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Re: HUM_FORUM: Re: My hum

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  • Carole C
    Al, any thoughts about synesthesia as a possible explanation? Something that we re sensing that s not sound, but is being reported by our brains as such?
    Message 1 of 15 , Dec 12, 2009
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      Al, any thoughts about synesthesia as a possible explanation? Something that we're sensing that's not sound,
      but is being "reported" by our brains as such?

      Carole


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "metaphid1" <al.porterfield@...>
      To: <humforum@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Saturday, December 12, 2009 5:30 AM
      Subject: HUM_FORUM: Re: My hum



      Dear Patty,

      Maybe, but I'm unconvinced. The following description of the microwave hearing effect comes from one of J. C.
      Lin's papers:

      "The sensation has been described as a click, buzz or chirp depending on the modulation characteristics of the
      impinging radiation."

      That simply doesn't match my experience, and it doesn't sound like the persistent hum described by many on
      this forum.


      Al



      > >Hi Al;
      > Since your trained in an area of neuroscience I'll try again.
      > You would be very interested in reading papers by James C. Lin and Henry Lai. They have done research into
      > Microwave Hearing and the effects caused by it.
      > James C. Lin is director of the ICNIRP.
      > You are not hallucinating - you have self tuning outer hair cells in your cochlea, that are working very
      > well.
      > John A. D'Andrea and DR Justesen have done some research on the cognitive effects from microwaves.
      >
      > It's very interesting research, know that many hear it too.
      > Patty
      >




      ------------------------------------

      Posting Guidelines:

      1. The orientation of this forum is scientific, with everything that implies. Reasoned and articulate
      criticism of ideas and theories is welcome.
      2. The following are not allowed: personal attacks, gratuitous profanity, "kook" posts, and supernatural
      explanations.
      3. Limit posts to those that are necessary and have substantive content. In general, no more than three per
      person per day.
      4. If you hear the Hum, please post your location at: www.frappr.com/humhearersYahoo! Groups Links
    • Carole C
      Al (again)... I ve mentioned this before, but before you joined the forum. A couple of times I ve notice an abrupt change in the Hum, and later checking
      Message 2 of 15 , Dec 12, 2009
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        Al (again)... I've mentioned this before, but before you joined the forum. A couple of times I've notice an
        abrupt change in the Hum, and later checking charts from radio enthusiasts who receive the Schumann
        Resonances, noticed that at the same time I heard the change, there was an "event" recorded on their charts.
        Since the Schumann Resonances are in the same frequency range as human brain waves, do you think there could
        be a correlation?

        Carole


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "metaphid1" <al.porterfield@...>
        To: <humforum@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Saturday, December 12, 2009 5:30 AM
        Subject: HUM_FORUM: Re: My hum



        Dear Patty,

        Maybe, but I'm unconvinced. The following description of the microwave hearing effect comes from one of J. C.
        Lin's papers:

        "The sensation has been described as a click, buzz or chirp depending on the modulation characteristics of the
        impinging radiation."

        That simply doesn't match my experience, and it doesn't sound like the persistent hum described by many on
        this forum.


        Al



        > >Hi Al;
        > Since your trained in an area of neuroscience I'll try again.
        > You would be very interested in reading papers by James C. Lin and Henry Lai. They have done research into
        > Microwave Hearing and the effects caused by it.
        > James C. Lin is director of the ICNIRP.
        > You are not hallucinating - you have self tuning outer hair cells in your cochlea, that are working very
        > well.
        > John A. D'Andrea and DR Justesen have done some research on the cognitive effects from microwaves.
        >
        > It's very interesting research, know that many hear it too.
        > Patty
        >




        ------------------------------------

        Posting Guidelines:

        1. The orientation of this forum is scientific, with everything that implies. Reasoned and articulate
        criticism of ideas and theories is welcome.
        2. The following are not allowed: personal attacks, gratuitous profanity, "kook" posts, and supernatural
        explanations.
        3. Limit posts to those that are necessary and have substantive content. In general, no more than three per
        person per day.
        4. If you hear the Hum, please post your location at: www.frappr.com/humhearersYahoo! Groups Links
      • metaphid1
        Hi Maggie, Yes, hallucinations can go on for hours (or days, or weeks, or months) on end. However, I also suggested in my note that there may well be multiple
        Message 3 of 15 , Dec 13, 2009
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          Hi Maggie,

          Yes, hallucinations can go on for hours (or days, or weeks, or months) on end.

          However, I also suggested in my note that there may well be multiple sources of these pesky hums, and that we should not assume a uniform source for all of them. My point, in particular, was to suggest that people who hear a hum which no one else around them seems able to hear ought seriously to consider hallucination as a possibility. And again, by "hallucination," all I mean is a sensory experience without an appropriate sensory stimulus. I am NOT suggesting that "hallucination" is synonymous with "psychosis." Benign hallucinations of various sorts are fairly common (e.g., some psychologically well-functioning people hear instrumental music or opera singers all the time).

          Good luck with your hum.

          Al

          --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, "coatesmargaret" <coatesmargaret@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Al, I am pretty certain the hum I hear is external. Would a hallucination go on for hours on end?
          >
          > Two of my neighbours heard it and one could hum the same tone, +/- 41 or 82 Hz, which we discovered by matching it on the piano. My brother didn't hear it but felt the vibration as did a friend who visited.
          >
          > I share many of the features others mention, heard in one (left) ear, comes up through the bed when I lie on the left side, seems to come down from the air when I lie on the right, sounds like a diesel truck or a distant train or a low drone, sometimes has direction but usually doesn't. Worse at night but probably because of fewer distractions.
          >
          > I've had similar experiences of the hum intensifying exactly on the hour or half hour sometimes for several days in a row which suggests something on a time switch.
          >
          > Recently I found someone on a website who referred to the aggressive form of the hum.
          > When I moved house last year it was only a dozen or so kms away from the previous house, yet none of the painful physical sensations came with me. And the hum is now mostly quiet enough that I can ignore it to the extent that sometimes I'm not sure if I'm actually hearing it or not. A hum with an aggressive and non aggressive version might describe the differences in the way people hear it and in my case almost certainly relates to the differences in the two areas in many potential hum sources.
          >
          > Though I think the hum I hear is external I would agree there may be something in one's physiology that makes some people susceptible to it.
          >
          > Maggie NSW Australia
          >
        • Curry Cook
          al, nothing here seems to be that black and white.  in my case, my neighbor hears it, my family doesn t.  i didn t hear it for 5 months when i was living in
          Message 4 of 15 , Dec 13, 2009
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            al, nothing here seems to be that black and white.  in my case, my neighbor hears it, my family doesn't.  i didn't hear it for 5 months when i was living in illinois, then i did. there is one room in my house where i've never heard it. there doesn't seem to be any characteristic that is across the board for sure. we all seem to describe it in similar terms, diesel truck in the driveway, etc.  somebody mentioned that it seems to come up through the bed; i've heard it that way too, but not every time.  what somebody said about  physiology making some people more prone to hear it  makes sense to me.  do i want to believe that it's acoustic because then i don't have to worry about the state of my health or mental health?  maybe.  i do know that i worry less when i hear people having similar experiences to mine.


            From: metaphid1 <al.porterfield@...>
            To: humforum@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Sun, December 13, 2009 6:58:37 AM
            Subject: HUM_FORUM: Re: My hum

             

            Hi Maggie,

            Yes, hallucinations can go on for hours (or days, or weeks, or months) on end.

            However, I also suggested in my note that there may well be multiple sources of these pesky hums, and that we should not assume a uniform source for all of them. My point, in particular, was to suggest that people who hear a hum which no one else around them seems able to hear ought seriously to consider hallucination as a possibility. And again, by "hallucination, " all I mean is a sensory experience without an appropriate sensory stimulus. I am NOT suggesting that "hallucination" is synonymous with "psychosis." Benign hallucinations of various sorts are fairly common (e.g., some psychologically well-functioning people hear instrumental music or opera singers all the time).

            Good luck with your hum.

            Al

            --- In humforum@yahoogroup s.com, "coatesmargaret" <coatesmargaret@ ...> wrote:

            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Al, I am pretty certain the hum I hear is external. Would a hallucination go on for hours on end?
            >
            > Two of my neighbours heard it and one could hum the same tone, +/- 41 or 82 Hz, which we discovered by matching it on the piano. My brother didn't hear it but felt the vibration as did a friend who visited.
            >
            > I share many of the features others mention, heard in one (left) ear, comes up through the bed when I lie on the left side, seems to come down from the air when I lie on the right, sounds like a diesel truck or a distant train or a low drone, sometimes has direction but usually doesn't. Worse at night but probably because of fewer distractions.
            >
            > I've had similar experiences of the hum intensifying exactly on the hour or half hour sometimes for several days in a row which suggests something on a time switch.
            >
            > Recently I found someone on a website who referred to the aggressive form of the hum.
            > When I moved house last year it was only a dozen or so kms away from the previous house, yet none of the painful physical sensations came with me. And the hum is now mostly quiet enough that I can ignore it to the extent that sometimes I'm not sure if I'm actually hearing it or not. A hum with an aggressive and non aggressive version might describe the differences in the way people hear it and in my case almost certainly relates to the differences in the two areas in many potential hum sources.
            >
            > Though I think the hum I hear is external I would agree there may be something in one's physiology that makes some people susceptible to it.
            >
            > Maggie NSW Australia
            >


          • RG Dudley
            Patty: Could you post the references to the papers you mentioned, so we can find them, or are they already in the files on this forum? (I haven t had a chance
            Message 5 of 15 , Dec 14, 2009
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              Patty:
               
              Could you post the references to the papers you mentioned, so we can find them, or are they already in the files on this forum? (I haven't had a chance to look). I hadn't heard about hearing microwaves before.  Sound's pretty weird... they occur naturally (cosmic background radiation... very very weak) and for communication since the late 50s/early 60s.  


              From: humforum@yahoogroups.com [mailto:humforum@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of patty94@...
              Sent: Saturday, December 12, 2009 3:31 AM
              To: humforum@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: HUM_FORUM: Re: My hum

               



              --- In humforum@yahoogroup s.com, "metaphid1" <al.porterfield@ ...> wrote:

              >
              > Hi
              folks,
              >
              > I'm a newcomer to the group. I stumbled upon it while
              searching the internets for information on "The Hum." I have been hearing "a" hum off and on for several years now. Sometimes it is quite pronounced and bothersome (although not very--it does not interfere with my sleep, for example), lasting days at a time. Other times, it goes away for days or weeks. As is the case with many others on this group, my hum clearly seems to come from an unknown external source. I experience it exactly as do most others on this forum: Distant idling truck or heavy equipment, etc. It is as real to me as any other external sound.
              >
              > But I am a scientist (PhD clinical
              psychology; research and teaching in cognitive neuroscience) , and skeptical by nature; and I have become convinced that my hum is a hallucination of some sort. The evidence that leads me to this conclusion is pretty straightforward:
              >
              > 1. No one else in my family can hear my hum,
              even when it is quite intense. I have two teenage children who have excellent hearing (both can hear, for example, the high-frequency "mosquito" tone that most adults are unable to hear)--and neither kid can hear the hum. My wife's hearing is excellent--much better than my own--and she is unable to hear it.
              >
              > 2. I have excellent relative pitch, so I have been able to
              determine the dominant frequency of my hum by matching it to a pure sine wave from a variable frequency tone generation application that I found on the web. The pitch of my tone is in a range that should be clearly audible to anyone with normal hearing. It is not "ultrasound. " It is low frequency (about 40Hz, if I recall correctly), but it's not ultra-low frequency. Of course, sound is a funny thing. I could conceivably be hearing a higher frequency harmonic from an ultra-low frequency oscillation of some sort; but the point is, that harmonic is in a clearly audible range, yet no one else can hear it.
              >
              > 3.
              Through careful observation, I have noticed that my hum behaves differently than other natural low frequency sounds. For example, I hear it ONLY in quiet environments (usually in my own home). There are lots of natural low-frequency sounds of similar intensity that I can hear in relatively noisy environments- -the distant idling truck, for example, that many people use to describe their hums. Also, when I'm hearing the hum, I notice that it is momentarily suppressed by relatively low-intensity competing noises. I am hearing the hum at this moment--but ONLY when I stop typing on my keyboard. As soon as I start going clickety-click, the hum disappears-- although it rapidly rises to full intensity again if I momentarily stop typing. If, for comparison purposes, there were a large diesel truck idling somewhere in the neighborhood as I was typing this, I would expect to hear the sound of my typing ON TOP OF the background hum of the truck. That's not the way my hum works. It seems to fade when there is some noise in the foreground, and then rapidly fade back in when the noise goes away. This may be similar to what several recent posters have said about being able to make their hums disappear through facial movements (opening the mouth, squinting) and such. One thing such movements do is generate vibrations from muscle contraction that are transferred via bone conduction to the auditory canal and middle ear. Perhaps this "muscle sound" suppresses their internally-generate d hum in the same way that external sounds seem to banish my hum momentarily. Another thought: I mentioned that my hum, which can be fairly intense and annoying, doesn't interfere with my sleep. Long ago, I developed the habit of sleeping with a small fan running in my bedroom--summer and winter--just to generate a slight drone to mask street noises and such. I suspect that the sound of the fan also suppresses my internal hum. (Might be worth a try.)
              >
              > On balance, the evidence of my own
              experience simply does not support the idea that the hum that I hear is coming from an external source. I am hallucinating- -although my hallucination is relatively benign and not associated with any other signs of serious mental disorder (you'll have to take my word on this!). Or, my hum is some unusual form of tinnitus--perhaps a form that is relatively rare and not recognized as such by the audiology community. But it is NOT, I am convinced, from HARP, or cell phone towers, or geological dynamics, or nefarious governmental activity, or aliens, or whatever.
              >
              > Now, it is possible, perhaps even likely,
              that different members of this forum are hearing hums originating from different sources, and we make the mistake of assuming there must be a single explanation. I know that recordings exist of some hums; but that does not mean that ALL hums are external. (Incidentally, when I listen to the cell-phone tower recordings posted recently by greenhorn, I hear nothing that I would describe as a "hum," and certainly nothing that approaches the low-frequency hum that I hear). I simply wish to suggest that hallucination- -i.e., a sensory experience arising in the absence of a corresponding sensory stimulus--is worth entertaining as a hypothesis when one searches for an explanation for his/her hum. In particular, to those who assert, in no uncertain terms, that what they hear is NOT a hallucination- -even though no one else can hear what they are hearing--are not on sound evidential ground. That something sounds REAL to you is not proof that it originates outside your head.
              >
              >
              Regards,
              >
              > Al
              >Hi Al;
              Since your trained in an area of neuroscience I'll try again.
              You would be very interested in reading papers by James C. Lin and Henry Lai. They have done research into Microwave Hearing and the effects caused by it.
              James C. Lin is director of the ICNIRP.
              You are not hallucinating - you have self tuning outer hair cells in your cochlea, that are working very well.
              John A. D'Andrea and DR Justesen have done some research on the cognitive effects from microwaves.

              It's very interesting research, know that many hear it too.
              Patty

            • Donna Few
              Hi guys/gals, Microwaves occurring naturally and being connected with cosmic radiation, makes sense to me with regard to geophysical theory tossed around about
              Message 6 of 15 , Dec 18, 2009
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                Hi guys/gals,

                Microwaves occurring naturally and being connected with cosmic radiation, makes sense to me with regard to geophysical theory tossed around about the Hum.  People, like myself who experience high intensity impact from the Hum have complained about the pins and needles effect.  I in fact told family members prior to knowing about the hum that when hearing the noise in bed, I felt like radiation was shooting through my body. 

                Also, myself and others have mentioned a buzz, high frequency noise heard in conjunction with the low frequency hum.

                Donna

                --- On Mon, 12/14/09, RG Dudley <rgdudley@...> wrote:

                From: RG Dudley <rgdudley@...>
                Subject: RE: HUM_FORUM: Re: My hum
                To: humforum@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Monday, December 14, 2009, 4:11 PM



                Patty:
                 
                Could you post the references to the papers you mentioned, so we can find them, or are they already in the files on this forum? (I haven't had a chance to look). I hadn't heard about hearing microwaves before.  Sound's pretty weird... they occur naturally (cosmic background radiation... very very weak) and for communication since the late 50s/early 60s.  


                From: humforum@yahoogroups.com [mailto:humforum@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of patty94@...
                Sent: Saturday, December 12, 2009 3:31 AM
                To: humforum@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: HUM_FORUM: Re: My hum

                 



                --- In humforum@yahoogroup s.com, "metaphid1" <al.porterfield@ ...> wrote:
                >
                > Hi folks,
                >
                > I'm a newcomer to the group. I stumbled upon it while searching the internets for information on "The Hum." I have been hearing "a" hum off and on for several years now. Sometimes it is quite pronounced and bothersome (although not very--it does not interfere with my sleep, for example), lasting days at a time. Other times, it goes away for days or weeks. As is the case with many others on this group, my hum clearly seems to come from an unknown external source. I experience it exactly as do most others on this forum: Distant idling truck or heavy equipment, etc. It is as real to me as any other external sound.
                >
                > But I am a scientist (PhD clinical psychology; research and teaching in cognitive neuroscience) , and skeptical by nature; and I have become convinced that my hum is a hallucination of some sort. The evidence that leads me to this conclusion is pretty straightforward:
                >
                > 1. No one else in my family can hear my hum, even when it is quite intense. I have two teenage children who have excellent hearing (both can hear, for example, the high-frequency "mosquito" tone that most adults are unable to hear)--and neither kid can hear the hum. My wife's hearing is excellent--much better than my own--and she is unable to hear it.
                >
                > 2. I have excellent relative pitch, so I have been able to determine the dominant frequency of my hum by matching it to a pure sine wave from a variable frequency tone generation application that I found on the web. The pitch of my tone is in a range that should be clearly audible to anyone with normal hearing. It is not "ultrasound. " It is low frequency (about 40Hz, if I recall correctly), but it's not ultra-low frequency. Of course, sound is a funny thing. I could conceivably be hearing a higher frequency harmonic from an ultra-low frequency oscillation of some sort; but the point is, that harmonic is in a clearly audible range, yet no one else can hear it.
                >
                > 3. Through careful observation, I have noticed that my hum behaves differently than other natural low frequency sounds. For example, I hear it ONLY in quiet environments (usually in my own home). There are lots of natural low-frequency sounds of similar intensity that I can hear in relatively noisy environments- -the distant idling truck, for example, that many people use to describe their hums. Also, when I'm hearing the hum, I notice that it is momentarily suppressed by relatively low-intensity competing noises. I am hearing the hum at this moment--but ONLY when I stop typing on my keyboard. As soon as I start going clickety-click, the hum disappears-- although it rapidly rises to full intensity again if I momentarily stop typing. If, for comparison purposes, there were a large diesel truck idling somewhere in the neighborhood as I was typing this, I would expect to hear the sound of my typing ON TOP OF the background hum of the truck. That's not the way my hum works. It seems to fade when there is some noise in the foreground, and then rapidly fade back in when the noise goes away. This may be similar to what several recent posters have said about being able to make their hums disappear through facial movements (opening the mouth, squinting) and such. One thing such movements do is generate vibrations from muscle contraction that are transferred via bone conduction to the auditory canal and middle ear. Perhaps this "muscle sound" suppresses their internally-generate d hum in the same way that external sounds seem to banish my hum momentarily. Another thought: I mentioned that my hum, which can be fairly intense and annoying, doesn't interfere with my sleep. Long ago, I developed the habit of sleeping with a small fan running in my bedroom--summer and winter--just to generate a slight drone to mask street noises and such. I suspect that the sound of the fan also suppresses my internal hum. (Might be worth a try.)
                >
                > On balance, the evidence of my own experience simply does not support the idea that the hum that I hear is coming from an external source. I am hallucinating- -although my hallucination is relatively benign and not associated with any other signs of serious mental disorder (you'll have to take my word on this!). Or, my hum is some unusual form of tinnitus--perhaps a form that is relatively rare and not recognized as such by the audiology community. But it is NOT, I am convinced, from HARP, or cell phone towers, or geological dynamics, or nefarious governmental activity, or aliens, or whatever.
                >
                > Now, it is possible, perhaps even likely, that different members of this forum are hearing hums originating from different sources, and we make the mistake of assuming there must be a single explanation. I know that recordings exist of some hums; but that does not mean that ALL hums are external. (Incidentally, when I listen to the cell-phone tower recordings posted recently by greenhorn, I hear nothing that I would describe as a "hum," and certainly nothing that approaches the low-frequency hum that I hear). I simply wish to suggest that hallucination- -i.e., a sensory experience arising in the absence of a corresponding sensory stimulus--is worth entertaining as a hypothesis when one searches for an explanation for his/her hum. In particular, to those who assert, in no uncertain terms, that what they hear is NOT a hallucination- -even though no one else can hear what they are hearing--are not on sound evidential ground. That something sounds REAL to you is not proof that it originates outside your head.
                >
                > Regards,
                >
                > Al
                >Hi Al;
                Since your trained in an area of neuroscience I'll try again.
                You would be very interested in reading papers by James C. Lin and Henry Lai. They have done research into Microwave Hearing and the effects caused by it.
                James C. Lin is director of the ICNIRP.
                You are not hallucinating - you have self tuning outer hair cells in your cochlea, that are working very well.
                John A. D'Andrea and DR Justesen have done some research on the cognitive effects from microwaves.

                It's very interesting research, know that many hear it too.
                Patty




              • patty94@ymail.com
                ... Hearing of Microwaves is the most excepted side effect of all of the new telecommunications. James C. Lins paper is called; Health Aspects of Wireless
                Message 7 of 15 , Dec 18, 2009
                • 0 Attachment
                  --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, RG Dudley <rgdudley@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Patty:
                  >
                  > Could you post the references to the papers you mentioned, so we can find
                  > them, or are they already in the files on this forum? (I haven't had a
                  > chance to look). I hadn't heard about hearing microwaves before. Sound's
                  > pretty weird... they occur naturally (cosmic background radiation... very
                  > very weak) and for communication since the late 50s/early 60s.
                  >
                  >Hi, the references are located and associated with the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Piscataway, New Jersey and Bioelectromagnetics a science magazine. All my information was gathered in google. I'm not a fluent computer user so I can't provide links, but the information is available usually in google scholar.
                  Hearing of Microwaves is the most excepted side effect of all of the new telecommunications.
                  James C. Lins paper is called; Health Aspects of Wireless Communication: Auditory Perception of Microwaves - Hearing Microwaves.

                  Henry Lai : Neurological Effects of Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Radiation, Bioelectromagnetics Research Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle

                  I know most have not heard of this effect, that is a part of the problem, you can read back in the guidelines from the IEEE and ICNIRP and read about the special precautions from the technological scientist when this technology was handed over to be used as an industry.

                  Probably Allan Freys papers are the most easily accessible.

                  I go into G. Scolar and use pulsed electromagnetics, I started with only knowing that I could not block the sound out with earplugs, and I assumed I was not crazy. Then I discovered that it was my Cochlea not my outer ear that I was hearing it with, I know it is freaky but true.
                  Patty _____
                  >
                  > From: humforum@yahoogroups.com [mailto:humforum@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                  > Of patty94@...
                  > Sent: Saturday, December 12, 2009 3:31 AM
                  > To: humforum@yahoogroups.com
                  > Subject: HUM_FORUM: Re: My hum
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In humforum@yahoogroup <mailto:humforum%40yahoogroups.com> s.com,
                  > "metaphid1" <al.porterfield@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Hi folks,
                  > >
                  > > I'm a newcomer to the group. I stumbled upon it while searching the
                  > internets for information on "The Hum." I have been hearing "a" hum off and
                  > on for several years now. Sometimes it is quite pronounced and bothersome
                  > (although not very--it does not interfere with my sleep, for example),
                  > lasting days at a time. Other times, it goes away for days or weeks. As is
                  > the case with many others on this group, my hum clearly seems to come from
                  > an unknown external source. I experience it exactly as do most others on
                  > this forum: Distant idling truck or heavy equipment, etc. It is as real to
                  > me as any other external sound.
                  > >
                  > > But I am a scientist (PhD clinical psychology; research and teaching in
                  > cognitive neuroscience), and skeptical by nature; and I have become
                  > convinced that my hum is a hallucination of some sort. The evidence that
                  > leads me to this conclusion is pretty straightforward:
                  > >
                  > > 1. No one else in my family can hear my hum, even when it is quite
                  > intense. I have two teenage children who have excellent hearing (both can
                  > hear, for example, the high-frequency "mosquito" tone that most adults are
                  > unable to hear)--and neither kid can hear the hum. My wife's hearing is
                  > excellent--much better than my own--and she is unable to hear it.
                  > >
                  > > 2. I have excellent relative pitch, so I have been able to determine the
                  > dominant frequency of my hum by matching it to a pure sine wave from a
                  > variable frequency tone generation application that I found on the web. The
                  > pitch of my tone is in a range that should be clearly audible to anyone with
                  > normal hearing. It is not "ultrasound." It is low frequency (about 40Hz, if
                  > I recall correctly), but it's not ultra-low frequency. Of course, sound is a
                  > funny thing. I could conceivably be hearing a higher frequency harmonic from
                  > an ultra-low frequency oscillation of some sort; but the point is, that
                  > harmonic is in a clearly audible range, yet no one else can hear it.
                  > >
                  > > 3. Through careful observation, I have noticed that my hum behaves
                  > differently than other natural low frequency sounds. For example, I hear it
                  > ONLY in quiet environments (usually in my own home). There are lots of
                  > natural low-frequency sounds of similar intensity that I can hear in
                  > relatively noisy environments--the distant idling truck, for example, that
                  > many people use to describe their hums. Also, when I'm hearing the hum, I
                  > notice that it is momentarily suppressed by relatively low-intensity
                  > competing noises. I am hearing the hum at this moment--but ONLY when I stop
                  > typing on my keyboard. As soon as I start going clickety-click, the hum
                  > disappears--although it rapidly rises to full intensity again if I
                  > momentarily stop typing. If, for comparison purposes, there were a large
                  > diesel truck idling somewhere in the neighborhood as I was typing this, I
                  > would expect to hear the sound of my typing ON TOP OF the background hum of
                  > the truck. That's not the way my hum works. It seems to fade when there is
                  > some noise in the foreground, and then rapidly fade back in when the noise
                  > goes away. This may be similar to what several recent posters have said
                  > about being able to make their hums disappear through facial movements
                  > (opening the mouth, squinting) and such. One thing such movements do is
                  > generate vibrations from muscle contraction that are transferred via bone
                  > conduction to the auditory canal and middle ear. Perhaps this "muscle sound"
                  > suppresses their internally-generated hum in the same way that external
                  > sounds seem to banish my hum momentarily. Another thought: I mentioned that
                  > my hum, which can be fairly intense and annoying, doesn't interfere with my
                  > sleep. Long ago, I developed the habit of sleeping with a small fan running
                  > in my bedroom--summer and winter--just to generate a slight drone to mask
                  > street noises and such. I suspect that the sound of the fan also suppresses
                  > my internal hum. (Might be worth a try.)
                  > >
                  > > On balance, the evidence of my own experience simply does not support the
                  > idea that the hum that I hear is coming from an external source. I am
                  > hallucinating--although my hallucination is relatively benign and not
                  > associated with any other signs of serious mental disorder (you'll have to
                  > take my word on this!). Or, my hum is some unusual form of tinnitus--perhaps
                  > a form that is relatively rare and not recognized as such by the audiology
                  > community. But it is NOT, I am convinced, from HARP, or cell phone towers,
                  > or geological dynamics, or nefarious governmental activity, or aliens, or
                  > whatever.
                  > >
                  > > Now, it is possible, perhaps even likely, that different members of this
                  > forum are hearing hums originating from different sources, and we make the
                  > mistake of assuming there must be a single explanation. I know that
                  > recordings exist of some hums; but that does not mean that ALL hums are
                  > external. (Incidentally, when I listen to the cell-phone tower recordings
                  > posted recently by greenhorn, I hear nothing that I would describe as a
                  > "hum," and certainly nothing that approaches the low-frequency hum that I
                  > hear). I simply wish to suggest that hallucination--i.e., a sensory
                  > experience arising in the absence of a corresponding sensory stimulus--is
                  > worth entertaining as a hypothesis when one searches for an explanation for
                  > his/her hum. In particular, to those who assert, in no uncertain terms, that
                  > what they hear is NOT a hallucination--even though no one else can hear what
                  > they are hearing--are not on sound evidential ground. That something sounds
                  > REAL to you is not proof that it originates outside your head.
                  > >
                  > > Regards,
                  > >
                  > > Al
                  > >Hi Al;
                  > Since your trained in an area of neuroscience I'll try again.
                  > You would be very interested in reading papers by James C. Lin and Henry
                  > Lai. They have done research into Microwave Hearing and the effects caused
                  > by it.
                  > James C. Lin is director of the ICNIRP.
                  > You are not hallucinating - you have self tuning outer hair cells in your
                  > cochlea, that are working very well.
                  > John A. D'Andrea and DR Justesen have done some research on the cognitive
                  > effects from microwaves.
                  >
                  > It's very interesting research, know that many hear it too.
                  > Patty
                  >
                • patty94@ymail.com
                  ... Geophysical magnetics I think are not linear, therefore not as harmful to the human body. Telecommunications are linear and forced therefore causing
                  Message 8 of 15 , Dec 19, 2009
                  • 0 Attachment
                    --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, "patty94@..." <patty94@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, RG Dudley <rgdudley@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Patty:
                    > >
                    > > Could you post the references to the papers you mentioned, so we can find
                    > > them, or are they already in the files on this forum? (I haven't had a
                    > > chance to look). I hadn't heard about hearing microwaves before. Sound's
                    > > pretty weird... they occur naturally (cosmic background radiation... very
                    > > very weak) and for communication since the late 50s/early 60s.
                    > >
                    > >Hi, the references are located and associated with the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Piscataway, New Jersey and Bioelectromagnetics a science magazine. All my information was gathered in google. I'm not a fluent computer user so I can't provide links, but the information is available usually in google scholar.
                    > Hearing of Microwaves is the most excepted side effect of all of the new telecommunications.
                    > James C. Lins paper is called; Health Aspects of Wireless Communication: Auditory Perception of Microwaves - Hearing Microwaves.
                    >
                    > Henry Lai : Neurological Effects of Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Radiation, Bioelectromagnetics Research Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle
                    >
                    > I know most have not heard of this effect, that is a part of the problem, you can read back in the guidelines from the IEEE and ICNIRP and read about the special precautions from the technological scientist when this technology was handed over to be used as an industry.
                    >
                    > Probably Allan Freys papers are the most easily accessible.
                    >
                    > I go into G. Scolar and use pulsed electromagnetics, I started with only knowing that I could not block the sound out with earplugs, and I assumed I was not crazy. Then I discovered that it was my Cochlea not my outer ear that I was hearing it with, I know it is freaky but true.
                    > Patty _____
                    > >I thought I should say that it's not of my own volition that I have gone to this course of study. I talked with radiation protection scientist, a spectrum management reperesentative and a scientific research paper writer that told me he had been writting for the community for a long time, he inspired me to look into the hearing of microwaves with the cochlea - I don't know how this has been missed. The only thing I have seen so far is the hand off of info from science to industry, reminds me of the A Bomb for some reason.
                    Geophysical magnetics I think are not linear, therefore not as harmful to the human body. Telecommunications are linear and forced therefore causing stress on cells, rods in the eyes and elongated outer hair cells which also have a very quick reaction - see the Howard Hughes Institute web site, research into deafness they give a very good explaination on the condition of the respond time of the outer hair cells they are alot faster than they though.
                    Patty
                    > > From: humforum@yahoogroups.com [mailto:humforum@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                    > > Of patty94@
                    > > Sent: Saturday, December 12, 2009 3:31 AM
                    > > To: humforum@yahoogroups.com
                    > > Subject: HUM_FORUM: Re: My hum
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > --- In humforum@yahoogroup <mailto:humforum%40yahoogroups.com> s.com,
                    > > "metaphid1" <al.porterfield@> wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > Hi folks,
                    > > >
                    > > > I'm a newcomer to the group. I stumbled upon it while searching the
                    > > internets for information on "The Hum." I have been hearing "a" hum off and
                    > > on for several years now. Sometimes it is quite pronounced and bothersome
                    > > (although not very--it does not interfere with my sleep, for example),
                    > > lasting days at a time. Other times, it goes away for days or weeks. As is
                    > > the case with many others on this group, my hum clearly seems to come from
                    > > an unknown external source. I experience it exactly as do most others on
                    > > this forum: Distant idling truck or heavy equipment, etc. It is as real to
                    > > me as any other external sound.
                    > > >
                    > > > But I am a scientist (PhD clinical psychology; research and teaching in
                    > > cognitive neuroscience), and skeptical by nature; and I have become
                    > > convinced that my hum is a hallucination of some sort. The evidence that
                    > > leads me to this conclusion is pretty straightforward:
                    > > >
                    > > > 1. No one else in my family can hear my hum, even when it is quite
                    > > intense. I have two teenage children who have excellent hearing (both can
                    > > hear, for example, the high-frequency "mosquito" tone that most adults are
                    > > unable to hear)--and neither kid can hear the hum. My wife's hearing is
                    > > excellent--much better than my own--and she is unable to hear it.
                    > > >
                    > > > 2. I have excellent relative pitch, so I have been able to determine the
                    > > dominant frequency of my hum by matching it to a pure sine wave from a
                    > > variable frequency tone generation application that I found on the web. The
                    > > pitch of my tone is in a range that should be clearly audible to anyone with
                    > > normal hearing. It is not "ultrasound." It is low frequency (about 40Hz, if
                    > > I recall correctly), but it's not ultra-low frequency. Of course, sound is a
                    > > funny thing. I could conceivably be hearing a higher frequency harmonic from
                    > > an ultra-low frequency oscillation of some sort; but the point is, that
                    > > harmonic is in a clearly audible range, yet no one else can hear it.
                    > > >
                    > > > 3. Through careful observation, I have noticed that my hum behaves
                    > > differently than other natural low frequency sounds. For example, I hear it
                    > > ONLY in quiet environments (usually in my own home). There are lots of
                    > > natural low-frequency sounds of similar intensity that I can hear in
                    > > relatively noisy environments--the distant idling truck, for example, that
                    > > many people use to describe their hums. Also, when I'm hearing the hum, I
                    > > notice that it is momentarily suppressed by relatively low-intensity
                    > > competing noises. I am hearing the hum at this moment--but ONLY when I stop
                    > > typing on my keyboard. As soon as I start going clickety-click, the hum
                    > > disappears--although it rapidly rises to full intensity again if I
                    > > momentarily stop typing. If, for comparison purposes, there were a large
                    > > diesel truck idling somewhere in the neighborhood as I was typing this, I
                    > > would expect to hear the sound of my typing ON TOP OF the background hum of
                    > > the truck. That's not the way my hum works. It seems to fade when there is
                    > > some noise in the foreground, and then rapidly fade back in when the noise
                    > > goes away. This may be similar to what several recent posters have said
                    > > about being able to make their hums disappear through facial movements
                    > > (opening the mouth, squinting) and such. One thing such movements do is
                    > > generate vibrations from muscle contraction that are transferred via bone
                    > > conduction to the auditory canal and middle ear. Perhaps this "muscle sound"
                    > > suppresses their internally-generated hum in the same way that external
                    > > sounds seem to banish my hum momentarily. Another thought: I mentioned that
                    > > my hum, which can be fairly intense and annoying, doesn't interfere with my
                    > > sleep. Long ago, I developed the habit of sleeping with a small fan running
                    > > in my bedroom--summer and winter--just to generate a slight drone to mask
                    > > street noises and such. I suspect that the sound of the fan also suppresses
                    > > my internal hum. (Might be worth a try.)
                    > > >
                    > > > On balance, the evidence of my own experience simply does not support the
                    > > idea that the hum that I hear is coming from an external source. I am
                    > > hallucinating--although my hallucination is relatively benign and not
                    > > associated with any other signs of serious mental disorder (you'll have to
                    > > take my word on this!). Or, my hum is some unusual form of tinnitus--perhaps
                    > > a form that is relatively rare and not recognized as such by the audiology
                    > > community. But it is NOT, I am convinced, from HARP, or cell phone towers,
                    > > or geological dynamics, or nefarious governmental activity, or aliens, or
                    > > whatever.
                    > > >
                    > > > Now, it is possible, perhaps even likely, that different members of this
                    > > forum are hearing hums originating from different sources, and we make the
                    > > mistake of assuming there must be a single explanation. I know that
                    > > recordings exist of some hums; but that does not mean that ALL hums are
                    > > external. (Incidentally, when I listen to the cell-phone tower recordings
                    > > posted recently by greenhorn, I hear nothing that I would describe as a
                    > > "hum," and certainly nothing that approaches the low-frequency hum that I
                    > > hear). I simply wish to suggest that hallucination--i.e., a sensory
                    > > experience arising in the absence of a corresponding sensory stimulus--is
                    > > worth entertaining as a hypothesis when one searches for an explanation for
                    > > his/her hum. In particular, to those who assert, in no uncertain terms, that
                    > > what they hear is NOT a hallucination--even though no one else can hear what
                    > > they are hearing--are not on sound evidential ground. That something sounds
                    > > REAL to you is not proof that it originates outside your head.
                    > > >
                    > > > Regards,
                    > > >
                    > > > Al
                    > > >Hi Al;
                    > > Since your trained in an area of neuroscience I'll try again.
                    > > You would be very interested in reading papers by James C. Lin and Henry
                    > > Lai. They have done research into Microwave Hearing and the effects caused
                    > > by it.
                    > > James C. Lin is director of the ICNIRP.
                    > > You are not hallucinating - you have self tuning outer hair cells in your
                    > > cochlea, that are working very well.
                    > > John A. D'Andrea and DR Justesen have done some research on the cognitive
                    > > effects from microwaves.
                    > >
                    > > It's very interesting research, know that many hear it too.
                    > > Patty
                    > >
                    >
                  • Donna Few
                    Thanks RG, For taking the time to note these references.  I too have read some of them.  Your note seems to clarify something for me, which I suppose the
                    Message 9 of 15 , Dec 26, 2009
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Thanks RG,

                      For taking the time to note these references.  I too have read some of them.  Your note seems to clarify something for me, which I suppose the research indicates; that is if and when microwave hearing effect occurs, it is the inner ear (cochlea) that is activated/hears the energy waves.  Is this correct?

                      --- On Fri, 12/18/09, patty94@... <patty94@...> wrote:

                      From: patty94@... <patty94@...>
                      Subject: HUM_FORUM: Re: My hum
                      To: humforum@yahoogroups.com
                      Date: Friday, December 18, 2009, 9:35 PM



                      --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, RG Dudley <rgdudley@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Patty:

                      > Could you post the references to the papers you mentioned, so we can find
                      > them, or are they already in the files on this forum? (I haven't had a
                      > chance to look). I hadn't heard about hearing microwaves before.  Sound's
                      > pretty weird... they occur naturally (cosmic background radiation... very
                      > very weak) and for communication since the late 50s/early 60s.   
                      >
                      >Hi, the references are located and associated with the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Piscataway, New Jersey and Bioelectromagnetics a science magazine.  All my information was gathered in google.  I'm not a fluent computer user so I can't provide links, but the information is available usually in google scholar.
                      Hearing of Microwaves is the most excepted side effect of all of the new telecommunications.
                      James C. Lins paper is called;  Health Aspects of Wireless Communication:  Auditory Perception of Microwaves - Hearing Microwaves.

                      Henry Lai :  Neurological Effects of Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Radiation, Bioelectromagnetics Research Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle

                      I know most have not heard of this effect, that is a part of the problem, you can read back in the guidelines from the IEEE and ICNIRP and read about the special precautions from the technological scientist when this technology was handed over to be used as an industry. 

                      Probably Allan Freys papers are the most easily accessible.

                      I go into G. Scolar and use pulsed electromagnetics, I started with only knowing that I could not block the sound out with earplugs, and I assumed I was not crazy.  Then I discovered that it was my Cochlea not my outer ear that I was hearing it with, I know it is freaky but true. 
                      Patty   _____ 
                      >
                      > From: humforum@yahoogroups.com [mailto:humforum@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                      > Of patty94@...
                      > Sent: Saturday, December 12, 2009 3:31 AM
                      > To: humforum@yahoogroups.com
                      > Subject: HUM_FORUM: Re: My hum
                      >
                      >
                      >   
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > --- In humforum@yahoogroup <mailto:humforum%40yahoogroups.com> s.com,
                      > "metaphid1" <al.porterfield@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Hi folks,
                      > >
                      > > I'm a newcomer to the group. I stumbled upon it while searching the
                      > internets for information on "The Hum." I have been hearing "a" hum off and
                      > on for several years now. Sometimes it is quite pronounced and bothersome
                      > (although not very--it does not interfere with my sleep, for example),
                      > lasting days at a time. Other times, it goes away for days or weeks. As is
                      > the case with many others on this group, my hum clearly seems to come from
                      > an unknown external source. I experience it exactly as do most others on
                      > this forum: Distant idling truck or heavy equipment, etc. It is as real to
                      > me as any other external sound.
                      > >
                      > > But I am a scientist (PhD clinical psychology; research and teaching in
                      > cognitive neuroscience), and skeptical by nature; and I have become
                      > convinced that my hum is a hallucination of some sort. The evidence that
                      > leads me to this conclusion is pretty straightforward:
                      > >
                      > > 1. No one else in my family can hear my hum, even when it is quite
                      > intense. I have two teenage children who have excellent hearing (both can
                      > hear, for example, the high-frequency "mosquito" tone that most adults are
                      > unable to hear)--and neither kid can hear the hum. My wife's hearing is
                      > excellent--much better than my own--and she is unable to hear it.
                      > >
                      > > 2. I have excellent relative pitch, so I have been able to determine the
                      > dominant frequency of my hum by matching it to a pure sine wave from a
                      > variable frequency tone generation application that I found on the web. The
                      > pitch of my tone is in a range that should be clearly audible to anyone with
                      > normal hearing. It is not "ultrasound." It is low frequency (about 40Hz, if
                      > I recall correctly), but it's not ultra-low frequency. Of course, sound is a
                      > funny thing. I could conceivably be hearing a higher frequency harmonic from
                      > an ultra-low frequency oscillation of some sort; but the point is, that
                      > harmonic is in a clearly audible range, yet no one else can hear it.
                      > >
                      > > 3. Through careful observation, I have noticed that my hum behaves
                      > differently than other natural low frequency sounds. For example, I hear it
                      > ONLY in quiet environments (usually in my own home). There are lots of
                      > natural low-frequency sounds of similar intensity that I can hear in
                      > relatively noisy environments--the distant idling truck, for example, that
                      > many people use to describe their hums. Also, when I'm hearing the hum, I
                      > notice that it is momentarily suppressed by relatively low-intensity
                      > competing noises. I am hearing the hum at this moment--but ONLY when I stop
                      > typing on my keyboard. As soon as I start going clickety-click, the hum
                      > disappears--although it rapidly rises to full intensity again if I
                      > momentarily stop typing. If, for comparison purposes, there were a large
                      > diesel truck idling somewhere in the neighborhood as I was typing this, I
                      > would expect to hear the sound of my typing ON TOP OF the background hum of
                      > the truck. That's not the way my hum works. It seems to fade when there is
                      > some noise in the foreground, and then rapidly fade back in when the noise
                      > goes away. This may be similar to what several recent posters have said
                      > about being able to make their hums disappear through facial movements
                      > (opening the mouth, squinting) and such. One thing such movements do is
                      > generate vibrations from muscle contraction that are transferred via bone
                      > conduction to the auditory canal and middle ear. Perhaps this "muscle sound"
                      > suppresses their internally-generated hum in the same way that external
                      > sounds seem to banish my hum momentarily. Another thought: I mentioned that
                      > my hum, which can be fairly intense and annoying, doesn't interfere with my
                      > sleep. Long ago, I developed the habit of sleeping with a small fan running
                      > in my bedroom--summer and winter--just to generate a slight drone to mask
                      > street noises and such. I suspect that the sound of the fan also suppresses
                      > my internal hum. (Might be worth a try.)
                      > >
                      > > On balance, the evidence of my own experience simply does not support the
                      > idea that the hum that I hear is coming from an external source. I am
                      > hallucinating--although my hallucination is relatively benign and not
                      > associated with any other signs of serious mental disorder (you'll have to
                      > take my word on this!). Or, my hum is some unusual form of tinnitus--perhaps
                      > a form that is relatively rare and not recognized as such by the audiology
                      > community. But it is NOT, I am convinced, from HARP, or cell phone towers,
                      > or geological dynamics, or nefarious governmental activity, or aliens, or
                      > whatever.
                      > >
                      > > Now, it is possible, perhaps even likely, that different members of this
                      > forum are hearing hums originating from different sources, and we make the
                      > mistake of assuming there must be a single explanation. I know that
                      > recordings exist of some hums; but that does not mean that ALL hums are
                      > external. (Incidentally, when I listen to the cell-phone tower recordings
                      > posted recently by greenhorn, I hear nothing that I would describe as a
                      > "hum," and certainly nothing that approaches the low-frequency hum that I
                      > hear). I simply wish to suggest that hallucination--i.e., a sensory
                      > experience arising in the absence of a corresponding sensory stimulus--is
                      > worth entertaining as a hypothesis when one searches for an explanation for
                      > his/her hum. In particular, to those who assert, in no uncertain terms, that
                      > what they hear is NOT a hallucination--even though no one else can hear what
                      > they are hearing--are not on sound evidential ground. That something sounds
                      > REAL to you is not proof that it originates outside your head.
                      > >
                      > > Regards,
                      > >
                      > > Al
                      > >Hi Al;
                      > Since your trained in an area of neuroscience I'll try again.
                      > You would be very interested in reading papers by James C. Lin and Henry
                      > Lai. They have done research into Microwave Hearing and the effects caused
                      > by it.
                      > James C. Lin is director of the ICNIRP.
                      > You are not hallucinating - you have self tuning outer hair cells in your
                      > cochlea, that are working very well.
                      > John A. D'Andrea and DR Justesen have done some research on the cognitive
                      > effects from microwaves.
                      >
                      > It's very interesting research, know that many hear it too.
                      > Patty
                      >




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