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Re: HUM_FORUM: Another Hum Story Springs Forth

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  • David Deming
    Message 1 of 11 , Sep 30, 2004
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      Re: HUM_FORUM:   Another Hum Story Springs Forth
      The correct link for the Hum story is:

      http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99996464


    • Anne
      http://wwwnewscientist.com/news.jsp?id=ns9996464
      Message 2 of 11 , Sep 30, 2004
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      • Mark Langwell
        With the local intensity of earthquakes here in the Portland area, namely Mt. Saint Helens, and the markedly increase in my sensitivity to the HUM, I was
        Message 3 of 11 , Sep 30, 2004
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          With the local intensity of earthquakes here in the Portland area, namely Mt. Saint Helens, and the markedly increase in my sensitivity to the HUM, I was believing that even with all the scientific explanations and theories around I was hearing something different.  With me, the HUM increased whenever I was in close proximety to mountains.  6 years ago I took my daughter on a vacation to Chicago and Indiana and although we had a great time, I found myself becoming depressed.  I can recall that for that time up there from Phoenix Arizona, the HUM was either gone or barely audible to me.  Coming back through Texas I thought I was experiencing a panic attack.  I felt better in New Mexico and now realize it was because I was nearing the mountains once again and the HUM was back.  I have been hearing it so long that it now felt like "HOME" was not far away.  In 2000 during the Seattle earthquake, I remember sitting at my computer looking out the window.  Moments before the ground started shaking, I felt like I was hit in the back of the head and developeda severe headache.  The headache went away within hours of the subsidence.  Lately here in Oregon, even while working in the FAB, I am feeling the beginnings of a headache and the HUM is more intense.  The building is built to disperse ground quaking and even the excessive noise within the FAB cannot drown out the HUM.  Take this for what you will, but I believe I have found my root cause. The earth itself and would that make the HUM its song?

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        • Tobypaws2002@aol.com
          In a message dated 30/09/2004 13:28:06 GMT Daylight Time, profdeming@earthlink.net writes: The correct link for the Hum story is:
          Message 4 of 11 , Oct 1, 2004
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            In a message dated 30/09/2004 13:28:06 GMT Daylight Time, profdeming@... writes:
            The correct link for the Hum story is:

            http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99996464

            If the earth were producing vibrations, then to cause a sound, those vibrations would have to re-radiate from earth into air, and as such, would have to be of such magnitude that a seismometer making measurements on the surface would easily be able to detect it.
            The amplitudes quoted (i.e., extremely small)  I would respectfully suggest are far too small to re-radiate out as noise.
            R.M.    England.
          • Carole Carriker
            Tobypaws2002@aol.com wrote: If the earth were producing vibrations, then to cause a sound, those vibrations would have to re-radiate from earth into air, and
            Message 5 of 11 , Oct 2, 2004
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              Tobypaws2002@... wrote:
              If the earth were producing vibrations, then to cause a sound, those vibrations would have to re-radiate from earth into air, and as such, would have to be of such magnitude that a seismometer making measurements on the surface would easily be able to detect it.
              The amplitudes quoted (i.e., extremely small)  I would respectfully suggest are far too small to re-radiate out as noise.
              R.M.    England.

              I'm not sure I agree.  I only hear the hum inside, which makes me think that it is probably coming up through the walls from the earth underneath.  Of course it still has to make the air vibrate in order for us to hear it, but the fact that we do hear it tells me it's possible.  (Unless, of course, it's coming from radio waves acting directly on some mechanism in our heads.)  As an aside, the seismometers I've seen are extremely sensitive.  They react if you just stomp your foot down.   ~ Carole


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            • Tobypaws2002@aol.com
              In a message dated 03/10/2004 02:42:13 GMT Daylight Time, ccarrike@yahoo.com writes: If the earth were producing vibrations, then to cause a sound, those
              Message 6 of 11 , Oct 2, 2004
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                In a message dated 03/10/2004 02:42:13 GMT Daylight Time, ccarrike@... writes:
                If the earth were producing vibrations, then to cause a sound, those vibrations would have to re-radiate from earth into air, and as such, would have to be of such magnitude that a seismometer making measurements on the surface would easily be able to detect it.
                The amplitudes quoted (i.e., extremely small)  I would respectfully suggest are far too small to re-radiate out as noise.
                R.M.    England.

                I'm not sure I agree.  I only hear the hum inside, which makes me think that it is probably coming up through the walls from the earth underneath.  Of course it still has to make the air vibrate in order for us to hear it, but the fact that we do hear it tells me it's possible.  (Unless, of course, it's coming from radio waves acting directly on some mechanism in our heads.)  As an aside, the seismometers I've seen are extremely sensitive.  They react if you just stomp your foot down.   ~ Carole


                Yes, so if a seismometer were used at your house where you believe the vibrations are coming up from the ground or through walls, surely a seismometer would be able to detect that? Any chance of getting a seismometer to see what is actually present? If a sensitive seismometer does not pick it up, then wouldn't   that  suggest  excitation of the molecules of the air instaed......i.e., acoustic noise......?
                I agree, even a seismometer of the type available to 'ordinary' folks is  very sensitive : I used one , and concluded that the infinitessimal groundborne vibrations observed were not nearly strong enough to be reponsible for The Hum, especially when a D.A.T. tape recorder replicated the noise exactly ....
                R.M.    England.
              • Lindsay Ferreira
                For the first time in years, I haven t heard it all evening. LF in New Mexico, USA
                Message 7 of 11 , Oct 2, 2004
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                  For the first time in years, I haven't heard it all evening.

                  LF in New Mexico, USA


                • Carole Carriker
                  This is just a random thought, but maybe water molecules are somehow involved. There s water in the ground, and water in our bodies, and some amount in the
                  Message 8 of 11 , Oct 3, 2004
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                    This is just a random thought, but maybe water molecules are somehow involved.  There's water in the ground, and water in our bodies, and some amount in the air.  Would a seismometer react to vibration of water?  It might explain why some people find the hum to be more pronounced on a cloudy day.  As I've said before, I'm no scientist.  Maybe the scientists in our group would have something to say about this.   ~ Carole

                    Tobypaws2002@... wrote:
                    In a message dated 03/10/2004 02:42:13 GMT Daylight Time, ccarrike@... writes:
                    If the earth were producing vibrations, then to cause a sound, those vibrations would have to re-radiate from earth into air, and as such, would have to be of such magnitude that a seismometer making measurements on the surface would easily be able to detect it.
                    The amplitudes quoted (i.e., extremely small)  I would respectfully suggest are far too small to re-radiate out as noise.
                    R.M.    England.

                    I'm not sure I agree.  I only hear the hum inside, which makes me think that it is probably coming up through the walls from the earth underneath.  Of course it still has to make the air vibrate in order for us to hear it, but the fact that we do hear it tells me it's possible.  (Unless, of course, it's coming from radio waves acting directly on some mechanism in our heads.)  As an aside, the seismometers I've seen are extremely sensitive.  They react if you just stomp your foot down.   ~ Carole


                    Yes, so if a seismometer were used at your house where you believe the vibrations are coming up from the ground or through walls, surely a seismometer would be able to detect that? Any chance of getting a seismometer to see what is actually present? If a sensitive seismometer does not pick it up, then wouldn't   that  suggest  excitation of the molecules of the air instaed......i.e., acoustic noise......?
                    I agree, even a seismometer of the type available to 'ordinary' folks is  very sensitive : I used one , and concluded that the infinitessimal groundborne vibrations observed were not nearly strong enough to be reponsible for The Hum, especially when a D.A.T. tape recorder replicated the noise exactly ....
                    R.M.    England.


                    Posting Guidelines:

                    1.  No personal attacks.  But reasoned criticism of
                    ideas and theories is welcome.
                    2.  No gratuitous profanity.
                    3.  No "kook" posts.
                    4.  Limit posts to those that are necessary and have substantive content.  In general, no more than three per person per day.
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                  • Mark Langwell
                    Why would the sound have to re-radiate ? It is possible to induce the hum within air as a ground effect as in the effect of a bass drum in a small room.
                    Message 9 of 11 , Oct 3, 2004
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                      Why would the sound have to "re-radiate"?  It is possible to induce the hum within air as a ground effect as in the effect of a bass drum in a small room.  Cause and effect would account for this.  Lightning causes the same effect.  You feel it in your chest.  What would you rule out in this case?  And by ruling it out, would you be ruling out a physical given?


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                    • Tobypaws2002@aol.com
                      In a message dated 03/10/2004 23:22:59 GMT Daylight Time, astron35@yahoo.com writes: Why would the sound have to re-radiate ? Because if it is travelling
                      Message 10 of 11 , Oct 3, 2004
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                        In a message dated 03/10/2004 23:22:59 GMT Daylight Time, astron35@... writes:
                        Why would the sound have to "re-radiate"? 
                        Because if it is travelling through the ground, to produce a sound in the air, it would need to escape, and vibrate the air, thus stimulating the hearing centre. If it is so strong as to travel up through the body as vibrations, then that will be a strong, easily measurable vibration. A seismometer would easily pick it up, in that case.
                         
                        It is possible to induce the hum within air as a ground effect as in the effect of a bass drum in a small room. 
                        A bass drum in any room , when sounded, will vibrate the air, and that vibration will travel in the air to a listener's ears. If you strike a bass drum in a room, sure some will pass into the ground, but the vast majority of it will be in the air, directly from the vibration skin of the drum.
                         Cause and effect would account for this.  Lightning causes the same effect.  You feel it in your chest. 
                        You don't feel the lightning, unless you are struck directly. I think you mean thunder, which is low frequency sound.
                         
                        What would you rule out in this case?  And by ruling it out, would you be ruling out a physical given?
                        What is a "physical given"?
                        R.M.    England.
                         
                      • Mark Langwell
                        The given that the atmosphere itself carries soundwaves. ... Do you Yahoo!? vote.yahoo.com - Register online to vote today!
                        Message 11 of 11 , Oct 4, 2004
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                          The given that the atmosphere itself carries soundwaves.


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