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Re: HUM_FORUM: Interesting talk with Cell Phone expert

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  • cindi0398
    Any hum heard way back in ancient days could have been from many or other sources, or perhaps it was a sound way different from today s hum. I honestly do not
    Message 1 of 53 , Jun 7, 2011
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      Any hum heard way back in ancient days could have been from many or other sources, or perhaps it was a sound way different from today's hum. I honestly do not think it is all as mysterious as all that. In the 90's, 80's or even back in WWII there were various communication towers. I wonder - were they all that different than the communications of today? To me, this thing sounds positively man made. I think we should see if we could pursue the idea of determining when towers were planted. And see if we can determine time they shut them down fit maintenance. It may give us a very clear picture ( one way or the other) if this is the cause. At least it's something to work with.
      Pls excuse any of MY typo booboos also.... Gotta luv the iPhone spellcheck!

      --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, "Carole C" <CcSelene7@...> wrote:
      >
      > As I recall, Kurt (a former humforum member) mentioned reading a historical account of early European
      > explorers hearing a hum, and asking the native Americans about it. No cell phone towers, or any other kind of
      > radio towers back then.
      >
      > Questions for Cindi:
      >
      > "So when I asked him about frequency, he said he recalled that the frequency on the mobile towers - those kind
      > that are on the tops of vans for transmitting - was around 45"
      >
      > 45 what?
      >
      > "He wasn't sure what EMFs were"
      >
      > How the heck could somebody work for a cellphone company and not know what electromagnetic fields are???
      >
      > Carole
      >
      >
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: andrea
      >
      > Cindy - thanks for posting that. Very interesting. The only thing I would ask about it is.. I believe it was
      > the early 90's when it was first detected, was it 90's or 80's I think 90's. Well, there would have been very
      > few cell phone towers at that time, and especially in the small town in Taos New Mexico where it was first
      > reported here in the U.S. Oh it's just so confusing the whole thing.
      >
    • Copsne
      Maggie. I am trained as a mech engr, and always an amatuerish rock hound. So Geo acoustic opinion is based on my correlation of the science from the experts
      Message 53 of 53 , Jun 12, 2011
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        Maggie. I am trained as a mech engr, and always an amatuerish rock hound.  So Geo acoustic opinion is based on my correlation of the science from the experts and some personal knowledge of the use of sound for NDE testing(non destructive examination) of industrial equipment, including piping. So i feel prettyconfident to engage with experts on this.
        Different AUS maps show discontinuity lines in the greater NSW area. Keep in mind that regardless of these , our data shows the ILFN travels many miles likely influenced by the substrata make up. Stiff bedrock is a very efficient transmiision media. Depending on how hard or easy the gas line operators need to run their systems,  the sound wave energy incrs/ decrs.  but more importantly the level of activeness (like a calm ocean or a churned up on) of the spectrum of the frequencies. The transmission of the sound waves acts differently in a sound path like a fault than say undisturbed media. Some recent ocean bottom research around this can be found on the internet. The map of US study seems to support this in taos and explains why in other areas the hum is  reported strangely so far from the source i.e vashon Island area in Seattle
        Here's a recent consideration after reading some reports of eartquakes prior to the onset of hum. Of course this needs investigating as we are demanding of congress. But it is possible that the quakes either permanetly or tempoarily create the pathway discussed above
        The faults/ rifts only act as a conduit , obviouly they create occasional noise on their own but are not the root source cause of the varying 24/7/365 type hum we have. 
        The plan is to get congressional attention. Use all the endless full range study work to enligthen researchers where our regulators are for some reason figthing against understanding



        Sent from Steve's iPhone

        On Jun 11, 2011, at 5:34 PM, "Margaret" <coatesmargaret@...> wrote:

         


         I've had a quick web search for geolithic fault maps of the region and found this not very detailed one.  http://home.iprimus.com.au/foo7/volcmap.html
        Scrolling down to the  'Distribution of Intraplate faults' map I can see that there are fault lines along this part of coastal New South Wales.    
        But I'm not clear Steve in what way fault lines would contribute to a 24/7/365  hum.  How would they create/transmit LFN so consistently?

        Maggie Australia  




        --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, Copsne <c_o_p_s_ne@...> wrote:
        >
        > Sorry. One more thing. Maggie, check out the geolofic fault maps for your area. They do exist, and consider the eartquake in newcastle a few years ago as a result of them. Keep in mind this LF stuff can travel hundreds of miles in the right geologic conditions, think elephant communication
        >

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