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Finally I feel like I'm not going crazy

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  • mandywill70
    Hi, I ve been hearing the hum (described perfectly here and on wikipedia) for the last couple of months. Actually that s not completely true. I did hear it
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 27 10:44 PM
      Hi,

      I've been hearing the hum (described perfectly here and on wikipedia) for the last couple of months. Actually that's not completely true. I did hear it earlier this year for a couple of months then it went away and came back.

      I live in Melbourne's middle to inner north and we are approximately 180 to 200 metres from transmission lines.

      My partner and son cannot here it and I honestly thought I was going a bit mad. I was really worried that it was something internal rather than external but I can't hear it in other locations, It's really only at home indoors where it is worse at night and unfortunately worst of all in the bedroom (of all places!) It's hardly perceptable when I go outside to investigate. While earplugs don't help that much I really sense it is external rather than an internal tinnitis (or going mad)thing. I don't find it excrutiating and it doesn't effect my sleep (although having said that, I did wake up once with it). I can usually block it out by not thinking about it(although as mentioned here by others, it's caused me to put my book down in despair at night, which is usually my favourite thing to do)

      Anyway, I do have a question! At the moment there is major sewerage pipeline work going on underground spanning about one to three kilometres from where I live (The National Sewerage Project - NSP). After the first 'bout' of humming noise ended there was something on the evening news about this sewerage project and how 'the Victoria' - the massive drill they are using - was working away 'day and night as Melbourne slept'. I thought "Aha! That's what the hum was" and since the noise had gone I didn't give it another thought. When the hum returned, My partner contacted the NSP on my behalf but the person he spoke to said it would be impossible for me to hear anything as the digging was about 2 kilometres away. However, now that I know this humming only effects 1 to 10 percent of the population, I'm thinking that the NSP rep was referring to the obvious grinding noise and not the low frequency vibration I'm experiencing. I'm really really hoping that this is the case as it is scheduled to finish soon, otherwise I'm worried it might be the transmission lines. Any thoughts? Info?
    • Carole C
      Low frequency noise can travel very long distances, and 2 kilometres isn t that far. I live about 2 miles from a train track, and I can hear the low frequency
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 1, 2010
        Low frequency noise can travel very long distances, and 2 kilometres isn't that far. I live about 2 miles
        from a train track, and I can hear the low frequency vibrations from the trains long before I actually hear
        the train whistles.

        At any rate, if the sound you're hearing is coming from the drilling, you'll know when they stop drilling.
        Let us know...

        Carole


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "mandywill70" <mandywill70@...>
        To: <humforum@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Sunday, December 27, 2009 10:44 PM
        Subject: HUM_FORUM: Finally I feel like I'm not going crazy


        Hi,

        I've been hearing the hum (described perfectly here and on wikipedia) for the last couple of months. Actually
        that's not completely true. I did hear it earlier this year for a couple of months then it went away and came
        back.

        I live in Melbourne's middle to inner north and we are approximately 180 to 200 metres from transmission
        lines.

        My partner and son cannot here it and I honestly thought I was going a bit mad. I was really worried that it
        was something internal rather than external but I can't hear it in other locations, It's really only at home
        indoors where it is worse at night and unfortunately worst of all in the bedroom (of all places!) It's hardly
        perceptable when I go outside to investigate. While earplugs don't help that much I really sense it is
        external rather than an internal tinnitis (or going mad)thing. I don't find it excrutiating and it doesn't
        effect my sleep (although having said that, I did wake up once with it). I can usually block it out by not
        thinking about it(although as mentioned here by others, it's caused me to put my book down in despair at
        night, which is usually my favourite thing to do)

        Anyway, I do have a question! At the moment there is major sewerage pipeline work going on underground
        spanning about one to three kilometres from where I live (The National Sewerage Project - NSP). After the
        first 'bout' of humming noise ended there was something on the evening news about this sewerage project and
        how 'the Victoria' - the massive drill they are using - was working away 'day and night as Melbourne slept'. I
        thought "Aha! That's what the hum was" and since the noise had gone I didn't give it another thought. When the
        hum returned, My partner contacted the NSP on my behalf but the person he spoke to said it would be impossible
        for me to hear anything as the digging was about 2 kilometres away. However, now that I know this humming only
        effects 1 to 10 percent of the population, I'm thinking that the NSP rep was referring to the obvious grinding
        noise and not the low frequency vibration I'm experiencing. I'm really really hoping that this is the case as
        it is scheduled to finish soon, otherwise I'm worried it might be the transmission lines. Any thoughts? Info?



        ------------------------------------

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      • glitchinmymatrix
        Sorry, I wish I could help you, but all the help I can offer is that the government doesn t care much for your suffering unless it generates them profits or
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 2, 2010
          Sorry, I wish I could help you, but all the help I can offer is that the government doesn't care much for your suffering unless it generates them profits or spares them loses in some way. I suffer the awful hum like you do, and my only solution to a good night's rest is to drink alcohol in excess. Why it makes the noise go away, I don't know...but it does

          --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, "mandywill70" <mandywill70@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi,
          >
          > I've been hearing the hum (described perfectly here and on wikipedia) for the last couple of months. Actually that's not completely true. I did hear it earlier this year for a couple of months then it went away and came back.
          >
          > I live in Melbourne's middle to inner north and we are approximately 180 to 200 metres from transmission lines.
          >
          > My partner and son cannot here it and I honestly thought I was going a bit mad. I was really worried that it was something internal rather than external but I can't hear it in other locations, It's really only at home indoors where it is worse at night and unfortunately worst of all in the bedroom (of all places!) It's hardly perceptable when I go outside to investigate. While earplugs don't help that much I really sense it is external rather than an internal tinnitis (or going mad)thing. I don't find it excrutiating and it doesn't effect my sleep (although having said that, I did wake up once with it). I can usually block it out by not thinking about it(although as mentioned here by others, it's caused me to put my book down in despair at night, which is usually my favourite thing to do)
          >
          > Anyway, I do have a question! At the moment there is major sewerage pipeline work going on underground spanning about one to three kilometres from where I live (The National Sewerage Project - NSP). After the first 'bout' of humming noise ended there was something on the evening news about this sewerage project and how 'the Victoria' - the massive drill they are using - was working away 'day and night as Melbourne slept'. I thought "Aha! That's what the hum was" and since the noise had gone I didn't give it another thought. When the hum returned, My partner contacted the NSP on my behalf but the person he spoke to said it would be impossible for me to hear anything as the digging was about 2 kilometres away. However, now that I know this humming only effects 1 to 10 percent of the population, I'm thinking that the NSP rep was referring to the obvious grinding noise and not the low frequency vibration I'm experiencing. I'm really really hoping that this is the case as it is scheduled to finish soon, otherwise I'm worried it might be the transmission lines. Any thoughts? Info?
          >
        • coatesmargaret
          To answer your question Mandywill, I found this on a website. Russian Scientists have recently succeeded in propagating artificial ULF signals over a distance
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 2, 2010
            To answer your question Mandywill, I found this on a website.

            "Russian Scientists have recently succeeded in propagating artificial ULF signals over a distance of 1500 km (Bolyaev et al 2004)."

            Also, from what I experienced, water pipes and sewage lines can contribute to the hum, but I don't think they are the only source. Two years before I spoke to the local council about the hum, a man living forty kms away had complained. Council hired a consultant who identified the source as a sewage pumping station. He recorded frequencies of 10 -12.5 Hz at 38 decibels. Council spent $100,000 reinforcing the building with thick concrete walls, but the man still heard the hum.

            The main water pipe into town ran 400ms from the house where I used to live. And in the same culvert was a 660 volt power line. On some nights the hum had a direction. From inside my car with engine off, I took compass headings from fifteen different locations, over a distance of several kms. The water engineer confirmed that the compass headings accurately plotted the location of the water pipe.

            Having moved, I now hear the hum very little and sometimes not at all. I'd wish that and a hum free 2010 for everyone. Maggie NSW
          • TIM CZEROW
            Don t let this phenomenon get to you. You need to find something else to take your mind off it. I went through the same experiences most of the folks on here
            Message 5 of 6 , Jan 2, 2010
              Don't let this phenomenon get to you. You need to find something else to take your mind off it. I went through the same experiences most of the folks on here write about. I found the more time I spent on the computer reading this forum, trying to explain the source, walking around outside or driving and checking out the nearby electrical grid substations - the more I focused on "the hum" the more it kept me awake to the point it affected my health.
              I've heard this noise in many different locations across the U.S. it doesn't matter if it's urban areas or remote mountain regions far from any source of man made sounds, signals etc. I'm almost convinced that I'd be able to hear it anywhere/anytime if I tried hard enough.
              If it starts getting to you, try backing off, not being so curious about it. When it starts up try to ignore it. If you have to go to sleep with the TV on, do it. Eventually, hopefully you'll be able to put it out of your head and make peace with it.
              Good luck all.
              Happy and quiet/peaceful New Year to all.
               - Weels
              Northern NY State


              From: mandywill70 <mandywill70@...>
              To: humforum@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Mon, December 28, 2009 1:44:04 AM
              Subject: HUM_FORUM: Finally I feel like I'm not going crazy

               

              Hi,

              I've been hearing the hum (described perfectly here and on wikipedia) for the last couple of months. Actually that's not completely true. I did hear it earlier this year for a couple of months then it went away and came back.

              I live in Melbourne's middle to inner north and we are approximately 180 to 200 metres from transmission lines.

              My partner and son cannot here it and I honestly thought I was going a bit mad. I was really worried that it was something internal rather than external but I can't hear it in other locations, It's really only at home indoors where it is worse at night and unfortunately worst of all in the bedroom (of all places!) It's hardly perceptable when I go outside to investigate. While earplugs don't help that much I really sense it is external rather than an internal tinnitis (or going mad)thing. I don't find it excrutiating and it doesn't effect my sleep (although having said that, I did wake up once with it). I can usually block it out by not thinking about it(although as mentioned here by others, it's caused me to put my book down in despair at night, which is usually my favourite thing to do)

              Anyway, I do have a question! At the moment there is major sewerage pipeline work going on underground spanning about one to three kilometres from where I live (The National Sewerage Project - NSP). After the first 'bout' of humming noise ended there was something on the evening news about this sewerage project and how 'the Victoria' - the massive drill they are using - was working away 'day and night as Melbourne slept'. I thought "Aha! That's what the hum was" and since the noise had gone I didn't give it another thought. When the hum returned, My partner contacted the NSP on my behalf but the person he spoke to said it would be impossible for me to hear anything as the digging was about 2 kilometres away. However, now that I know this humming only effects 1 to 10 percent of the population, I'm thinking that the NSP rep was referring to the obvious grinding noise and not the low frequency vibration I'm experiencing. I'm really really hoping that this is the case as it is scheduled to finish soon, otherwise I'm worried it might be the transmission lines. Any thoughts? Info?


            • mandywill70
              Thanks to everyone who replied to my message. Especially Tim, yeah I really think I have to back off a bit and not get so obsessed. I was actually fine for a
              Message 6 of 6 , Jan 19, 2010
                Thanks to everyone who replied to my message. Especially Tim, yeah I really think I have to back off a bit and not get so obsessed. I was actually fine for a while and just put it at the back of my mind then last week the fact that it's still there and that it is SOOO incessant got the better of me (hence why I am back here!). That droning in the bedroom at night, wow - very hard to ignore, somehow I manage to fall asleep as quickly as normal, thank god!

                I just hate that my partner can't hear it so I just have to wonder what is wrong with me? I've called the Sewerage project myself and they let me know the drill isn't going 24/7 like I thought (although there are people working at the sites 24/7). The rep told me no-one else has 'complained', even the people who live directly above the tunnel burrowing. He was pretty friendly and sympathetic though and gave me a specific time that the drilling would cease so I could see for myself whether the hum was there or not (it was still there). Finally he told me they could come out and do a vibration/noise test with their equipment which I might take them up on.

                Other than that I've told the council and will see what happens there. There are factories on the other side of a creek we are near so maybe one has installed a new generator or air con or something.

                In the meantime I am going to TRY and keep it at the back of my mind. I'm lucky in that it doesn't seem to affect me anywhere else (we went away over christmas for a four days and absolutely no hum) - maybe I might even try hypnosis if it still affects me or doesn't go away!

                Thanks
                Mandy


                --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, TIM CZEROW <weels@...> wrote:
                >
                > Don't let this phenomenon get to you. You need to find something else to take your mind off it. I went through the same experiences most of the folks on here write about. I found the more time I spent on the computer reading this forum, trying to explain the source, walking around outside or driving and checking out the nearby electrical grid substations - the more I focused on "the hum" the more it kept me awake to the point it affected my health.
                > I've heard this noise in many different locations across the U.S. it doesn't matter if it's urban areas or remote mountain regions far from any source of man made sounds, signals etc. I'm almost convinced that I'd be able to hear it anywhere/anytime if I tried hard enough.
                > If it starts getting to you, try backing off, not being so curious about it. When it starts up try to ignore it. If you have to go to sleep with the TV on, do it. Eventually, hopefully you'll be able to put it out of your head and make peace with it.
                > Good luck all.
                > Happy and quiet/peaceful New Year to all.
                >  - Weels
                > Northern NY State
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > ________________________________
                > From: mandywill70 <mandywill70@...>
                > To: humforum@yahoogroups.com
                > Sent: Mon, December 28, 2009 1:44:04 AM
                > Subject: HUM_FORUM: Finally I feel like I'm not going crazy
                >
                >  
                > Hi,
                >
                > I've been hearing the hum (described perfectly here and on wikipedia) for the last couple of months. Actually that's not completely true. I did hear it earlier this year for a couple of months then it went away and came back.
                >
                > I live in Melbourne's middle to inner north and we are approximately 180 to 200 metres from transmission lines.
                >
                > My partner and son cannot here it and I honestly thought I was going a bit mad. I was really worried that it was something internal rather than external but I can't hear it in other locations, It's really only at home indoors where it is worse at night and unfortunately worst of all in the bedroom (of all places!) It's hardly perceptable when I go outside to investigate. While earplugs don't help that much I really sense it is external rather than an internal tinnitis (or going mad)thing. I don't find it excrutiating and it doesn't effect my sleep (although having said that, I did wake up once with it). I can usually block it out by not thinking about it(although as mentioned here by others, it's caused me to put my book down in despair at night, which is usually my favourite thing to do)
                >
                > Anyway, I do have a question! At the moment there is major sewerage pipeline work going on underground spanning about one to three kilometres from where I live (The National Sewerage Project - NSP). After the first 'bout' of humming noise ended there was something on the evening news about this sewerage project and how 'the Victoria' - the massive drill they are using - was working away 'day and night as Melbourne slept'. I thought "Aha! That's what the hum was" and since the noise had gone I didn't give it another thought. When the hum returned, My partner contacted the NSP on my behalf but the person he spoke to said it would be impossible for me to hear anything as the digging was about 2 kilometres away. However, now that I know this humming only effects 1 to 10 percent of the population, I'm thinking that the NSP rep was referring to the obvious grinding noise and not the low frequency vibration I'm experiencing. I'm really really hoping that this
                > is the case as it is scheduled to finish soon, otherwise I'm worried it might be the transmission lines. Any thoughts? Info?
                >
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