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Re: HUM_FORUM: Importance of topography or no ? (Was Re: HAARP transmissins)

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  • Bill Curry
    Janyl, Dr. Rossen just reminded me that the acoustician in the UK that I mentioned is Dr Geoff Leventhall. Regards, Bill Curry Retired Physicist and Theatre
    Message 1 of 11 , Mar 29, 2009
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      Janyl, Dr. Rossen just reminded me that the acoustician in the UK that I mentioned is Dr Geoff Leventhall.
       
      Regards, Bill Curry
      Retired Physicist and
      Theatre Organist wannabe (member of ATOS)
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Sunday, March 29, 2009 12:31 AM
      Subject: Re: HUM_FORUM: Importance of topography or no ? (Was Re: HAARP transmissins)

      Janyl,
       
          The fellow named Geoffrey to whom I referred is an acoustical scientist who lives in England.  I have forgotten his last name.
       
      Regards, Bill
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Saturday, March 28, 2009 7:24 PM
      Subject: Re: HUM_FORUM: Importance of topography or no ? (Was Re: HAARP transmissins)

      Hello Bill, I think it's certainly possible for topography to play a part in how the Hum, shall I say, "travels" from unknown point to the hearer.
      In what we've experienced, however, even as I am open to many theories myself, I'd only be able to give perhaps a partial nod to the topography explanation. I think that the topography "aids" the Hum to travel in certain ways, but I also think that sound bouncing off man-made structures to be a part of the explanation.
      I am, I suppose best termed at the least, a semi-professional musician, one who has played at every kind of "hall" or performance locale (including the waterfront in San Francisco), and although I do not possess any degree or similar, I know that sound is a dynamic force which doesn't always play by the rules, so to speak.
      And just as if someone is in a rocky canyon, sound will bounce, as an example....but then again, I am in a Pocosin forest, and sound bounces around unbelievably as well. I think that structures, trees, other things evident in a zone, can have just as much effect as the ground. A good example of that, in Southern California, before sound barrier walls were built, trees would be planted to absorb traffic noise.
      So in a dynamic environment, there are so many factors, and I think that is what makes "diagnosing" the Hum more complicated.
       
      Geoff...are you referring to the gent with the nz (New Zealand) email who prefers the theory of personal tinnitus?
       
      Personally, I think it would be great if more Hum cases could be examined, sort of in a way like the Kokomo report, though most people, including myself, could not afford hiring a firm or individuals to examine the problem further.
       
      I wish I had the scientific expertise, but even then, people prefer evidence they can quantify on some sort of measuring device, from what I've found dealing with our Hum here.
      Sincerely, Janyl :)

      --- On Mon, 3/23/09, Bill Curry <bpcurry@worldnet. att.net> wrote:

      From: Bill Curry <bpcurry@worldnet. att.net>
      Subject: HUM_FORUM: Importance of topography or no ? (Was Re: HAARP transmissins)
      To: humforum@yahoogroup s.com
      Date: Monday, March 23, 2009, 12:19 PM

      Janyl,
       
          One thing I am curious about is how much the topography of the land may be significant.  Kokomo, IN is, broadly speaking, in the Wabash Valley, if I remember correctly.  I have forgotten precisely where London, KY is.  Is it close to the Cumberland Gap region.  My (probably incorrect) recollection from years ago is that the Sequatchie Valley crosses through Tennessee from the Cumberland Gap region all the way down to Georgia.
       
          Why should topography be important?  I can think of two possibilities:  1) if the Hum is of electromagnetic origin, the mineral content of the soil may be different from other regions.  If the mineral content is different, probably the conductivity of the ground will be different, also.  This affects the way electromagnetic waves propagate over the ground.  2) If the Hum is of either acoustic or infrasound origin, the propagation of sound waves along the ground might be affected because of the microscale terrain structure or propagation of of acoustic or infrasound waves through the air, since air pressure distribution is affected by gross features of the topography.  I am not an acoustician, so I hope that someone who is will comment on this.  We used to have a person on the list whose name was Geoff who had a PhD in acoustics (I have forgotten his surname, but I think he was from the United Kingdom).
       
      Regards, Bill Curry
      Retired Physicist and
      Theatre Organist wannabe
       
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Monday, March 23, 2009 1:52 AM
      Subject: Re: HUM_FORUM: Re: HAARP Transmissions

      Hello Bill and all, does it count if my daughter and I heard the Hum in Kentucky, specifically London? After all, it's kind of "over the mountain and up the road" from Tennessee, and I'm being serious saying this too.
      Sincerely, Janyl in Eastern NC :)

      --- On Sun, 3/22/09, Bill Curry <bpcurry@worldnet. att.net> wrote:

      From: Bill Curry <bpcurry@worldnet. att.net>
      Subject: Re: HUM_FORUM: Re: HAARP Transmissions
      To: humforum@yahoogroup s.com
      Date: Sunday, March 22, 2009, 7:25 PM

      Kir,
       
          Please don't do anything to damage your hearing.  If the Hum turns out to be the result of electromagnetic deposition of energy in your brain, damaging your hearing probably won't get rid of the Hum.  Dr. Alan Frey, the first scentist to undertake a thorough investigation of microwave hearing in the early 1960's found that even some people with some degree of deafness could "hear" pulsed microwaves under some conditions.  One pulse produced a click in the observers hearing; a series of clicks was perceived as a tone.  My wife and I made measurements on possible electromagnetic aspects of the Kokomo Hum under a subcontract from Acentech, Inc., the Cambridge Massachusetts company that made acoustic measurements for the Kokomo City council.  Our report is in the archives of this Forum.  Apparently, for microwave hearing to be perceived as sound, some ability to hear high frequency sounds is required.
       
          Incidentally, I am a former Tennessean.  Now, I live in the suburban Chicago area.  You are the only Hum hearer that I am aware of (on this Forum) who lives in Tennessee.  Am I wrong? I do not hear/feel the Hum, myself, but I have done extensive research on this phenomenon and also on the response of people who are electromagnetically hypersensitive to weak RF signals.  People who have chemical sensitivity, electrosensivity, Hum sensitivity, etc. usually represent a few % of the population at large.  This is the primary reason that you folks find it so hard to get the public at large to take the pain you perceive seriously.  In at least the case of electrosensitivy and chemical sensitivity there likely is a connection, an it wouldn't surprise me if there was found to be a connection also to Hum sensitivity.
       
      Regards, Bill Curry
      Retired Physicist and
      Theatre Organist wannabe
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Sunday, March 22, 2009 11:45 AM
      Subject: HUM_FORUM: Re: HAARP Transmissions

      Hi, Geoff--I believe I already know where your opinion lies in this, having read previous posts. I will say that (1) The only real stress in my life is a direct result of hearing the Hum and (2) While it would be nice to know what the cause is, at this point, I am primarily looking for a "fix."

      If I actually find a doctor who will discuss the possibilities, I will definitely let y'all know. I am not looking for a doctor who has a hypothesis or conclusion about the cause, just the treatment for me.

      Kir in Tennessee

      (The following was gently trimmed...)
      >
      > PLEASE tell us what his conclusion is. Your obvious extreme stress tells me
      > something about the likely cause, as you have inadvertently already alluded
      > to.

      > geoff







    • Geoff Wood
      ... Yes, sounds like the same sort of thing. Was on coping with noise ( applies equally to Hum, tinnitus, or other unavoidable noise) www.copingwithnoise.org
      Message 2 of 11 , Mar 31, 2009
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        coatesmargaret wrote:
        > Geoff I'd be interested to know if it is a similar program to the one
        > he began with 10 participants in 2007 or 2008 on managing the hum by
        > using cognitive behavioural techniques? Maggie

        Yes, sounds like the same sort of thing. Was on coping with noise ( applies
        equally to Hum, tinnitus, or other unavoidable noise)

        www.copingwithnoise.org

        cheers

        geoff
      • janyl humphrey
        Hello Maggie, Thanks for the link. I wasn t looking for him however. He has a different approach than I was thinking of. Sincerely, Janyl :)
        Message 3 of 11 , Apr 1, 2009
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          Hello Maggie, Thanks for the link. I wasn't looking for him however. He has a different approach than I was thinking of.
          Sincerely, Janyl :)

          --- On Tue, 3/31/09, coatesmargaret <coatesmargaret@...> wrote:

          > From: coatesmargaret <coatesmargaret@...>
          > Subject: HUM_FORUM: Importance of topography or no ? (Was Re: HAARP transmissins)
          > To: humforum@yahoogroups.com
          > Date: Tuesday, March 31, 2009, 3:42 PM
          > Hey Janyl,
          >
          > It's Geoff Leventhall you're looking
          > for.   Most of what I've learned and
          > understand of acoustic sound comes from this 90 odd page
          > report he compiled in 2003 for the City of London.
          >
          > http://www.defra.gov.uk/environment/noise/research/lowfrequency/
          >
          > Regards Maggie
          >
          >
          > --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com,
          > janyl humphrey <hyperion_nc@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > Hello Bill, I wish that we Hum sufferers in various
          > locales could "enlist" such people as this Geoff from
          > England you mentioned.
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Posting Guidelines:
          >
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          > everything that implies.  Reasoned and articulate
          > criticism of ideas and theories is welcome.
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          > 4.  If you hear the Hum, please post your location
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