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Re: HUM_FORUM: Re: changes in hum - codes?

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  • JD
    Yes, musical hallucination is an inadequate term in some ways, but it s been used to describe some apparently similar cases. It s interesting that white
    Message 1 of 44 , Dec 6, 2011
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      Yes, "musical hallucination" is an inadequate term in some ways, but it's been used to describe some "apparently" similar cases.

      It's interesting that "white noise" can induce "musical hallucinations" -- because the sound of a fan running, can be very close to "white noise".

      However, this cannot explain why the "music" gets louder when it rains, and while the ground remains damp, and why the music fades away when the ground drys out.

      The damp ground may be "attracting" the microwaves from the cell phone antennas, so there's more microwave power near the earth's surface (down where we live)... and damp ground certainly increases "electrical ground currents" in the earth, near the damp soil's surface.. These "ground currents" are everywhere in North America, but not in Europe (where the electrical power system is configured differently).. And in my case, I live within 500 feet of an electrical power "substation" (a large collection of huge electrical transformers), so the ground currents should be very strong here, especially after it rains.

      Also, this entire area here, is a "liquefaction zone" -- between two close-together earthquake faults -- where the soil can turn semi-liquid, when a strong earthquake occurs, turning the ground to flowing "quick sand", and toppling buildings, or sinking them down into the liquid earth.. Which means there could easily be strong "geopathic radiations" in this area -- the sort of energies which "don't exist" according to "modern science" -- just like "musical hallucinations" don't exist.

      So that's two more things you might look for, on your holiday:
      1) any nearby "electrical power substations", and
      2) the subsoil geology and hydrology, which can be investigated online.

      JD


      --- At 11:06 PM 04 12 2011, Cari wrote:
      >
      >Hi, thanks for the reply - I googled the musical hallucination thing....in my case I'm not sure if it's what I'm experiencing...I don't have hearing loss, am not aged, do not have tinnitus (unless the hum is some strange form of tinnitus)and these factors are what seem to be found in sufferers of these conditions. And why would the fan / rain amplify the music if it wasn't external?
      >But it could be that because of the stress from the hum hearing somehow my brain converted the sounds into a tune or something...although in my case I didn't previously know the tune.
      >I pointed it out to my husband and he said to me he though he could catch something of what I was saying, but it was not conculsive if we were hearing the same thing or not.
      >I'm going on holiday soon so will be interested to see if I still hear these type of things or not!!
      >
      >
      >--- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, JD <emailresearch@...> wrote:
      >>
      >>
      >> --- At 12:59 AM 03 12 2011, Cari wrote:
      >> >
      >> >Hello, bizarre though it sounds I have experienced a little bit of the same of this music / fan phenomena. The normal fairly flat hum I hear at home is usually covered by the ceiling fan. However on occasions when it has been louder and more beat like the fan does seem to amplify it (although its still more bearable than hearing only the hum alone).
      >> >When I was at my inlaws home recently for a couple of nights, I heard this kind of phantom music....a continuous beat / rythm - a bit lullaby like repeated over and over again endlessly. We slept with a table fan on and I kept waking up in the night and hearing this 'music' louder than ever. Then morning time, I woke up an switched the fan off, and the music seemed to stop so I thought - oh it was the fan sound. But then as you say after some time I could still hear the 'music' although fainter....
      >> >But since then I dismissed this as my imagination since I was pretty stressed out with all this hum issue at the time - but after reading your post I think it probablly was real ....there is a mobile tower really close to that home, and the ocean also isn't far away...
      >> >
      >> >I also have found the hum amplified when its raining sometimes, but strong wind seems to almost silence it...
      >> >
      >>
      >>
      >> Hi Cari,
      >>
      >> It's good to know I'm not the only one hearing the "phantom music".
      >>
      >> And thanks for mentioning "lullaby".. Last night I realized that one of
      >> the songs playing here, is the "Mocking Bird Song" --
      >>
      >> "Hush, little baby, don't say a word.
      >> Mama's gonna buy you a mockingbird ..."
      >>
      >> The words are not always distinct, but the inflection is unmistakable.
      >> In fact, these various "Hum songs" often have somewhat indistinct words,
      >> where people who speak another language, would probably hear the lyrics
      >> sung in their own language -- after the brain "translates" the "signal".
      >>
      >> In general, the sound is that of "synthesized voice", or the sound of
      >> a human voice that's been purified and standardized by a synthesizer.
      >>
      >>
      >> Yes, this Hum music definitely increases its volume during and following
      >> rainy weather, when the ground is damp.. (The ocean is only a few miles
      >> away here, too.) And the loudness has been decreased here, during the
      >> recent winds and low humidity..
      >>
      >>
      >> Anyway, there's probably some connection to the following:
      >>
      >>
      >> Google: - "Musical Hallucinations" ... 91,400 results
      >>
      >> http://www.google.com/search?q=%22Musical+Hallucinations%22
      >>
      >> Google: - "musical hallucinations" + "white noise" ... 2,200 results
      >>
      >> http://www.google.com/search?q=%22musical+hallucinations%22+%22white+noise%22
      >>
      >> Google: - white noise hallucinations ... 192,000 results
      >>
      >> http://www.google.com/search?q=white%20noise%20hallucinations
      >>
      >> --- PubMed: - Musical Hallucinations ... 151 results
      >>
      >> http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Musical%20Hallucinations
      >>
      >>
      >> JD
      >>
      >>
      >
      >
      >
    • JD
      ... I think the term musical hallucination is a catch-all category for any rhythmic or melodious sound, that s not heard by most people, and that has no
      Message 44 of 44 , Dec 11, 2011
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        --- At 08:31 PM 10 12 2011, Cari wrote:
        >
        >I am not sure if it is a musical hallucination or not I was getting .I dont think so. But one questions - does a musical hallucination appear like an external sound rather than internal like tinnitus?


        I think the term "musical hallucination" is a catch-all category for
        any rhythmic or melodious sound, that's not heard by most people, and
        that has no "normal" and "accepted" explanation.

        And this can apply to internal, or external "musical sounds" -- when
        the "standard explanations" don't work.. So the term "hallucination"
        can be rather misleading, in some "real" cases.


        >If so why can the hum also not be an auditory hallucination even though it appears external? I dont really think that is the case but am just asking....because some people seem to hear it every where all the time...
        >


        Well, any "musical Hum", that's not heard by most other people, can
        arguably be labelled a "musical hallucination", but that doesn't end
        the question of what is, or isn't, actually occurring in many cases.

        Many times, the majority of people are blinded (or deafened), or
        mistaken, due to powerful cultural programming, and peer pressure to
        always be "normal", and never be "different", etc.

        So, real hallucinations are "really real", regardless of any label.
        And if you want to "Google" to find what's being written about such
        things, then "musical hallucinations" is a category with lots of "hits".


        JD




        ..
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