years creating sound effects for movies, I would say the sound is created by a massive mechanical expulsion of air from a large space (most likely tubular). The amount of air and the spaces involved, and the force to push that much gas outward would have to be massive to create a sound that loud and prolonged. These are only hunches based on my experience as a sound effect "creator". 

      Several "hum" videos on YouTube have this "trumpet" sound. It is similar in every instance, but each has its own personality. Either somebody is very good at creating ungodly sound effects and is overlaying them onto their video creations, or there are massive chambers full of some sort of air or gas that are being forced to expel gas by some unknown force.

      Frankly, listening to the trumpets / groaning / videos sends chills down my spine.....

      The thought has crossed my mind several times that huge tunnels are being ventilated somewhere....??? But the horsepower required to move that much air would be almost beyond imagination.




      From: veiled.mystery <veiled.mystery@...>
      To: humforum@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Saturday, July 7, 2012 2:31 AM
      Subject: HUM_FORUM: Re: Best Hum recording (not an audio simulation)

       
      Hi Kevin,
      Yes i agree, take away the white noise and that is exactly what i am hearing too.

      --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, Kevin Hawthorne <skybluepony@...> wrote:
      >
      > The audio guy here again....
      >
      > re: the Youtube video just mentioned:
      >
      > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ldQRMto1kIU
      >
      > As I have mentioned in one or more of my previous posts to this forum, the audible frequency I hear near Denver is precisely 34.5 hz. I have made recordings of the sound on several occasions. The resulting recordings are of extremely low amplitude, and therefore inconclusive unless you've been hearing the sound "live" - i.e., through your own two ears, as well.
      >
      >
      > I have further determined the exact frequency I am experiencing by doubling, tripling, or quadrupling the speed of my recordings, "matching" the frequency using a tone generator and dividing by 2, 3 or 4 respectively. The reason I do this extra step is because frequencies below, say 40 or 50 hz are difficult, but not impossible, to identify, but the doubling, tripling or quadrupling of the frequency allows a very precise identification of original frequency.
      >
      > The sound (besides all the "white" noise in the video) I can distinctly hear in this Youtube video precisely matches a tone generator set to 34.5 hz. The poster of the video has visually highlighted a frequency of 100 hz, but if ANY listener familiar with the basics of music or audio cares to "overlay" an artificially-generated tone of 34.5 hz while simultaneously listening to the Youtube video, the pulsating base frequency of 34.5 can clearly be identified. It seems to be the "root" frequency of audio when played on any decent set of stereo speakers, or while listening through headphones.
      >
      >
      > Some of the other videos on Youtube that highlight this pulsating 34.5 hz frequency are:
      >
      > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mok79ubplDk
      >
      > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LtSDMMDOjKA&feature=related
      >



    • Kevin Hawthorne
      Okay... so you re aware of a possible mechanism. The trumpet sounds I ve heard on video and the ones that veiled mystery is referring to (I believe) are the
      Message 2 of 13 , Jul 7, 2012
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        Okay... so you're aware of a possible mechanism. The trumpet sounds I've heard on video and the ones that veiled mystery is referring to (I believe) are the ones the sound like they are being "vented" into the open atmosphere. The uncontrolled pitch has the sound of gas or air traveling a distance within a containing structure, then suddenly finding NO resistance, resulting in the characteristic - for lack of a better term - "spastic" sound - like a huge monster exhaling in its death throes.

        Can you think of places where this gas supply system "vents" into the atmosphere?


        From: Copsne <c_o_p_s_ne@...>
        To: "humforum@yahoogroups.com" <humforum@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Saturday, July 7, 2012 4:17 PM
        Subject: Re: HUM_FORUM: Re: Best Hum recording (not an audio simulation)

         
        Tens of thousands of horsepower pushing high pressure gas through steel lines up to 48 inch in dia will do it!  Go to a pipe yard and scream into a large dia steel pipe. It's erie. 

        Sent from Steve's iPhone and I appologize for typo's

        On Jul 7, 2012, at 1:24 PM, Kevin Hawthorne <skybluepony@...> wrote:

         
        It's interesting that this particular frequency (34.5) shows up in several videos but hasn't particularly gained any attention. To be objective, the sound in the particular video we're discussing could be caused by a fan or a motor anything, for that matter. Even the poster of the video was trying to focus our attention on another frequency - or frequencies. It caught my attention because that it what I'm hearing, as well as the poor folks in Windsor who are being driven out of their homes by it.

        As for the trumpet sound you've heard, I have only heard it on videos posted by others. Having spent years creating sound effects for movies, I would say the sound is created by a massive mechanical expulsion of air from a large space (most likely tubular). The amount of air and the spaces involved, and the force to push that much gas outward would have to be massive to create a sound that loud and prolonged. These are only hunches based on my experience as a sound effect "creator". 

        Several "hum" videos on YouTube have this "trumpet" sound. It is similar in every instance, but each has its own personality. Either somebody is very good at creating ungodly sound effects and is overlaying them onto their video creations, or there are massive chambers full of some sort of air or gas that are being forced to expel gas by some unknown force.

        Frankly, listening to the trumpets / groaning / videos sends chills down my spine.....

        The thought has crossed my mind several times that huge tunnels are being ventilated somewhere....??? But the horsepower required to move that much air would be almost beyond imagination.




        From: veiled.mystery <veiled.mystery@...>
        To: humforum@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Saturday, July 7, 2012 2:31 AM
        Subject: HUM_FORUM: Re: Best Hum recording (not an audio simulation)

         
        Hi Kevin,
        Yes i agree, take away the white noise and that is exactly what i am hearing too.

        --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, Kevin Hawthorne <skybluepony@...> wrote:
        >
        > The audio guy here again....
        >
        > re: the Youtube video just mentioned:
        >
        > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ldQRMto1kIU
        >
        > As I have mentioned in one or more of my previous posts to this forum, the audible frequency I hear near Denver is precisely 34.5 hz. I have made recordings of the sound on several occasions. The resulting recordings are of extremely low amplitude, and therefore inconclusive unless you've been hearing the sound "live" - i.e., through your own two ears, as well.
        >
        >
        > I have further determined the exact frequency I am experiencing by doubling, tripling, or quadrupling the speed of my recordings, "matching" the frequency using a tone generator and dividing by 2, 3 or 4 respectively. The reason I do this extra step is because frequencies below, say 40 or 50 hz are difficult, but not impossible, to identify, but the doubling, tripling or quadrupling of the frequency allows a very precise identification of original frequency.
        >
        > The sound (besides all the "white" noise in the video) I can distinctly hear in this Youtube video precisely matches a tone generator set to 34.5 hz. The poster of the video has visually highlighted a frequency of 100 hz, but if ANY listener familiar with the basics of music or audio cares to "overlay" an artificially-generated tone of 34.5 hz while simultaneously listening to the Youtube video, the pulsating base frequency of 34.5 can clearly be identified. It seems to be the "root" frequency of audio when played on any decent set of stereo speakers, or while listening through headphones.
        >
        >
        > Some of the other videos on Youtube that highlight this pulsating 34.5 hz frequency are:
        >
        > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mok79ubplDk
        >
        > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LtSDMMDOjKA&feature=related
        >





      • Soozie
        I agree with you Kevin! It sounds very similar to blowing across the top of a bottle, but also seems to have a clanging, creaking, or scraping metal sound
        Message 3 of 13 , Jul 8, 2012
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          I agree with you Kevin! It sounds very similar to blowing across the top of a bottle, but also seems to have a clanging, creaking, or scraping metal sound woven in. I would hate to be near by it's orgination point! It begs to ask why does no one know where this is coming from when it it so huge?
           
          Suzie

          From: Kevin Hawthorne <skybluepony@...>
          To: "humforum@yahoogroups.com" <humforum@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Saturday, July 7, 2012 6:34 PM
          Subject: Re: HUM_FORUM: Re: Best Hum recording (not an audio simulation)

           
          Okay... so you're aware of a possible mechanism. The trumpet sounds I've heard on video and the ones that veiled mystery is referring to (I believe) are the ones the sound like they are being "vented" into the open atmosphere. The uncontrolled pitch has the sound of gas or air traveling a distance within a containing structure, then suddenly finding NO resistance, resulting in the characteristic - for lack of a better term - "spastic" sound - like a huge monster exhaling in its death throes.

          Can you think of places where this gas supply system "vents" into the atmosphere?

          From: Copsne <c_o_p_s_ne@...>
          To: "humforum@yahoogroups.com" <humforum@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Saturday, July 7, 2012 4:17 PM
          Subject: Re: HUM_FORUM: Re: Best Hum recording (not an audio simulation)

           
          Tens of thousands of horsepower pushing high pressure gas through steel lines up to 48 inch in dia will do it!  Go to a pipe yard and scream into a large dia steel pipe. It's erie. 

          Sent from Steve's iPhone and I appologize for typo's

          On Jul 7, 2012, at 1:24 PM, Kevin Hawthorne <skybluepony@...> wrote:

           
          It's interesting that this particular frequency (34.5) shows up in several videos but hasn't particularly gained any attention. To be objective, the sound in the particular video we're discussing could be caused by a fan or a motor anything, for that matter. Even the poster of the video was trying to focus our attention on another frequency - or frequencies. It caught my attention because that it what I'm hearing, as well as the poor folks in Windsor who are being driven out of their homes by it.

          As for the trumpet sound you've heard, I have only heard it on videos posted by others. Having spent years creating sound effects for movies, I would say the sound is created by a massive mechanical expulsion of air from a large space (most likely tubular). The amount of air and the spaces involved, and the force to push that much gas outward would have to be massive to create a sound that loud and prolonged. These are only hunches based on my experience as a sound effect "creator". 

          Several "hum" videos on YouTube have this "trumpet" sound. It is similar in every instance, but each has its own personality. Either somebody is very good at creating ungodly sound effects and is overlaying them onto their video creations, or there are massive chambers full of some sort of air or gas that are being forced to expel gas by some unknown force.

          Frankly, listening to the trumpets / groaning / videos sends chills down my spine.....

          The thought has crossed my mind several times that huge tunnels are being ventilated somewhere....??? But the horsepower required to move that much air would be almost beyond imagination.



          From: veiled.mystery <veiled.mystery@...>
          To: humforum@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Saturday, July 7, 2012 2:31 AM
          Subject: HUM_FORUM: Re: Best Hum recording (not an audio simulation)

           
          Hi Kevin,
          Yes i agree, take away the white noise and that is exactly what i am hearing too.

          --- In mailto:humforum%40yahoogroups.com, Kevin Hawthorne <skybluepony@...> wrote:
          >
          > The audio guy here again....
          >
          > re: the Youtube video just mentioned:
          >
          > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ldQRMto1kIU
          >
          > As I have mentioned in one or more of my previous posts to this forum, the audible frequency I hear near Denver is precisely 34.5 hz. I have made recordings of the sound on several occasions. The resulting recordings are of extremely low amplitude, and therefore inconclusive unless you've been hearing the sound "live" - i.e., through your own two ears, as well.
          >
          >
          > I have further determined the exact frequency I am experiencing by doubling, tripling, or quadrupling the speed of my recordings, "matching" the frequency using a tone generator and dividing by 2, 3 or 4 respectively. The reason I do this extra step is because frequencies below, say 40 or 50 hz are difficult, but not impossible, to identify, but the doubling, tripling or quadrupling of the frequency allows a very precise identification of original frequency.
          >
          > The sound (besides all the "white" noise in the video) I can distinctly hear in this Youtube video precisely matches a tone generator set to 34.5 hz. The poster of the video has visually highlighted a frequency of 100 hz, but if ANY listener familiar with the basics of music or audio cares to "overlay" an artificially-generated tone of 34.5 hz while simultaneously listening to the Youtube video, the pulsating base frequency of 34.5 can clearly be identified. It seems to be the "root" frequency of audio when played on any decent set of stereo speakers, or while listening through headphones.
          >
          >
          > Some of the other videos on Youtube that highlight this pulsating 34.5 hz frequency are:
          >
          > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mok79ubplDk
          >
          > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LtSDMMDOjKA&feature=related
          >







        • Soozie
          How in the hell can yelling into a gas pipe compare to this large of a sound? What conclusions can one come to when making such a poor comarative? I can t
          Message 4 of 13 , Jul 8, 2012
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            How in the hell can yelling into a gas pipe compare to this large of a sound? What conclusions can one come to when making such a poor comarative?
            I can't stretch my imagination that far.
            Curious,
            Suzie
             

            From: Copsne <c_o_p_s_ne@...>
            To: "humforum@yahoogroups.com" <humforum@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Saturday, July 7, 2012 5:17 PM
            Subject: Re: HUM_FORUM: Re: Best Hum recording (not an audio simulation)

             
            Tens of thousands of horsepower pushing high pressure gas through steel lines up to 48 inch in dia will do it!  Go to a pipe yard and scream into a large dia steel pipe. It's erie. 

            Sent from Steve's iPhone and I appologize for typo's

            On Jul 7, 2012, at 1:24 PM, Kevin Hawthorne <skybluepony@...> wrote:

             
            It's interesting that this particular frequency (34.5) shows up in several videos but hasn't particularly gained any attention. To be objective, the sound in the particular video we're discussing could be caused by a fan or a motor anything, for that matter. Even the poster of the video was trying to focus our attention on another frequency - or frequencies. It caught my attention because that it what I'm hearing, as well as the poor folks in Windsor who are being driven out of their homes by it.

            As for the trumpet sound you've heard, I have only heard it on videos posted by others. Having spent years creating sound effects for movies, I would say the sound is created by a massive mechanical expulsion of air from a large space (most likely tubular). The amount of air and the spaces involved, and the force to push that much gas outward would have to be massive to create a sound that loud and prolonged. These are only hunches based on my experience as a sound effect "creator". 

            Several "hum" videos on YouTube have this "trumpet" sound. It is similar in every instance, but each has its own personality. Either somebody is very good at creating ungodly sound effects and is overlaying them onto their video creations, or there are massive chambers full of some sort of air or gas that are being forced to expel gas by some unknown force.

            Frankly, listening to the trumpets / groaning / videos sends chills down my spine.....

            The thought has crossed my mind several times that huge tunnels are being ventilated somewhere....??? But the horsepower required to move that much air would be almost beyond imagination.



            From: veiled.mystery <veiled.mystery@...>
            To: humforum@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Saturday, July 7, 2012 2:31 AM
            Subject: HUM_FORUM: Re: Best Hum recording (not an audio simulation)

             
            Hi Kevin,
            Yes i agree, take away the white noise and that is exactly what i am hearing too.

            --- In mailto:humforum%40yahoogroups.com, Kevin Hawthorne <skybluepony@...> wrote:
            >
            > The audio guy here again....
            >
            > re: the Youtube video just mentioned:
            >
            > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ldQRMto1kIU
            >
            > As I have mentioned in one or more of my previous posts to this forum, the audible frequency I hear near Denver is precisely 34.5 hz. I have made recordings of the sound on several occasions. The resulting recordings are of extremely low amplitude, and therefore inconclusive unless you've been hearing the sound "live" - i.e., through your own two ears, as well.
            >
            >
            > I have further determined the exact frequency I am experiencing by doubling, tripling, or quadrupling the speed of my recordings, "matching" the frequency using a tone generator and dividing by 2, 3 or 4 respectively. The reason I do this extra step is because frequencies below, say 40 or 50 hz are difficult, but not impossible, to identify, but the doubling, tripling or quadrupling of the frequency allows a very precise identification of original frequency.
            >
            > The sound (besides all the "white" noise in the video) I can distinctly hear in this Youtube video precisely matches a tone generator set to 34.5 hz. The poster of the video has visually highlighted a frequency of 100 hz, but if ANY listener familiar with the basics of music or audio cares to "overlay" an artificially-generated tone of 34.5 hz while simultaneously listening to the Youtube video, the pulsating base frequency of 34.5 can clearly be identified. It seems to be the "root" frequency of audio when played on any decent set of stereo speakers, or while listening through headphones.
            >
            >
            > Some of the other videos on Youtube that highlight this pulsating 34.5 hz frequency are:
            >
            > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mok79ubplDk
            >
            > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LtSDMMDOjKA&feature=related
            >





          • Copsne
            Suzie. It has to do with acoustics and natural frequencies. Sent from Steve s iPhone and I appologize for typo s
            Message 5 of 13 , Jul 9, 2012
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              Suzie. It has to do with acoustics and natural frequencies. 

              Sent from Steve's iPhone and I appologize for typo's

              On Jul 8, 2012, at 6:35 AM, Soozie <soozieqty1@...> wrote:

               

              How in the hell can yelling into a gas pipe compare to this large of a sound? What conclusions can one come to when making such a poor comarative?
              I can't stretch my imagination that far.
              Curious,
              Suzie
               

              From: Copsne <c_o_p_s_ne@...>
              To: "humforum@yahoogroups.com" <humforum@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Saturday, July 7, 2012 5:17 PM
              Subject: Re: HUM_FORUM: Re: Best Hum recording (not an audio simulation)

               
              Tens of thousands of horsepower pushing high pressure gas through steel lines up to 48 inch in dia will do it!  Go to a pipe yard and scream into a large dia steel pipe. It's erie. 

              Sent from Steve's iPhone and I appologize for typo's

              On Jul 7, 2012, at 1:24 PM, Kevin Hawthorne <skybluepony@...> wrote:

               
              It's interesting that this particular frequency (34.5) shows up in several videos but hasn't particularly gained any attention. To be objective, the sound in the particular video we're discussing could be caused by a fan or a motor anything, for that matter. Even the poster of the video was trying to focus our attention on another frequency - or frequencies. It caught my attention because that it what I'm hearing, as well as the poor folks in Windsor who are being driven out of their homes by it.

              As for the trumpet sound you've heard, I have only heard it on videos posted by others. Having spent years creating sound effects for movies, I would say the sound is created by a massive mechanical expulsion of air from a large space (most likely tubular). The amount of air and the spaces involved, and the force to push that much gas outward would have to be massive to create a sound that loud and prolonged. These are only hunches based on my experience as a sound effect "creator". 

              Several "hum" videos on YouTube have this "trumpet" sound. It is similar in every instance, but each has its own personality. Either somebody is very good at creating ungodly sound effects and is overlaying them onto their video creations, or there are massive chambers full of some sort of air or gas that are being forced to expel gas by some unknown force.

              Frankly, listening to the trumpets / groaning / videos sends chills down my spine.....

              The thought has crossed my mind several times that huge tunnels are being ventilated somewhere....??? But the horsepower required to move that much air would be almost beyond imagination.



              From: veiled.mystery <veiled.mystery@...>
              To: humforum@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Saturday, July 7, 2012 2:31 AM
              Subject: HUM_FORUM: Re: Best Hum recording (not an audio simulation)

               
              Hi Kevin,
              Yes i agree, take away the white noise and that is exactly what i am hearing too.

              --- In mailto:humforum%40yahoogroups.com, Kevin Hawthorne <skybluepony@...> wrote:
              >
              > The audio guy here again....
              >
              > re: the Youtube video just mentioned:
              >
              > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ldQRMto1kIU
              >
              > As I have mentioned in one or more of my previous posts to this forum, the audible frequency I hear near Denver is precisely 34.5 hz. I have made recordings of the sound on several occasions. The resulting recordings are of extremely low amplitude, and therefore inconclusive unless you've been hearing the sound "live" - i.e., through your own two ears, as well.
              >
              >
              > I have further determined the exact frequency I am experiencing by doubling, tripling, or quadrupling the speed of my recordings, "matching" the frequency using a tone generator and dividing by 2, 3 or 4 respectively. The reason I do this extra step is because frequencies below, say 40 or 50 hz are difficult, but not impossible, to identify, but the doubling, tripling or quadrupling of the frequency allows a very precise identification of original frequency.
              >
              > The sound (besides all the "white" noise in the video) I can distinctly hear in this Youtube video precisely matches a tone generator set to 34.5 hz. The poster of the video has visually highlighted a frequency of 100 hz, but if ANY listener familiar with the basics of music or audio cares to "overlay" an artificially-generated tone of 34.5 hz while simultaneously listening to the Youtube video, the pulsating base frequency of 34.5 can clearly be identified. It seems to be the "root" frequency of audio when played on any decent set of stereo speakers, or while listening through headphones.
              >
              >
              > Some of the other videos on Youtube that highlight this pulsating 34.5 hz frequency are:
              >
              > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mok79ubplDk
              >
              > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LtSDMMDOjKA&feature=related
              >





            • Copsne
              Do you know anyone that is involved with instrumentation and controls for industrial plants like refineries, steel mills , etc. Or go to the ISO Handbook on
              Message 6 of 13 , Jul 9, 2012
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                Do you know anyone that is involved with instrumentation and controls for industrial plants like refineries, steel mills , etc. 
                Or go to the ISO Handbook on Control Valves. It discusses all sorts of turbulance and aerodynamic noise in these type systems. 
                Also, side connections being added can be contributing to the aeolian (blow over bottle) noise generation. Thou not being vented, same internal closed system issues are occurring. 

                 I think much more of the overall hum problems are generated by other things like machinery (high pressure compressors) carry through noise. 

                All very solid engineering suggestions. But without govts and the company cooperation, people that understand this stuff and how it may contribute to the hum, rumbling story, will just have to develop the facts on our own, and hope we get our day in court

                Sent from Steve's iPhone and I appologize for typo's

                On Jul 7, 2012, at 7:34 PM, Kevin Hawthorne <skybluepony@...> wrote:

                 

                Okay... so you're aware of a possible mechanism. The trumpet sounds I've heard on video and the ones that veiled mystery is referring to (I believe) are the ones the sound like they are being "vented" into the open atmosphere. The uncontrolled pitch has the sound of gas or air traveling a distance within a containing structure, then suddenly finding NO resistance, resulting in the characteristic - for lack of a better term - "spastic" sound - like a huge monster exhaling in its death throes.

                Can you think of places where this gas supply system "vents" into the atmosphere?


                From: Copsne <c_o_p_s_ne@...>
                To: "humforum@yahoogroups.com" <humforum@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Saturday, July 7, 2012 4:17 PM
                Subject: Re: HUM_FORUM: Re: Best Hum recording (not an audio simulation)

                 
                Tens of thousands of horsepower pushing high pressure gas through steel lines up to 48 inch in dia will do it!  Go to a pipe yard and scream into a large dia steel pipe. It's erie. 

                Sent from Steve's iPhone and I appologize for typo's

                On Jul 7, 2012, at 1:24 PM, Kevin Hawthorne <skybluepony@...> wrote:

                 
                It's interesting that this particular frequency (34.5) shows up in several videos but hasn't particularly gained any attention. To be objective, the sound in the particular video we're discussing could be caused by a fan or a motor anything, for that matter. Even the poster of the video was trying to focus our attention on another frequency - or frequencies. It caught my attention because that it what I'm hearing, as well as the poor folks in Windsor who are being driven out of their homes by it.

                As for the trumpet sound you've heard, I have only heard it on videos posted by others. Having spent years creating sound effects for movies, I would say the sound is created by a massive mechanical expulsion of air from a large space (most likely tubular). The amount of air and the spaces involved, and the force to push that much gas outward would have to be massive to create a sound that loud and prolonged. These are only hunches based on my experience as a sound effect "creator". 

                Several "hum" videos on YouTube have this "trumpet" sound. It is similar in every instance, but each has its own personality. Either somebody is very good at creating ungodly sound effects and is overlaying them onto their video creations, or there are massive chambers full of some sort of air or gas that are being forced to expel gas by some unknown force.

                Frankly, listening to the trumpets / groaning / videos sends chills down my spine.....

                The thought has crossed my mind several times that huge tunnels are being ventilated somewhere....??? But the horsepower required to move that much air would be almost beyond imagination.




                From: veiled.mystery <veiled.mystery@...>
                To: humforum@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Saturday, July 7, 2012 2:31 AM
                Subject: HUM_FORUM: Re: Best Hum recording (not an audio simulation)

                 
                Hi Kevin,
                Yes i agree, take away the white noise and that is exactly what i am hearing too.

                --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, Kevin Hawthorne <skybluepony@...> wrote:
                >
                > The audio guy here again....
                >
                > re: the Youtube video just mentioned:
                >
                > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ldQRMto1kIU
                >
                > As I have mentioned in one or more of my previous posts to this forum, the audible frequency I hear near Denver is precisely 34.5 hz. I have made recordings of the sound on several occasions. The resulting recordings are of extremely low amplitude, and therefore inconclusive unless you've been hearing the sound "live" - i.e., through your own two ears, as well.
                >
                >
                > I have further determined the exact frequency I am experiencing by doubling, tripling, or quadrupling the speed of my recordings, "matching" the frequency using a tone generator and dividing by 2, 3 or 4 respectively. The reason I do this extra step is because frequencies below, say 40 or 50 hz are difficult, but not impossible, to identify, but the doubling, tripling or quadrupling of the frequency allows a very precise identification of original frequency.
                >
                > The sound (besides all the "white" noise in the video) I can distinctly hear in this Youtube video precisely matches a tone generator set to 34.5 hz. The poster of the video has visually highlighted a frequency of 100 hz, but if ANY listener familiar with the basics of music or audio cares to "overlay" an artificially-generated tone of 34.5 hz while simultaneously listening to the Youtube video, the pulsating base frequency of 34.5 can clearly be identified. It seems to be the "root" frequency of audio when played on any decent set of stereo speakers, or while listening through headphones.
                >
                >
                > Some of the other videos on Youtube that highlight this pulsating 34.5 hz frequency are:
                >
                > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mok79ubplDk
                >
                > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LtSDMMDOjKA&feature=related
                >





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