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Re: HUM_FORUM: Re: Sound recording of artificial aurora

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  • Carole Carriker
    I guess I should have clicked on the link before responding to this. Interesting sounds; thanks for sharing it! ~ Carole humlobotomist
    Message 1 of 12 , Sep 9, 2004
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      I guess I should have clicked on the link before responding to this.  Interesting sounds; thanks for sharing it!   ~ Carole   

      humlobotomist <humlobotomist@...> wrote:

      "From a Swedish web-site comes the news that auroral sounds have at
      last been recorded: "The first successful attempt to record auroral
      sounds has been done. Eigil Ungstrup, scientist from Denmark, has
      recorded sounds by (the) help of a large radio antenna used in the
      (ir) ionosphere investigations. During a period when the antenna was
      not in use, he put a microphone in the focus of the antenna and
      recorded sounds from the northern lights."




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    • David Deming
      I just noted that yahoo has a section at the bottom of the Hum Forum homepage: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/humforum/ titled sponsored links . Evidently,
      Message 2 of 12 , Sep 9, 2004
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        Vacation in Lovely Kokomo, Home of the Hum
        I just noted that yahoo has a section at the bottom of the Hum Forum
        homepage:

        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/humforum/

        titled "sponsored links".  Evidently, these are generated
        automatically by identification of key words.

        I had to laugh.

        One of the links is titled "Research Kokomo Vacations".

        Just the place someone who subscribes to this forum
        would want to vacation!

        What can I say, but LOL.

        --David Deming
        Norman, Oklahoma
      • Tobypaws2002@aol.com
        In a message dated 09/09/2004 14:40:57 GMT Daylight Time, humlobotomist@yahoo.co.uk writes: Just to indicate how little considered the answer from R.M is when
        Message 3 of 12 , Sep 10, 2004
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          In a message dated 09/09/2004 14:40:57 GMT Daylight Time, humlobotomist@... writes:
          Just to indicate how little considered the answer from R.M is when
          stating;

          "And by the way, I am not aware that people have 'talked about' the
          noise for centuries."

          Following documentation show the unawareness and ignorance shown in
          this answer;
          Would the moderator class that as a personal attack?
          Hopefully we might get some more bona fide scientists to comment, and one day we will find out who has most common sense about all this.....
          R.M.  England.
        • Bill Curry
          Humlobotomist, I tried the link that you suggested and saw that the research group did, indeed, have sound recording equipment. One of your other messages
          Message 4 of 12 , Sep 10, 2004
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            Humlobotomist,
            I tried the link that you suggested and saw that the research group did,
            indeed, have sound recording equipment. One of your other messages
            indicated that to make sound recordings, the researchers had to put a
            microphone at the focus of a large parabolic reflector. This indicates to me
            that the sound was extremely weak. I have seen several displays of aurora
            borealis and never heard (with only my ears) any sound associated with the
            aurora. I was not in Alaska and therefore did not see these in Alaska, and
            perhaps I would have heard a sound had I seen the auroras in Alaska. I saw
            the auroras in Tennessee, when I was in college and also much earlier when I
            was a child (the pretty lacy curtain type of auroral display). If the sound
            from an aurora is so weak that one has to have a microphone at the focus of
            a parabolic reflector to record it, it seems unlikely to me that it can
            contribute significantly to the Hum. Likewise, unless you can show that
            any artificial aurora is much stronger than a natural aurora, I don't see
            how you can infer that an artificial aurora can contribute to the Hum as
            sensed by people who have no sensors other than themselves.
            |Bill P. Curry, Ph.D. Physics is fun|
            |(630) 858-9377 Fax (630) 858-9159|
            | EMSciTek Consulting Company |
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "humlobotomist" <humlobotomist@...>
            To: <humforum@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Thursday, September 09, 2004 1:33 AM
            Subject: HUM_FORUM: Sound recording of artificial aurora


            Thank you all of you for taking time two answer my question to Bill
            Curry. I would like to ask one more for Bill, and I would like others
            comments as well, that is good for debate.

            All of you challenge to proove the acoustic side. I just have to say,
            that I am here to help, to find a source of the Hum. Either if some
            people do not agree, I know that other read, and goes hmm,. thats a
            interesting thought. So I will continue the search whereever it lead.

            In some of the answers, for those bother answer the questions asked,
            for me, they are simply not good enough.

            And to not open for long lectures in answers, or comments, I put out
            a simply question regarding artificial aurora, and the fact that they
            are talking about sound recording.

            Bill, talked about that noise, can not be compared with sound.

            In experiment listed below, is this as well that sound is not sound?

            In the link from earlier experimentation;

            http://spaceweb.oulu.fi/campaigns/Nov2001/

            Sound recording by a Sound-recording station were made, and among
            matters in these experiments conducted were;

            Some purposes:

            . GENERATION OF ARTIFICIAL VLF WAVES.
            . D/E-region measurements of energetic particles.
            . D-region electron temperature measurements.
            . AURORA-ASSOCIATED SOUND RECORDINGS WITH SIMULTANEUS
            E-FIELD MEASUREMENTS.
            . ARTIFICIAL AURORA (UK/GE).

            This important things like AURORA-ASSOCIATED SOUND RECORDINGS is my
            main point, how do anyone explain this away?

            I know it is hard, put though I will not be surprised if anyone will
            put an effort to do it!

            So this is the only thing I ask for reply in this mail, specially
            from Bill, a short answer in to lines or word, why Aurora-associated
            sound recordings if it is not a sound, somehow acosutic or
            electromagnetic, I can not explain.

            But a fact, is that this sound, that they wish to measure, it is
            known that humans have heard, how can this be explained, having in
            mind;

            "In recent ionospheric experiments in the auroral zone it has been
            noted that SEE-type emissions have many similarities in common with
            the natural noise-like emissions associated with auroral activity."

            This noise associated with auroral activity, must of course be the
            noise, or sound that people have talked about for centuries.









            Posting Guidelines:

            1. No personal attacks. But reasoned criticism of
            ideas and theories is welcome.

            2. No gratuitous profanity.

            3. No "kook" posts.

            4. Limit posts to those that are necessary and have substantive content.
            In general, no more than three per person per day.

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          • Tobypaws2002@aol.com
            In a message dated 11/09/2004 04:52:37 GMT Daylight Time, bpcurry@worldnet.att.net writes: Humlobotomist, I tried the link that you suggested and saw that the
            Message 5 of 12 , Sep 10, 2004
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              In a message dated 11/09/2004 04:52:37 GMT Daylight Time, bpcurry@... writes:
              Humlobotomist,
                  I tried the link that you suggested and saw that the research group did,
              indeed, have sound recording equipment.  One of your other messages
              indicated that to make sound recordings, the researchers had to put a
              microphone at the focus of a large parabolic reflector. This indicates to me
              that the sound was extremely weak.  I have seen several displays of aurora
              borealis and never heard (with only my ears) any sound associated with the
              aurora.  I was not in Alaska and therefore did not see these in Alaska, and
              perhaps I would have heard a sound had I seen the auroras in Alaska.  I saw
              the auroras in Tennessee, when I was in college and also much earlier when I
              was a child (the pretty lacy curtain type of auroral display).  If the sound
              from an aurora is so weak that one has to have a microphone at the focus of
              a parabolic reflector to record it, it seems unlikely to me that it can
              contribute significantly  to the Hum.  Likewise, unless you can show that
              any artificial aurora is much stronger than a natural aurora, I don't see
              how you can infer that an artificial aurora can contribute to the Hum as
              sensed by people who have no sensors other than themselves.
              |Bill P. Curry, Ph.D.            Physics is fun|
              |(630) 858-9377        Fax (630) 858-9159|
              |      EMSciTek Consulting Company     |
              Bill Curry, you are my hero!
              R.M.   England.
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