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Re: HUM_FORUM: Re: Interesting Technology

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  • andrea
    for what it s worth guys, I remember while visiting ashford castle in ireland http://www.ashford.ie/index.php and hearing the hum there.. not sure how that
    Message 1 of 29 , Nov 30, 2010
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      for what it's worth guys, I remember while visiting ashford castle in ireland http://www.ashford.ie/index.php and hearing the hum there.. not sure how that pertains to the room size theory, but it's a pretty vast estate with rooms that speak to its massive size. but then I also remember hearing it out in the countryside where one could only see sheep and pastureland so..





      On Tue, Nov 30, 2010 at 2:59 PM, Margaret <coatesmargaret@...> wrote:
       

      Lyn, your  post and Richard's response to it reminded me that there have been threads discussing how room sizes affect the hum.  When I type in the search term `room dimensions' several long discussions on the topic come up. 

      Just to give a brief explanation.  There's a theory that if the hum is in part, caused by LFN, houses and the rooms within them, have certain shapes and sizes that cause greater resonance of external noise.  The size of a room determines which wavelengths will be amplified by the structure.

      When I joined this forum in 2004 there were only 1600 messages and now there are over 12,400.  They cover many aspects of the hum.  Perhaps a useful contribution as a longstanding member, is to suggest search terms or give links to message numbers that relate to current discussions. 

      So I'll mention message 5806, written after speaking with a musician friend who explains his suggestions for `humproofing' a room and also refers to the hum hearer who used to sleep in a disused army bunker when the hum got too bad at his home.  

      Hope this helps.

      Cheers Maggie

      --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, "Richard G. Dudley" <rgdudley@...> wrote:

      > Better tell us more about that, how is it constructed, is it stone, wood,
      > plaster on lath or ??. Could be important! Is it attached to the house,
      > free standing. Etc.
      >
      > In other words why don't you hear the hum when you are there, and are you
      > sure you don't?

      > Richard
      >
      >

    • michael439297
      Dear Richard This dovecote is old in that it s made from the original bricks so that s about two hundred and fifty years. The old dovecote was pulled down
      Message 2 of 29 , Dec 1, 2010
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        Dear Richard
        This dovecote is "old" in that it's made from the original bricks so that's about two hundred and fifty years. The old dovecote was pulled down ages ago before Michael owned the property and he wanted to replicate it as much as possible and he rebuilt it. It's just solid brick with a window upstairs. But I also don't hear the hum in the barn next to the farmhouse and that's just breezeblocks and corrugated sheets and an old asbestos roof. There is a large electric pole in the garden which gives off a loud hum (and kills any birds unfortunate enough to land on it) but that's not the source of THE hum. The thing is neither of these buildings has any electronic stuff in them.Perhaps that's why there's no hum in there? No modern technology acting as conduits? I dunno!

        Love from Lynn

        .-- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, "Richard G. Dudley" <rgdudley@...> wrote:
        >
        > Lynn: You said:
        >
        >
        >
        > "we have an old dovecote and I don't hear the hum when I step into that"
        >
        >
        >
        > Better tell us more about that, how is it constructed, is it stone, wood,
        > plaster on lath or ??. Could be important! Is it attached to the house,
        > free standing. Etc.
        >
        >
        >
        > In other words why don't you hear the hum when you are there, and are you
        > sure you don't?
        >
        >
        >
        > Richard
        >
        >
        >
        > From: humforum@yahoogroups.com [mailto:humforum@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
        > Of michael439297
        > Sent: Tuesday, November 30, 2010 4:54 AM
        > To: humforum@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: HUM_FORUM: Re: Interesting Technology
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Dear Richard
        > I like your water fountain idea too. Water noise is very soothing. I used to
        > have an aquarium for the kids many years ago long before the hum and noticed
        > then that the low soothing noise of the filter masked out any noises from
        > next door. I now live in an old farm house with wooden floors and original
        > oak beams but I hear the hum in new houses just the same as here although we
        > have an old dovecote and I don't hear the hum when I step into that.
        > Love from Lynn
        >
        > --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com <mailto:humforum%40yahoogroups.com> ,
        > "Richard G. Dudley" <rgdudley@> wrote:
        > >
        > > I really like your aquarium idea…. I think I will try that! I hadn't
        > > thought of putting an aquarium in the bedroom.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > One of those little water fountains might work too. I have an old
        > fireplace
        > > in our bedroom (it is an old house … with lots of resonating wood floors L
        > )
        > > which I had thought to put some grow lights in… but a fountain in that
        > > little garden might be good too!
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > From: humforum@yahoogroups.com <mailto:humforum%40yahoogroups.com>
        > [mailto:humforum@yahoogroups.com <mailto:humforum%40yahoogroups.com> ] On
        > Behalf
        > > Of michael439297
        > > Sent: Wednesday, November 24, 2010 6:51 AM
        > > To: humforum@yahoogroups.com <mailto:humforum%40yahoogroups.com>
        > > Subject: HUM_FORUM: Re: Interesting Technology
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Dear Patty
        > > No, I don't have anything running at night to mask the noise, mainly
        > because
        > > I share my bed with Michael so it wouldn't be fair to him. And the noise
        > > would irritate me anyway!
        > > I have thought about getting an aquarium of fish as the bubbling noise of
        > > the filter should help mask the noise and also it would be an interesting
        > > feature, but then I'd have thr hassle of looking after the fish and I've
        > > enough to look after as it is and I try to keep my life simple.
        > > The hum has been quite intense these last two nights and I have had quite
        > > disturbing nightmares on both nights and then woken up to a very loud hum
        > > and vibration so I think when you are lucky to drop asleep, despite the
        > hum,
        > > it affects your dreams.
        > > Love from Lynn
        > > --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com <mailto:humforum%40yahoogroups.com>
        > <mailto:humforum%40yahoogroups.com> ,
        > > "patty94@" <patty94@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com <mailto:humforum%40yahoogroups.com>
        > <mailto:humforum%40yahoogroups.com> ,
        > > "michael439297" <mspro69@> wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > I don't do anything to mask the noise of the hum. I refuse to put
        > myself
        > > out for it! I will beat it myself! My eyes glaze over when technology is
        > > discussed in general. I don't even use ear plugs. I just try to ignore the
        > > hum, block it out with my mind. I did try to fight against it at first,
        > > looking for an obvious source,gradually "coming out" and "confessing" to
        > > various friends and family that I lived with a dreadful secret,and meeting
        > > with bewilderment at best and downright incredulity at worst,but gradually
        > > as all options were tried ,and the hum continued, I realised this was a
        > > nightmare that had descended on me and I would have to live with it.
        > > > >
        > > > > I realised long before I heard the hum that I have a low tolerance
        > level
        > > for life and its tribulations in general and I wonder if this is something
        > > hum sufferers have in common? I'm interested to discuss what we all have
        > in
        > > common to see if this is why certain character types are picking up on
        > this
        > > phenomenon.
        > > > >
        > > > > Love from Lynn( see, I don't even have a computer. I use Michael's!
        > And
        > > I can't work a DVD recorder or set digital clocks etc!)
        > > > >
        > > > > "Interesting technology" is an oxymoron to me!!
        > > > >
        > > > > Hi Lynn; Don't you even sleep with a fan running at night? I don't
        > think
        > > it has to do with character. I think it has to do with maybe our skulls
        > are
        > > a bit thinner and we have good inner ear tuning to the special vibrations.
        > > Maybe we're a bit more brave than others because we are searching and
        > > speaking about the hum on here.
        > > > I don't think it is a flaw to be sensitive. I do think the scientist are
        > > wrong for putting all of us through this though, they could at least be
        > > honest about it.
        > > > Patty
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > What's the alternative?!
        > > > >
        > > > > --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com <mailto:humforum%40yahoogroups.com>
        > <mailto:humforum%40yahoogroups.com> ,
        > > "mack_colin" <mack_colin@> wrote:
        > > > > >
        > > > > > There is no way I would buy any car that eminates low frequency
        > waves
        > > just to get a 1 MPG improvement. Crazy stuff. I cannot even stand a rattle
        > > anywhere in my car. he He.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > As for noise cancelling headphones, well I bought a SONY set many
        > > years ago when I first got the hum, and they cost around £100 (they were
        > > dear then, but a lot cheaper now).
        > > > > >
        > > > > > I agree with the member above who has a set, that they are not much
        > > good against stopping hearing the hum.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > You can use them as musical headphones, which I do, and being very
        > > good quality, give a brilliant sound.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > You can switch on the AAA battery operated noise canceling and they
        > > give a low hiss without any music, which can help a bit against the hum,
        > > just like white noise effects, also the headphones being large padded
        > > affairs also reduce all outside noise a bit.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > But overall they do not stop the hum getting through.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Cheers Colin Mack, Scotland.
        > > > > >
        > > > >
        > > >
        > >
        >
      • Margaret
        Hi Andrea, There s better people than me to explain this. I flounder a bit with anything to do with physics, but basically which frequencies get amplified,
        Message 3 of 29 , Dec 1, 2010
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          Hi Andrea, 

          There's better people than me to explain this.  I flounder a bit with anything to do with physics, but basically which frequencies get amplified, depends mainly on the length of the room.  In a small room frequencies with shorter wavelengths are amplified.  They're higher pitched ones.  In a long large room frequencies with longer wavelengths, that is the lower infrasound frequencies are amplified.  Like 16 Hz the lowest note on an organ.  

          All the other frequencies are there too though, just the ones with matching wavelengths get amplified.   

          Lucky you visiting Ireland.  I love castles.  We don't have them here.   Some researchers think the reason why castles and such get a reputation for being haunted is because certain infrasound frequencies, I think it's 19Hz, can cause feelings of uneasiness, anxiety and fear in people. Hence the buildings feel as if they are haunted.  I think that can include electromagnetic frequencies as well.


          --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, andrea <savingtess@...> wrote:
          >
          > for what it's worth guys, I remember while visiting ashford castle in
          > ireland http://www.ashford.ie/index.php and hearing the hum there.. not sure
          > how that pertains to the room size theory, but it's a pretty vast estate
          > with rooms that speak to its massive size. but then I also remember hearing
          > it out in the countryside where one could only see sheep and pastureland
          > so..
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > On Tue, Nov 30, 2010 at 2:59 PM, Margaret coatesmargaret@... wrote:
          >
          > >
          > >
          > > Lyn, your post and Richard's response to it reminded me that there have
          > > been threads discussing how room sizes affect the hum. When I type in the
          > > search term `room dimensions' several long discussions on the topic come
          > > up.
          > >
          > > Just to give a brief explanation. There's a theory that if the hum is in
          > > part, caused by LFN, houses and the rooms within them, have certain shapes
          > > and sizes that cause greater resonance of external noise. The size of a
          > > room determines which wavelengths will be amplified by the structure.
          > >
          > > When I joined this forum in 2004 there were only 1600 messages and
          > > now there are over 12,400. They cover many aspects of the hum. Perhaps a
          > > useful contribution as a longstanding member, is to suggest search terms
          > > or give links to message numbers that relate to current discussions.
          > >
          > > So I'll mention message 5806, written after speaking with a musician friend
          > > who explains his suggestions for `humproofing' a room and also refers to the
          > > hum hearer who used to sleep in a disused army bunker when the hum got too
          > > bad at his home.
          > >
          > > Hope this helps.
          > >
          > > Cheers Maggie
          > > --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, "Richard G. Dudley" rgdudley@ wrote:
          > >
          > > > Better tell us more about that, how is it constructed, is it stone, wood,
          > > > plaster on lath or ??. Could be important! Is it attached to the house,
          > > > free standing. Etc.
          > > >
          > > > In other words why don't you hear the hum when you are there, and are you
          > > > sure you don't?
          > > >
          > > > Richard
          > > >
          > > >
          > >
          > >
          >
        • andrea
          How would one go about explaining then, the HUM being heard in desolate places? e.g. deserts, fields, ranges, etc... At least my Hum is heard in places
          Message 4 of 29 , Dec 1, 2010
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            How would one go about explaining then, the HUM being heard in desolate places? e.g. deserts, fields, ranges, etc... At least my Hum is heard in places enclosed, or wide open spaces. Perhaps my Hum is claustrophobic. = )

            Oh.. oh the haunting's.. I quite like what Mark Twain had to say about them.. " I don't believe in ghosts.. I'm just afraid of them." :D






            On Wed, Dec 1, 2010 at 7:17 PM, Margaret <coatesmargaret@...> wrote:
             

            Hi Andrea, 


            There's better people than me to explain this.  I flounder a bit with anything to do with physics, but basically which frequencies get amplified, depends mainly on the length of the room.  In a small room frequencies with shorter wavelengths are amplified.  They're higher pitched ones.  In a long large room frequencies with longer wavelengths, that is the lower infrasound frequencies are amplified.  Like 16 Hz the lowest note on an organ.  

            All the other frequencies are there too though, just the ones with matching wavelengths get amplified.   

            Lucky you visiting Ireland.  I love castles.  We don't have them here.   Some researchers think the reason why castles and such get a reputation for being haunted is because certain infrasound frequencies, I think it's 19Hz, can cause feelings of uneasiness, anxiety and fear in people. Hence the buildings feel as if they are haunted.  I think that can include electromagnetic frequencies as well.


            --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, andrea <savingtess@...> wrote:
            >
            > for what it's worth guys, I remember while visiting ashford castle in
            > ireland http://www.ashford.ie/index.php and hearing the hum there.. not sure
            > how that pertains to the room size theory, but it's a pretty vast estate
            > with rooms that speak to its massive size. but then I also remember hearing
            > it out in the countryside where one could only see sheep and pastureland
            > so..
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > On Tue, Nov 30, 2010 at 2:59 PM, Margaret coatesmargaret@... wrote:
            >
            > >
            > >
            > > Lyn, your post and Richard's response to it reminded me that there have
            > > been threads discussing how room sizes affect the hum. When I type in the
            > > search term `room dimensions' several long discussions on the topic come
            > > up.
            > >
            > > Just to give a brief explanation. There's a theory that if the hum is in
            > > part, caused by LFN, houses and the rooms within them, have certain shapes
            > > and sizes that cause greater resonance of external noise. The size of a
            > > room determines which wavelengths will be amplified by the structure.
            > >
            > > When I joined this forum in 2004 there were only 1600 messages and
            > > now there are over 12,400. They cover many aspects of the hum. Perhaps a
            > > useful contribution as a longstanding member, is to suggest search terms
            > > or give links to message numbers that relate to current discussions.
            > >
            > > So I'll mention message 5806, written after speaking with a musician friend
            > > who explains his suggestions for `humproofing' a room and also refers to the
            > > hum hearer who used to sleep in a disused army bunker when the hum got too
            > > bad at his home.
            > >
            > > Hope this helps.
            > >
            > > Cheers Maggie
            > > --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, "Richard G. Dudley" rgdudley@ wrote:
            > >
            > > > Better tell us more about that, how is it constructed, is it stone, wood,
            > > > plaster on lath or ??. Could be important! Is it attached to the house,
            > > > free standing. Etc.
            > > >
            > > > In other words why don't you hear the hum when you are there, and are you
            > > > sure you don't?
            > > >
            > > > Richard
            > > >
            > > >
            > >
            > >
            >

          • Arne
            Amen. Arne Central MN, USA From: humforum@yahoogroups.com [mailto:humforum@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of andrea How would one go about explaining then, the HUM
            Message 5 of 29 , Dec 1, 2010
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              Amen.

               

              Arne

              Central MN, USA

               

              From: humforum@yahoogroups.com [mailto:humforum@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of andrea

              How would one go about explaining then, the HUM being heard in desolate places? e.g. deserts, fields, ranges, etc...

            • Margaret
              I don t know Andrea. I ve heard it in remote places too. ... desolate ... in ... claustrophobic. = )
              Message 6 of 29 , Dec 1, 2010
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                I don't know Andrea.  I've heard it in remote places too.  


                --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, andrea <savingtess@...> wrote:
                >
                > How would one go about explaining then, the HUM being heard in desolate
                > places? e.g. deserts, fields, ranges, etc... At least my Hum is heard in
                > places enclosed, or wide open spaces. Perhaps my Hum is claustrophobic. = )
                >
              • wzvarick@verizon.net
                Andrea when you say your hum is in enclosed places or wide open spaces, seems like that covers everything, no? Dec 2, 2010 12:55:27 AM,
                Message 7 of 29 , Dec 2, 2010
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                  Andrea when you say your hum is in enclosed places "or" wide open spaces, seems like that covers everything, no?
                   
                  Dec 2, 2010 12:55:27 AM, humforum@yahoogroups.com wrote:
                   

                  How would one go about explaining then, the HUM being heard in desolate places? e.g. deserts, fields, ranges, etc... At least my Hum is heard in places enclosed, or wide open spaces. Perhaps my Hum is claustrophobic. = )

                  Oh.. oh the haunting's.. I quite like what Mark Twain had to say about them.. " I don't believe in ghosts.. I'm just afraid of them." :D






                  On Wed, Dec 1, 2010 at 7:17 PM, Margaret <coatesmargaret@...> wrote:
                   

                  Hi Andrea, 


                  There's better people than me to explain this.  I flounder a bit with anything to do with physics, but basically which frequencies get amplified, depends mainly on the length of the room.  In a small room frequencies with shorter wavelengths are amplified.  They're higher pitched ones.  In a long large room frequencies with longer wavelengths, that is the lower infrasound frequencies are amplified.  Like 16 Hz the lowest note on an organ.  

                  All the other frequencies are there too though, just the ones with matching wavelengths get amplified.   

                  Lucky you visiting Ireland.  I love castles.  We don't have them here.   Some researchers think the reason why castles and such get a reputation for being haunted is because certain infrasound frequencies, I think it's 19Hz, can cause feelings of uneasiness, anxiety and fear in people. Hence the buildings feel as if they are haunted.  I think that can include electromagnetic frequencies as well.


                  --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, andrea wrote:
                  >
                  > for what it's worth guys, I remember while visiting ashford castle in
                  > ireland http://www.ashford.ie/index.php and hearing the hum there.. not sure
                  > how that pertains to the room size theory, but it's a pretty vast estate
                  > with rooms that speak to its massive size. but then I also remember hearing
                  > it out in the countryside where one could only see sheep and pastureland
                  > so..
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > On Tue, Nov 30, 2010 at 2:59 PM, Margaret coatesmargaret@... wrote:
                  >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Lyn, your post and Richard's response to it reminded me that there have
                  > > been threads discussing how room sizes affect the hum. When I type in the
                  > > search term `room dimensions' several long discussions on the topic come
                  > > up.
                  > >
                  > > Just to give a brief explanation. There's a theory that if the hum is in
                  > > part, caused by LFN, houses and the rooms within them, have certain shapes
                  > > and sizes that cause greater resonance of external noise. The size of a
                  > > room determines which wavelengths will be amplified by the structure.
                  > >
                  > > When I joined this forum in 2004 there were only 1600 messages and
                  > > now there are over 12,400. They cover many aspects of the hum. Perhaps a
                  > > useful contribution as a longstanding member, is to suggest search terms
                  > > or give links to message numbers that relate to current discussions.
                  > >
                  > > So I'll mention message 5806, written after speaking with a musician friend
                  > > who explains his suggestions for `humproofing' a room and also refers to the
                  > > hum hearer who used to sleep in a disused army bunker when the hum got too
                  > > bad at his home.
                  > >
                  > > Hope this helps.
                  > >
                  > > Cheers Maggie
                  > > --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, "Richard G. Dudley" rgdudley@ wrote:
                  > >
                  > > > Better tell us more about that, how is it constructed, is it stone, wood,
                  > > > plaster on lath or ??. Could be important! Is it attached to the house,
                  > > > free standing. Etc.
                  > > >
                  > > > In other words why don't you hear the hum when you are there, and are you
                  > > > sure you don't?
                  > > >
                  > > > Richard
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >

                • andrea
                  I try. ... In all seriousness though, it does seem like the HUM is everywhere we go regardless of where we are at. It s a mystery whose depths seem to know no
                  Message 8 of 29 , Dec 2, 2010
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                    I try.

                    :D

                    In all seriousness though, it does seem like the HUM is everywhere we go regardless of where we are at. It's a mystery whose depths seem to know no end.






                    On Thu, Dec 2, 2010 at 9:07 AM, <wzvarick@...> wrote:
                     

                    Andrea when you say your hum is in enclosed places "or" wide open spaces, seems like that covers everything, no?
                     
                    Dec 2, 2010 12:55:27 AM, humforum@yahoogroups.com wrote:
                     

                    How would one go about explaining then, the HUM being heard in desolate places? e.g. deserts, fields, ranges, etc... At least my Hum is heard in places enclosed, or wide open spaces. Perhaps my Hum is claustrophobic. = )

                    Oh.. oh the haunting's.. I quite like what Mark Twain had to say about them.. " I don't believe in ghosts.. I'm just afraid of them." :D






                    On Wed, Dec 1, 2010 at 7:17 PM, Margaret <coatesmargaret@...> wrote:
                     

                    Hi Andrea, 


                    There's better people than me to explain this.  I flounder a bit with anything to do with physics, but basically which frequencies get amplified, depends mainly on the length of the room.  In a small room frequencies with shorter wavelengths are amplified.  They're higher pitched ones.  In a long large room frequencies with longer wavelengths, that is the lower infrasound frequencies are amplified.  Like 16 Hz the lowest note on an organ.  

                    All the other frequencies are there too though, just the ones with matching wavelengths get amplified.   

                    Lucky you visiting Ireland.  I love castles.  We don't have them here.   Some researchers think the reason why castles and such get a reputation for being haunted is because certain infrasound frequencies, I think it's 19Hz, can cause feelings of uneasiness, anxiety and fear in people. Hence the buildings feel as if they are haunted.  I think that can include electromagnetic frequencies as well.


                    --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, andrea wrote:
                    >
                    > for what it's worth guys, I remember while visiting ashford castle in
                    > ireland http://www.ashford.ie/index.php and hearing the hum there.. not sure
                    > how that pertains to the room size theory, but it's a pretty vast estate
                    > with rooms that speak to its massive size. but then I also remember hearing
                    > it out in the countryside where one could only see sheep and pastureland
                    > so..
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > On Tue, Nov 30, 2010 at 2:59 PM, Margaret coatesmargaret@... wrote:
                    >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Lyn, your post and Richard's response to it reminded me that there have
                    > > been threads discussing how room sizes affect the hum. When I type in the
                    > > search term `room dimensions' several long discussions on the topic come
                    > > up.
                    > >
                    > > Just to give a brief explanation. There's a theory that if the hum is in
                    > > part, caused by LFN, houses and the rooms within them, have certain shapes
                    > > and sizes that cause greater resonance of external noise. The size of a
                    > > room determines which wavelengths will be amplified by the structure.
                    > >
                    > > When I joined this forum in 2004 there were only 1600 messages and
                    > > now there are over 12,400. They cover many aspects of the hum. Perhaps a
                    > > useful contribution as a longstanding member, is to suggest search terms
                    > > or give links to message numbers that relate to current discussions.
                    > >
                    > > So I'll mention message 5806, written after speaking with a musician friend
                    > > who explains his suggestions for `humproofing' a room and also refers to the
                    > > hum hearer who used to sleep in a disused army bunker when the hum got too
                    > > bad at his home.
                    > >
                    > > Hope this helps.
                    > >
                    > > Cheers Maggie
                    > > --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, "Richard G. Dudley" rgdudley@ wrote:
                    > >
                    > > > Better tell us more about that, how is it constructed, is it stone, wood,
                    > > > plaster on lath or ??. Could be important! Is it attached to the house,
                    > > > free standing. Etc.
                    > > >
                    > > > In other words why don't you hear the hum when you are there, and are you
                    > > > sure you don't?
                    > > >
                    > > > Richard
                    > > >
                    > > >
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                  • Donna Few
                    Andre, That s exactly what I went all over town fishing for prior to moving from my hum annointed house. Well, no such device apparently existed yet. I also
                    Message 9 of 29 , Feb 8, 2011
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Andre,

                      That's exactly what I went all over town fishing for prior to moving from my hum annointed house.  Well, no such device apparently existed yet.  I also thought, why not,  if noise canceling headphones and stereo systems exist , where is the freestanding noise canceling device?  Apparently, the science of noise canceling is still limited, I do believe advancements in the direction we are hoping for is being pursued.

                      Donna



                      From: "fish7days@..." <n1ajv@...>
                      To: humforum@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Sat, November 27, 2010 6:19:49 AM
                      Subject: HUM_FORUM: Re: Interesting Technology

                      If I may, I'd like to bring the thread back to the original question, as it seems to have diverged to a variety of other topics.

                      The original question was posted with the hope that it may catch the interest of someone with electronics training, in an effort to see if the technology employed in this vehicle can possibly be crossed over to home use. Chevy has obviously figured out how to capture the sound and create the inverse sound waves to cancel the LFN. If this could be employed in a freestanding unit that can be used in the home, it may very well bring relief to many of us.

                      I'm sure none of us want to sleep with headphones, earplugs, white noise, aquarium pumps (which incidentally create a 50Hz droan) and the like.

                      Andre





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