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Re: HUM_FORUM: Fwd: South west London hum

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  • James Cartledge
    Thank you Gail. FYI, my reply: Hi Lidia, wow – you re here and you hear it too. As it happens and as I write it s worse than I ve ever heard it, I think.
    Message 1 of 5 , May 8 4:32 AM
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      Thank you Gail. FYI, my reply:

      Hi Lidia,

      wow – you're here and you hear it too. As it happens and as I write it's worse than I've ever heard it, I think. It's midday and I'm on the first floor of my house. It's really intrusive; I have to say I don't usually find it interferes or bothers me particularly except at night, but right now it's loud.

      I don't know about measuring it, or devices that might do it, or trying to identify its frequency or location. I just know that I hear it and nobody I've mentioned it to does. It's always the same tone. I really think that it IS 'in my head'; by which I mean the sound that I perceive isn't coming from outside as such; it's my skull or some peculiarity of my physiology that reacts with other outside sources. It could be that something quite ordinary is creating a frequency which resonates with the resonant frequency (this is worth reading: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resonance) of something in my head, for example. I couldn't possibly find its source by listening to its direction of origin, but then I also know that the human ear can't distinguish the direction of the origin of low frequencies. (Whereas we have a very acute sense of the direction of the source of high frequencies.) So… I just don't know. I usually suspect that it's traffic noise that has this effect, but if you've read the posts from Christina (ckerekes108@...) in remotest Canada (see below), this can't be the case.

      Do you have any suspicions as to what might be making this noise round here? I wonder about it being a part of migraine headaches too but don't know much about them.

      James


      I live in a very remote part of Ontario, Canada, near a very large nature reserve, no towns or cities nearby, no power lines (my home is off grid on 100 acres and hence we run no electrical appliances other than some lights via solar panels) no mining, no military, no cell reception (or cell towers, logically). I hear the Hum constantly, it has become my companion. Guests who come and stay for a while begin to hear it after their third day here (one the ringing in the ears from city living clears). There is no physical explanation to this, no root cause, we've investigated every possible angle. Friends who live 2 miles from us also hear it. Our property is geographically located on the Canadian Shield. The Hum is as loud inside as it is outside. It can be heard a little louder in winter than summer, but when there is no wind equally loud in the summer.
      I cannot find a scientific, logical explanation for this. People who live in towns and cities could have a wide range of choices as per the cause of the sound -- but certainly not here. We are literally, in the middle of nowhere.
      I had friends who did a canoe trip into the isolated wilderness of the Yukon, even more remote than where we live, and they expressed hearing the Hum up there...
      Any ideas would be appreciated, I'd love to have some dialogue around this.


      On 6 May 2012, at 16:18, Gail Walker wrote:

       

      Hi Lidia,

       I'm posting this to the forum in case you wanted it there, your reply went to me as I had replied to James' post...

      ---------- Forwarded message ----------
      From: lidia1313 <lidia1313@...>
      Date: Sun, May 6, 2012 at 7:59 AM
      Subject: Re: South west London hum
      To: dalynige <gailwal@...>


      Dear James,

      I too, live in Teddington, and hear the Hum as well. It started in March 2012. I have been gone through hell with so many sleepless nights. It sounds acoustic to me, also electrical, the resonance that it gives sounds like a wind blowing through a huge metal pipe, sometimes as a very deep bass-hum. It is pretty intrusive and can take over your normal activities. It causes me insomnia, headaches, dizziness, nausea and vibrations in the feet (and God only knows what else on a more subtile body and mind level). Needless to say that I feel so depressed from its presence.

      I do not have a musical background, but have quite a good musical hearing and if there were a software, I would try to reproduce it. The strange thing about this Hum is that it is impossible to be recorded by even the finest microphone. It makes a ringing pressure to the ears but it is not coming from your head. Low frequency noises like the Hum actually penetrate the body through the bones, e.g. through the skull directly in the inner ear. But if you press firmly your palms (or any hard object) against your ears, you will stop hearing it.

      I have noticed also that during some times the Hum dissapears or diminishes greatly, but this is when I start feeling the vibrations of it, and they are coming through the bottom of my feet and toes. Also, the Hum is louder when it rains, it is cold and humid, but it stops completely when there is a very strong wind (like in a tempest). It never goes away fully, you can either hear it or feel its vibrations. In fact, in physics, noise is equal to vibrations.

      I have recently contacted the EHOs and they could not record the actual sound of the Hum, even at its loudest pitch. I guess, this is because they have used a Z-weihgted meter and and A-weighted scale to measure it, instead of the recommended G-weighting. From their readings, I can see a peak of 12.5 Hz at 52 Db, very much below the average hearing threshold. The ones who are blessed with higher sensitivity are the cursed ones with the Hum.

      I have read the post about the potential Lime disease connection but I am not convinced it has something to do with this Hum, because four other independent people could hear the Hum in my flat. By the way, have you had an eye infection recently? This is since I started to her the Hum. I also got a tinnitus in my right ear since then.

      I forgot to mention, if you look to relocate, you must do so away from the SW London, the Hum is everywhere there (it is in Kingston and Hampton for sure), but maybe in Central London, or Chiswick, it is less disturbing. Also, look for a ground floor flat and avoid pointed roof houses; the closer to the ground, the lesser it could be heard, though you can't escape the vibration effect.

      I am sorry for the long post, but I would be glad to hear from you or other hum sufferers...

      Keep well and try to escape, I believe there are still places WITHOUT THE HUM!!!

      Lidia

      --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, "dalynige" <gailwal@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > Just to mention again that for me it does change depending on where I am.  I hear it most of the time at my current location west of Ottawa, Canada but it is not as loud and disturbing as it was 150 miles from here, also in the country. (It also will disappear for a day or two and I still can't correlate that with anything, absent last night in fact)
      > In Ottawa I've heard it in several places, usually not so loud.  But I don't think I heard it much on my last trip south, through Belize, Mexico and Guatemala (what are gas lines like there?). And I spent 4 weeks in the area of Lake Atitlan and didn't hear it at all.
      > Thanks again for all your efforts and I'm glad to hear the tone generator has helped. I don't need it now but it's good to know it exists as an option.
      >
      > --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, "michael439297" <mspro69@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Dear James
      > >
      > > No, the hum has found you and you'll hear it everywhere you go. It's not local. It's the whole world, apparently. It's rather amusing to read on here about sufferers talking about local conditions somewhere in America. I hear it just the same in little ol' England.
      > >
      > > It's global and it's  "hear" to stay. You just have to live with it.
      > >
      > > I feel sorry for you younger ones just starting to hear it. I was 55 and that was 6 years ago. It's a personal hell, I'm afraid.
      > >
      > > Best wishes from Lynn
      > >
      > > --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, "James" <james@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Hello all,
      > > >
      > > > I'm very glad to have found you - I was beginning to think I was going mad. I get a hum here in Teddington, near Richmond in SW London. It's really quite noticeable at all times of the day, as long as it's reasonably quiet. I'm 37 and a trained musician (bassoon, guitar, voice). Nobody else in the house seems to notice it. It's particularly bad at night when I'm trying to sleep.
      > > >
      > > > I'd say it's impossible to work out where it's coming from – as I've seen mentioned by others, it seems as though it's coming from inside my head. Anyway I just wanted to say thank you and I'll be visiting in future in the hope that someone might work out what it's all about.
      > > >
      > > > James
      > > >
      > >
      >





      --


      Gail




    • Copsne
      Did chritina ever post her location, latitude/ longitude? Sent from Steve s iPhone and I appologize for typo s ... Did chritina ever post her location,
      Message 2 of 5 , May 8 7:45 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        Did chritina ever post her location, latitude/ longitude?

        Sent from Steve's iPhone and I appologize for typo's

        On May 8, 2012, at 7:32 AM, James Cartledge <james@...> wrote:

        Thank you Gail. FYI, my reply:

        Hi Lidia,

        wow – you're here and you hear it too. As it happens and as I write it's worse than I've ever heard it, I think. It's midday and I'm on the first floor of my house. It's really intrusive; I have to say I don't usually find it interferes or bothers me particularly except at night, but right now it's loud.

        I don't know about measuring it, or devices that might do it, or trying to identify its frequency or location. I just know that I hear it and nobody I've mentioned it to does. It's always the same tone. I really think that it IS 'in my head'; by which I mean the sound that I perceive isn't coming from outside as such; it's my skull or some peculiarity of my physiology that reacts with other outside sources. It could be that something quite ordinary is creating a frequency which resonates with the resonant frequency (this is worth reading: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resonance) of something in my head, for example. I couldn't possibly find its source by listening to its direction of origin, but then I also know that the human ear can't distinguish the direction of the origin of low frequencies. (Whereas we have a very acute sense of the direction of the source of high frequencies.) So… I just don't know. I usually suspect that it's traffic noise that has this effect, but if you've read the posts from Christina (ckerekes108@...) in remotest Canada (see below), this can't be the case.

        Do you have any suspicions as to what might be making this noise round here? I wonder about it being a part of migraine headaches too but don't know much about them.

        James


        I live in a very remote part of Ontario, Canada, near a very large nature reserve, no towns or cities nearby, no power lines (my home is off grid on 100 acres and hence we run no electrical appliances other than some lights via solar panels) no mining, no military, no cell reception (or cell towers, logically). I hear the Hum constantly, it has become my companion. Guests who come and stay for a while begin to hear it after their third day here (one the ringing in the ears from city living clears). There is no physical explanation to this, no root cause, we've investigated every possible angle. Friends who live 2 miles from us also hear it. Our property is geographically located on the Canadian Shield. The Hum is as loud inside as it is outside. It can be heard a little louder in winter than summer, but when there is no wind equally loud in the summer.
        I cannot find a scientific, logical explanation for this. People who live in towns and cities could have a wide range of choices as per the cause of the sound -- but certainly not here. We are literally, in the middle of nowhere.
        I had friends who did a canoe trip into the isolated wilderness of the Yukon, even more remote than where we live, and they expressed hearing the Hum up there...
        Any ideas would be appreciated, I'd love to have some dialogue around this.


        On 6 May 2012, at 16:18, Gail Walker wrote:

         

        Hi Lidia,

         I'm posting this to the forum in case you wanted it there, your reply went to me as I had replied to James' post...

        ---------- Forwarded message ----------
        From: lidia1313 <lidia1313@...>
        Date: Sun, May 6, 2012 at 7:59 AM
        Subject: Re: South west London hum
        To: dalynige <gailwal@...>


        Dear James,

        I too, live in Teddington, and hear the Hum as well. It started in March 2012. I have been gone through hell with so many sleepless nights. It sounds acoustic to me, also electrical, the resonance that it gives sounds like a wind blowing through a huge metal pipe, sometimes as a very deep bass-hum. It is pretty intrusive and can take over your normal activities. It causes me insomnia, headaches, dizziness, nausea and vibrations in the feet (and God only knows what else on a more subtile body and mind level). Needless to say that I feel so depressed from its presence.

        I do not have a musical background, but have quite a good musical hearing and if there were a software, I would try to reproduce it. The strange thing about this Hum is that it is impossible to be recorded by even the finest microphone. It makes a ringing pressure to the ears but it is not coming from your head. Low frequency noises like the Hum actually penetrate the body through the bones, e.g. through the skull directly in the inner ear. But if you press firmly your palms (or any hard object) against your ears, you will stop hearing it.

        I have noticed also that during some times the Hum dissapears or diminishes greatly, but this is when I start feeling the vibrations of it, and they are coming through the bottom of my feet and toes. Also, the Hum is louder when it rains, it is cold and humid, but it stops completely when there is a very strong wind (like in a tempest). It never goes away fully, you can either hear it or feel its vibrations. In fact, in physics, noise is equal to vibrations.

        I have recently contacted the EHOs and they could not record the actual sound of the Hum, even at its loudest pitch. I guess, this is because they have used a Z-weihgted meter and and A-weighted scale to measure it, instead of the recommended G-weighting. From their readings, I can see a peak of 12.5 Hz at 52 Db, very much below the average hearing threshold. The ones who are blessed with higher sensitivity are the cursed ones with the Hum.

        I have read the post about the potential Lime disease connection but I am not convinced it has something to do with this Hum, because four other independent people could hear the Hum in my flat. By the way, have you had an eye infection recently? This is since I started to her the Hum. I also got a tinnitus in my right ear since then.

        I forgot to mention, if you look to relocate, you must do so away from the SW London, the Hum is everywhere there (it is in Kingston and Hampton for sure), but maybe in Central London, or Chiswick, it is less disturbing. Also, look for a ground floor flat and avoid pointed roof houses; the closer to the ground, the lesser it could be heard, though you can't escape the vibration effect.

        I am sorry for the long post, but I would be glad to hear from you or other hum sufferers...

        Keep well and try to escape, I believe there are still places WITHOUT THE HUM!!!

        Lidia

        --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, "dalynige" <gailwal@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > Just to mention again that for me it does change depending on where I am.  I hear it most of the time at my current location west of Ottawa, Canada but it is not as loud and disturbing as it was 150 miles from here, also in the country. (It also will disappear for a day or two and I still can't correlate that with anything, absent last night in fact)
        > In Ottawa I've heard it in several places, usually not so loud.  But I don't think I heard it much on my last trip south, through Belize, Mexico and Guatemala (what are gas lines like there?). And I spent 4 weeks in the area of Lake Atitlan and didn't hear it at all.
        > Thanks again for all your efforts and I'm glad to hear the tone generator has helped. I don't need it now but it's good to know it exists as an option.
        >
        > --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, "michael439297" <mspro69@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Dear James
        > >
        > > No, the hum has found you and you'll hear it everywhere you go. It's not local. It's the whole world, apparently. It's rather amusing to read on here about sufferers talking about local conditions somewhere in America. I hear it just the same in little ol' England.
        > >
        > > It's global and it's  "hear" to stay. You just have to live with it.
        > >
        > > I feel sorry for you younger ones just starting to hear it. I was 55 and that was 6 years ago. It's a personal hell, I'm afraid.
        > >
        > > Best wishes from Lynn
        > >
        > > --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, "James" <james@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > Hello all,
        > > >
        > > > I'm very glad to have found you - I was beginning to think I was going mad. I get a hum here in Teddington, near Richmond in SW London. It's really quite noticeable at all times of the day, as long as it's reasonably quiet. I'm 37 and a trained musician (bassoon, guitar, voice). Nobody else in the house seems to notice it. It's particularly bad at night when I'm trying to sleep.
        > > >
        > > > I'd say it's impossible to work out where it's coming from – as I've seen mentioned by others, it seems as though it's coming from inside my head. Anyway I just wanted to say thank you and I'll be visiting in future in the hope that someone might work out what it's all about.
        > > >
        > > > James
        > > >
        > >
        >





        --


        Gail



        <PastedGraphic-2.tiff>

        =
      • James Cartledge
        Hi Steve, Lidia lives in my beautiful hometown of Teddington. I don t know what the lat/long is but if you look at Google Earth you ll find pretty much exactly
        Message 3 of 5 , May 8 12:09 PM
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi Steve,

          Lidia lives in my beautiful hometown of Teddington. I don't know what the lat/long is but if you look at Google Earth you'll find pretty much exactly where I live at postcode TW11 9DH. I have a big flat-headed weeping silver birch overhanging the pavement at the crossroads.

          Sorry – I didn't read your post properly. I don't know Christina's lat/long but you can get here at ckerekes108@...

          Cheers

          James


          On 8 May 2012, at 15:45, Copsne wrote:

           

          Did chritina ever post her location, latitude/ longitude?

          Sent from Steve's iPhone and I appologize for typo's

          On May 8, 2012, at 7:32 AM, James Cartledge <james@...> wrote:

          Thank you Gail. FYI, my reply:

          Hi Lidia,

          wow – you're here and you hear it too. As it happens and as I write it's worse than I've ever heard it, I think. It's midday and I'm on the first floor of my house. It's really intrusive; I have to say I don't usually find it interferes or bothers me particularly except at night, but right now it's loud.

          I don't know about measuring it, or devices that might do it, or trying to identify its frequency or location. I just know that I hear it and nobody I've mentioned it to does. It's always the same tone. I really think that it IS 'in my head'; by which I mean the sound that I perceive isn't coming from outside as such; it's my skull or some peculiarity of my physiology that reacts with other outside sources. It could be that something quite ordinary is creating a frequency which resonates with the resonant frequency (this is worth reading: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resonance) of something in my head, for example. I couldn't possibly find its source by listening to its direction of origin, but then I also know that the human ear can't distinguish the direction of the origin of low frequencies. (Whereas we have a very acute sense of the direction of the source of high frequencies.) So… I just don't know. I usually suspect that it's traffic noise that has this effect, but if you've read the posts from Christina (ckerekes108@...) in remotest Canada (see below), this can't be the case.

          Do you have any suspicions as to what might be making this noise round here? I wonder about it being a part of migraine headaches too but don't know much about them.

          James


          I live in a very remote part of Ontario, Canada, near a very large nature reserve, no towns or cities nearby, no power lines (my home is off grid on 100 acres and hence we run no electrical appliances other than some lights via solar panels) no mining, no military, no cell reception (or cell towers, logically). I hear the Hum constantly, it has become my companion. Guests who come and stay for a while begin to hear it after their third day here (one the ringing in the ears from city living clears). There is no physical explanation to this, no root cause, we've investigated every possible angle. Friends who live 2 miles from us also hear it. Our property is geographically located on the Canadian Shield. The Hum is as loud inside as it is outside. It can be heard a little louder in winter than summer, but when there is no wind equally loud in the summer.
          I cannot find a scientific, logical explanation for this. People who live in towns and cities could have a wide range of choices as per the cause of the sound -- but certainly not here. We are literally, in the middle of nowhere.
          I had friends who did a canoe trip into the isolated wilderness of the Yukon, even more remote than where we live, and they expressed hearing the Hum up there...
          Any ideas would be appreciated, I'd love to have some dialogue around this.


          On 6 May 2012, at 16:18, Gail Walker wrote:

           

          Hi Lidia,

           I'm posting this to the forum in case you wanted it there, your reply went to me as I had replied to James' post...

          ---------- Forwarded message ----------
          From: lidia1313 <lidia1313@...>
          Date: Sun, May 6, 2012 at 7:59 AM
          Subject: Re: South west London hum
          To: dalynige <gailwal@...>


          Dear James,

          I too, live in Teddington, and hear the Hum as well. It started in March 2012. I have been gone through hell with so many sleepless nights. It sounds acoustic to me, also electrical, the resonance that it gives sounds like a wind blowing through a huge metal pipe, sometimes as a very deep bass-hum. It is pretty intrusive and can take over your normal activities. It causes me insomnia, headaches, dizziness, nausea and vibrations in the feet (and God only knows what else on a more subtile body and mind level). Needless to say that I feel so depressed from its presence.

          I do not have a musical background, but have quite a good musical hearing and if there were a software, I would try to reproduce it. The strange thing about this Hum is that it is impossible to be recorded by even the finest microphone. It makes a ringing pressure to the ears but it is not coming from your head. Low frequency noises like the Hum actually penetrate the body through the bones, e.g. through the skull directly in the inner ear. But if you press firmly your palms (or any hard object) against your ears, you will stop hearing it.

          I have noticed also that during some times the Hum dissapears or diminishes greatly, but this is when I start feeling the vibrations of it, and they are coming through the bottom of my feet and toes. Also, the Hum is louder when it rains, it is cold and humid, but it stops completely when there is a very strong wind (like in a tempest). It never goes away fully, you can either hear it or feel its vibrations. In fact, in physics, noise is equal to vibrations.

          I have recently contacted the EHOs and they could not record the actual sound of the Hum, even at its loudest pitch. I guess, this is because they have used a Z-weihgted meter and and A-weighted scale to measure it, instead of the recommended G-weighting. From their readings, I can see a peak of 12.5 Hz at 52 Db, very much below the average hearing threshold. The ones who are blessed with higher sensitivity are the cursed ones with the Hum.

          I have read the post about the potential Lime disease connection but I am not convinced it has something to do with this Hum, because four other independent people could hear the Hum in my flat. By the way, have you had an eye infection recently? This is since I started to her the Hum. I also got a tinnitus in my right ear since then.

          I forgot to mention, if you look to relocate, you must do so away from the SW London, the Hum is everywhere there (it is in Kingston and Hampton for sure), but maybe in Central London, or Chiswick, it is less disturbing. Also, look for a ground floor flat and avoid pointed roof houses; the closer to the ground, the lesser it could be heard, though you can't escape the vibration effect.

          I am sorry for the long post, but I would be glad to hear from you or other hum sufferers...

          Keep well and try to escape, I believe there are still places WITHOUT THE HUM!!!

          Lidia

          --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, "dalynige" <gailwal@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > Just to mention again that for me it does change depending on where I am.  I hear it most of the time at my current location west of Ottawa, Canada but it is not as loud and disturbing as it was 150 miles from here, also in the country. (It also will disappear for a day or two and I still can't correlate that with anything, absent last night in fact)
          > In Ottawa I've heard it in several places, usually not so loud.  But I don't think I heard it much on my last trip south, through Belize, Mexico and Guatemala (what are gas lines like there?). And I spent 4 weeks in the area of Lake Atitlan and didn't hear it at all.
          > Thanks again for all your efforts and I'm glad to hear the tone generator has helped. I don't need it now but it's good to know it exists as an option.
          >
          > --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, "michael439297" <mspro69@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Dear James
          > >
          > > No, the hum has found you and you'll hear it everywhere you go. It's not local. It's the whole world, apparently. It's rather amusing to read on here about sufferers talking about local conditions somewhere in America. I hear it just the same in little ol' England.
          > >
          > > It's global and it's  "hear" to stay. You just have to live with it.
          > >
          > > I feel sorry for you younger ones just starting to hear it. I was 55 and that was 6 years ago. It's a personal hell, I'm afraid.
          > >
          > > Best wishes from Lynn
          > >
          > > --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, "James" <james@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > Hello all,
          > > >
          > > > I'm very glad to have found you - I was beginning to think I was going mad. I get a hum here in Teddington, near Richmond in SW London. It's really quite noticeable at all times of the day, as long as it's reasonably quiet. I'm 37 and a trained musician (bassoon, guitar, voice). Nobody else in the house seems to notice it. It's particularly bad at night when I'm trying to sleep.
          > > >
          > > > I'd say it's impossible to work out where it's coming from – as I've seen mentioned by others, it seems as though it's coming from inside my head. Anyway I just wanted to say thank you and I'll be visiting in future in the hope that someone might work out what it's all about.
          > > >
          > > > James
          > > >
          > >
          >





          --


          Gail



          <PastedGraphic-2.tiff>

          =



        • Copsne
          Hopefully she monitors site and replies. These out of the way data points are actually more informative than the clusters around seattle, san franciso, LA,
          Message 4 of 5 , May 9 3:51 PM
          • 0 Attachment
            Hopefully she monitors site and replies. These out of the way data points are actually more informative than the clusters around seattle, san franciso, LA, salt lake city, alburque, tampa, washington DC up through Hartford Ct, etc.

            Sent from Steve's iPhone and I appologize for typo's

            On May 8, 2012, at 3:09 PM, James Cartledge <james@...> wrote:

            Hi Steve,

            Lidia lives in my beautiful hometown of Teddington. I don't know what the lat/long is but if you look at Google Earth you'll find pretty much exactly where I live at postcode TW11 9DH. I have a big flat-headed weeping silver birch overhanging the pavement at the crossroads.

            Sorry – I didn't read your post properly. I don't know Christina's lat/long but you can get here at ckerekes108@...

            Cheers

            James


            On 8 May 2012, at 15:45, Copsne wrote:

             

            Did chritina ever post her location, latitude/ longitude?

            Sent from Steve's iPhone and I appologize for typo's

            On May 8, 2012, at 7:32 AM, James Cartledge <james@...> wrote:

            Thank you Gail. FYI, my reply:

            Hi Lidia,

            wow – you're here and you hear it too. As it happens and as I write it's worse than I've ever heard it, I think. It's midday and I'm on the first floor of my house. It's really intrusive; I have to say I don't usually find it interferes or bothers me particularly except at night, but right now it's loud.

            I don't know about measuring it, or devices that might do it, or trying to identify its frequency or location. I just know that I hear it and nobody I've mentioned it to does. It's always the same tone. I really think that it IS 'in my head'; by which I mean the sound that I perceive isn't coming from outside as such; it's my skull or some peculiarity of my physiology that reacts with other outside sources. It could be that something quite ordinary is creating a frequency which resonates with the resonant frequency (this is worth reading: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resonance) of something in my head, for example. I couldn't possibly find its source by listening to its direction of origin, but then I also know that the human ear can't distinguish the direction of the origin of low frequencies. (Whereas we have a very acute sense of the direction of the source of high frequencies.) So… I just don't know. I usually suspect that it's traffic noise that has this effect, but if you've read the posts from Christina (ckerekes108@...) in remotest Canada (see below), this can't be the case.

            Do you have any suspicions as to what might be making this noise round here? I wonder about it being a part of migraine headaches too but don't know much about them.

            James


            I live in a very remote part of Ontario, Canada, near a very large nature reserve, no towns or cities nearby, no power lines (my home is off grid on 100 acres and hence we run no electrical appliances other than some lights via solar panels) no mining, no military, no cell reception (or cell towers, logically). I hear the Hum constantly, it has become my companion. Guests who come and stay for a while begin to hear it after their third day here (one the ringing in the ears from city living clears). There is no physical explanation to this, no root cause, we've investigated every possible angle. Friends who live 2 miles from us also hear it. Our property is geographically located on the Canadian Shield. The Hum is as loud inside as it is outside. It can be heard a little louder in winter than summer, but when there is no wind equally loud in the summer.
            I cannot find a scientific, logical explanation for this. People who live in towns and cities could have a wide range of choices as per the cause of the sound -- but certainly not here. We are literally, in the middle of nowhere.
            I had friends who did a canoe trip into the isolated wilderness of the Yukon, even more remote than where we live, and they expressed hearing the Hum up there...
            Any ideas would be appreciated, I'd love to have some dialogue around this.


            On 6 May 2012, at 16:18, Gail Walker wrote:

             

            Hi Lidia,

             I'm posting this to the forum in case you wanted it there, your reply went to me as I had replied to James' post...

            ---------- Forwarded message ----------
            From: lidia1313 <lidia1313@...>
            Date: Sun, May 6, 2012 at 7:59 AM
            Subject: Re: South west London hum
            To: dalynige <gailwal@...>


            Dear James,

            I too, live in Teddington, and hear the Hum as well. It started in March 2012. I have been gone through hell with so many sleepless nights. It sounds acoustic to me, also electrical, the resonance that it gives sounds like a wind blowing through a huge metal pipe, sometimes as a very deep bass-hum. It is pretty intrusive and can take over your normal activities. It causes me insomnia, headaches, dizziness, nausea and vibrations in the feet (and God only knows what else on a more subtile body and mind level). Needless to say that I feel so depressed from its presence.

            I do not have a musical background, but have quite a good musical hearing and if there were a software, I would try to reproduce it. The strange thing about this Hum is that it is impossible to be recorded by even the finest microphone. It makes a ringing pressure to the ears but it is not coming from your head. Low frequency noises like the Hum actually penetrate the body through the bones, e.g. through the skull directly in the inner ear. But if you press firmly your palms (or any hard object) against your ears, you will stop hearing it.

            I have noticed also that during some times the Hum dissapears or diminishes greatly, but this is when I start feeling the vibrations of it, and they are coming through the bottom of my feet and toes. Also, the Hum is louder when it rains, it is cold and humid, but it stops completely when there is a very strong wind (like in a tempest). It never goes away fully, you can either hear it or feel its vibrations. In fact, in physics, noise is equal to vibrations.

            I have recently contacted the EHOs and they could not record the actual sound of the Hum, even at its loudest pitch. I guess, this is because they have used a Z-weihgted meter and and A-weighted scale to measure it, instead of the recommended G-weighting. From their readings, I can see a peak of 12.5 Hz at 52 Db, very much below the average hearing threshold. The ones who are blessed with higher sensitivity are the cursed ones with the Hum.

            I have read the post about the potential Lime disease connection but I am not convinced it has something to do with this Hum, because four other independent people could hear the Hum in my flat. By the way, have you had an eye infection recently? This is since I started to her the Hum. I also got a tinnitus in my right ear since then.

            I forgot to mention, if you look to relocate, you must do so away from the SW London, the Hum is everywhere there (it is in Kingston and Hampton for sure), but maybe in Central London, or Chiswick, it is less disturbing. Also, look for a ground floor flat and avoid pointed roof houses; the closer to the ground, the lesser it could be heard, though you can't escape the vibration effect.

            I am sorry for the long post, but I would be glad to hear from you or other hum sufferers...

            Keep well and try to escape, I believe there are still places WITHOUT THE HUM!!!

            Lidia

            --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, "dalynige" <gailwal@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > Just to mention again that for me it does change depending on where I am.  I hear it most of the time at my current location west of Ottawa, Canada but it is not as loud and disturbing as it was 150 miles from here, also in the country. (It also will disappear for a day or two and I still can't correlate that with anything, absent last night in fact)
            > In Ottawa I've heard it in several places, usually not so loud.  But I don't think I heard it much on my last trip south, through Belize, Mexico and Guatemala (what are gas lines like there?). And I spent 4 weeks in the area of Lake Atitlan and didn't hear it at all.
            > Thanks again for all your efforts and I'm glad to hear the tone generator has helped. I don't need it now but it's good to know it exists as an option.
            >
            > --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, "michael439297" <mspro69@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Dear James
            > >
            > > No, the hum has found you and you'll hear it everywhere you go. It's not local. It's the whole world, apparently. It's rather amusing to read on here about sufferers talking about local conditions somewhere in America. I hear it just the same in little ol' England.
            > >
            > > It's global and it's  "hear" to stay. You just have to live with it.
            > >
            > > I feel sorry for you younger ones just starting to hear it. I was 55 and that was 6 years ago. It's a personal hell, I'm afraid.
            > >
            > > Best wishes from Lynn
            > >
            > > --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, "James" <james@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Hello all,
            > > >
            > > > I'm very glad to have found you - I was beginning to think I was going mad. I get a hum here in Teddington, near Richmond in SW London. It's really quite noticeable at all times of the day, as long as it's reasonably quiet. I'm 37 and a trained musician (bassoon, guitar, voice). Nobody else in the house seems to notice it. It's particularly bad at night when I'm trying to sleep.
            > > >
            > > > I'd say it's impossible to work out where it's coming from – as I've seen mentioned by others, it seems as though it's coming from inside my head. Anyway I just wanted to say thank you and I'll be visiting in future in the hope that someone might work out what it's all about.
            > > >
            > > > James
            > > >
            > >
            >





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            Gail



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