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Re: HUM_FORUM: New to the Group

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  • Chip Johnson
    Hi Tom, Thanks for reply and comments. You have got me thinking about many aspects of the Hum. On the idea of recording the Hum--a tough challenge due to its
    Message 1 of 11 , Oct 11, 2008
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      Hi Tom,

      Thanks for reply and comments.  You have got me thinking about many aspects of the Hum. On the idea of recording the Hum--a tough challenge due to its low volume over background noise.  I actually tried to record it once early this spring and got no signal over background.  I used the standard workhorse microphone of the touring band--the Shure Beta 58A (frequency response 50 to 16,000 Hz with a cardiod curve)--but it's going to take a bit more sophistication than this to get a good recording, perhaps a fine condenser or ribbon microphone but one with a bi-directional or omnidirectional pattern like a Neumann or, supposedly as good and a lot cheaper, a Peluso.  Also it will need to have a low frequency response (flat to 20Hz)...wouldn't you agree?  I have digital recording systems from M-Audio and Apple Logic Express (E-Magic Logic on PC) and an old Mackie 1608 sound board (but it still has really great mic pre-amps), but when I tried to record the Hum previously, I used only the Beta 58A into an M-Audio Fast Track Pro into Logic Express WITHOUT mic pre-amps...it didn't work.  Next time I'll use my Mackie pre-amps (but I wish I had a better mic).

      This brings me to the question, if the Hum is represented by a true sound wave with measurable SPL (sound pressure level), what is so unique about it that it cannot be sensed by 90-99% of the population?  I wonder about this percentage spread...I realize that the data just may not be available, but the idea that so few people can actually hear the Hum is puzzling.  How could a definitive study be designed and executed to test this?  In my own experience, unfortunately most of the people who I have corralled and asked if they could hear the Hum were somewhat under the influence of alcohol (I do not drink alcohol, much) and one of the first senses to be affected by drinking alcohol is HEARING (that's why while playing in two-bit rock & roll bands for 35+ years, we'd yell to the crowd...the more you drink, the better we sound!).

      I would definitely be interested to know more about your seismic detector--how do you think you could filter out the background (or is that not your goal)?  I have my old band gear for my sound system at home: 2-JBL MR935 (each with 12-in horn, 7-in tweeter, 15-in midrange) & 2- JBL MR918 (each with 18" subwoofer) each powered by one half side of 2-Crown CE2000...running stereo 1000 watts a side and crossed over at 100 Hz...your recording came through loud and clear!

      I look forward to further discussion on your recording projects,

      Chip

      Chip

      I know that I should do my homework first and read through this treasure trove of information--I will, but I am a bit excited to have finally found, well, bird's of a feather. Have any surveys been performed on Hearers?

      ----- Original Message ----
      From: Tom Becker <gtbecker@...>
      To: humforum@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Saturday, October 11, 2008 11:06:54 AM
      Subject: Re: HUM_FORUM: New to the Group

      Hello, Chip. Your story is similar to others.

      I, too, discovered my Hum where few man-made sounds should be heard - in
      the middle of the Everglades - while pursuing my hobby then, natural
      field recording. At the time I discounted what I heard as a distant
      well pump (in south Florida, some fields are irrigated by pump trucks
      that draw from bore holes and spray from what amounts to a gigantic lawn
      sprinkler head). These diesel pump trucks can often be heard at many
      miles and, at that time, there remained an area within the park that was
      farmed. Still, I was 20 miles from there and I recall being most
      annoyed that I couldn't find a truly quiet location anywhere in the
      'Glades after a number of years of recording. [I have since found that
      my pursuit at the time, "to record the silence of nature", as I used to
      describe my efforts, was a fallacy; I've learned that nature is anything
      but silent.]

      It was not until we moved into our home on the west coast of Florida,
      though, that I became interested in the hum that I hear here - and hums
      that others claim to have recorded acoustically. You'll find much of
      that in the archives in this group. I've been diverted to other more
      practically- demanding projects that consume my time, but will return to
      pursuing Hum recording this winter.

      Meanwhile, I got as far as building a magnetically- suspended piezo
      seismic detector that I have well-attached to the substantial concrete
      seawall that lines the canals around my home (the sensor initially was
      on the house's foundation slab). What I hear as my Hum is similar to
      this recording of the greatly-amplified (~+70dB) aggregate-rumble (my
      term) of the Earth under foot here, which includes pool pumps, A/C
      compressors, automobiles, et al. These sounds are not well reproduced
      with most speakers so, ideally, wear closed-cup quality headphones:
      http://rightime. com/Hum/Gravity/ CapeCoral2008052 5Below100Hz. mp3 ( you'll
      also hear some MP3 artifacts).

      These sounds are very similar (to my ear) to those presented by some
      others, notably T.J.Moir, whose work was heralded by some as genuine
      recordings of The Auckland Hum (personally, I believe he recorded
      vehicular traffic noises - not The Hum). You'll find links to stereo
      comparisons of his recording and mine, too.

      If you are able, try to record what you perceive and post it, please.

      Tom
      Cape Coral

    • cooperman_98
      Brilliant report Chip. You have described the hum in ways that all hearers can relate to. Best regards.
      Message 2 of 11 , Oct 12, 2008
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        Brilliant report Chip.

        You have described the hum in ways that all hearers can relate to.

        Best regards.
      • Tom Becker
        ... by drinking alcohol... I, too, mostly recall my days in the music business (many years recording and live mixing, many weekends with a house blues band,
        Message 3 of 11 , Oct 12, 2008
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          > ... Shure SM58A... bars... and one of the first senses to be affected
          by drinking alcohol...

          I, too, mostly recall my days in the music business (many years
          recording and live mixing, many weekends with a house blues band, many
          dawns). I was never a big drinker, but my old friends told me that pot
          also affects hearing, temporarily and dramatically reducing sensitivity
          to the low-end. One can hear the resulting effect, e.g. in raggae
          recordings, where the recordist has unwittingly compensated and produced
          a bass-heavy mix. [Actually, this might be medicinally therapeutic to
          some - by selectively reducing the sensitivity to low frequencies
          chemically - if the signal path of The Hum is the same as that of sound.]

          I think an SM58 would not do well trying to capture very low frequency
          sounds (although in a pinch I've used it or a 57 in a kick drum and as a
          hammer, of course), but it's worth trying if you have a quiet preamp
          with a flat low-end. FWIW, while I think it is necessary to go through
          the exercise, most believe The Hum is not an acoustic phenomenon and
          cannot be (or has not been successfully) recorded with conventional
          airborne-sound recording technologies.

          I built a coaxial vibration sensor that floats on a magnetic bearing,
          and have half-built the extension of that, a fully-levitated
          differential seismic sensor. I hope it is ultimately sensitive to only
          modulation of gravity, the direction of my thrust. In the archive, I
          think I've left links to the design and photos of the early version that
          produced the MP3 of the previous post.

          I'm leaning toward the notion that we are able to perceive something
          other than sound with our human sound apparatus. Perhaps the cochlea
          can sense rapid gravity change, even of very small magnitude, and we
          have become aware of the resulting "sound" caused by that, in the inner
          ear. If the signal path is shared with acoustic sound, external sounds
          can mix and mask the Hum sensation, and our AGC-like variable
          sensitivity can modulate it, I believe. I can find a location where the
          Hum level is similar to voices in another room, for example; each spoken
          sound rides above the Hum and reduces or mutes it for the duration of
          the word, just like a compressed radio announcer's voice will "duck" the
          music bed under him.

          Although I read that The Hum for some is deafening, mine is not so
          pronounced. I needed a while to decide that I really did hear something
          unusual - and that my wife did not, or could not. Perhaps it is
          possible that one needs to be trained to hear The Hum. My wife has
          listened to music all her life, for instance, but only recently is she
          able to separate and identify different cymbals, as I've pointed them
          out to her; she can now better separate a kick drum from a bass guitar,
          which were, previously, somehow the same sound to her ear. Maybe she
          can hear The Hum, after all, but cannot yet separate it from other
          competing sounds.

          We look forward to your discoveries, Chip.


          Tom
        • John Locke
          Hi Chip, I have read that the Hum sounds louder in close proximity to a lake. It is usually louder indoors. I started hearing it louder again September 21st.
          Message 4 of 11 , Oct 12, 2008
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            Hi Chip,
            I have read that the Hum sounds louder in close proximity to a lake.
            It is usually louder indoors.
            I started hearing it louder again September 21st. Which coincidentally ?, is the autumnal equinox. I have also noticed the hum is louder after about 2:00 AM, with the loudest being after 4:00 AM.
            I have also noticed the hum is louder after a soaking rain. We had about 6 inches of rain here in Marietta ,GA last week, and the next day after the rain the hum was much louder. Since I have noticed for years this repeatable fact. I surmise the increased Hum after a soaking rain is due to either, the ground being saturated, or more denser air due to higher humidity levels of the rain evaporating. Additionally, the ground will be more electrically conductive. Also I have done some reading on sound refraction. Sound refraction can occur over a lake, with the more denser air over a lake causes the sound wave to refract lower (in height) closer to the surface of a lake. Also a more dense cooler air , not necessarily located over a lake, will cause a sound wave to refract lower (in height).
            Thisl ed me to think that this is a sound wave, and the sound wave usually travels higher, but can refract lower to the ground in the wee hours of the day due to the more dense and cooler are closer to the ground. Look up refraction of sound waves and you can see what I mean.The theory that I think is more plausible is that this is a barely audible low frequency sound wave. There is also an EMF theory which might be possible.
            I think the undulations of the wave is due to varying pressure gradients in the atmosphere.
            You have a very good description of what I hear.
            Also I have noticed that after a soaking rain, the Hum last longer into the day, and is quite loud even after 10:00 AM. Usually, the Hum will tend to dissapate after 8:00 AM.
             
            Perhaps this information will help you formulate an hypothesis of the oprigen and cause of this Hum. Or at least, keep this in the back of your mind for future reference. Thanks


          • Chip Johnson
            Hi John, Thanks for your comments and ideas. I have noted in general that a lot of the Hum complaints come from around bodies of water (except most
            Message 5 of 11 , Oct 12, 2008
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              Hi John,

              Thanks for your comments and ideas.  I have noted in general that a lot of the Hum complaints come from around bodies of water (except most confusingly, Taos, NM).  I am situated on a peninsula and for a while, I was wondering if small piece of bedrock like this could act as a tine on a fork and vibrate even more.  Especially when I walk no more than half mile down my road and visit a friend whose cabin is on the same lake, but situated on a bluff--I don't hear anything at his cabin.  But after reading so much today, I'm really leaning toward the gravity theory...of course I'm relatively new to this and I'm likely to be jumping from camp to camp until I am convinced one way or the other.  But while I'm giving it my best attempt to record the Hum, perhaps I'll try aiming my mic toward the lake on a couple of takes (thanks for the idea!).

              It rained here all day and the Hum was quite prominent all day as I was pacing through the database.  It's good to hear from someone who has had years of experience, as again, I'm just getting my feet wet...


              Chip

              ----- Original Message ----
              From: John Locke <jlocke3000@...>
              To: humforum@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Sunday, October 12, 2008 10:27:29 PM
              Subject: HUM_FORUM: Re: New to the Group

              Hi Chip,
              I have read that the Hum sounds louder in close proximity to a lake.
              It is usually louder indoors.
              I started hearing it louder again September 21st. Which coincidentally ?, is the autumnal equinox. I have also noticed the hum is louder after about 2:00 AM, with the loudest being after 4:00 AM.
              I have also noticed the hum is louder after a soaking rain. We had about 6 inches of rain here in Marietta ,GA last week, and the next day after the rain the hum was much louder. Since I have noticed for years this repeatable fact. I surmise the increased Hum after a soaking rain is due to either, the ground being saturated, or more denser air due to higher humidity levels of the rain evaporating. Additionally, the ground will be more electrically conductive. Also I have done some reading on sound refraction. Sound refraction can occur over a lake, with the more denser air over a lake causes the sound wave to refract lower (in height) closer to the surface of a lake. Also a more dense cooler air , not necessarily located over a lake, will cause a sound wave to refract lower (in height).
              Thisl ed me to think that this is a sound wave, and the sound wave usually travels higher, but can refract lower to the ground in the wee hours of the day due to the more dense and cooler are closer to the ground. Look up refraction of sound waves and you can see what I mean.The theory that I think is more plausible is that this is a barely audible low frequency sound wave. There is also an EMF theory which might be possible.
              I think the undulations of the wave is due to varying pressure gradients in the atmosphere.
              You have a very good description of what I hear.
              Also I have noticed that after a soaking rain, the Hum last longer into the day, and is quite loud even after 10:00 AM. Usually, the Hum will tend to dissapate after 8:00 AM.
               
              Perhaps this information will help you formulate an hypothesis of the oprigen and cause of this Hum. Or at least, keep this in the back of your mind for future reference. Thanks


            • Chip Johnson
              Ah yes...Bob Marley...really heavy on the bottom end (now I understand!) I know exactly what your talking about picking out individual sounds from a
              Message 6 of 11 , Oct 12, 2008
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                Ah yes...Bob Marley...really heavy on the bottom end (now I understand!)

                I know exactly what your talking about picking out individual sounds from a mix...that's the key to a good sound engineer and it does take practice and a bit of ear training.  Some have a natural or innate ability while others have to work at it.  We are all very different with respect to our abilities to sense timbre and pitch as well. My brother had perfect pitch, so he could pull an A=440 Hz out of his pocket whenever needed.  For me,  I could usually get pretty close for the individual notes on guitar, but only with years of practice.  My mother could hold a tune in a bucket--it all has to do with our ears, so it doesn't entirely surprise me that there is a population that doesn't hear the Hum, but I bet there are more than 10% that could, given good listening environments and a bit of coaching.

                As you may have read in earlier posts today, I am very much leaning toward the idea of a gravitational wave.  At our threshold of hearing (0 dB or 10^-12Weber/M^2--the rustling of leaves is a whole order of magnitude higher), just very small levels of intensity changes can be detected, and our hearing apparatus is so incredibly sensitive that it seems plausible that a gravitational wave could be responsible.  I have a good friend who is an otolaryngologist in St. Paul (I can't believe he was a my cabin this summer and I didn't even bring up the topic of the Hum)...perhaps he'd be a good source for some info.

                Anyway, let me know if you have any specific physiological questions that I may be able to relay to him and keep us informed of the progress of your detector--fascinating stuff!

                Chip


                ----- Original Message ----
                From: Tom Becker <gtbecker@...>
                To: humforum@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Sunday, October 12, 2008 10:15:37 AM
                Subject: Re: HUM_FORUM: New to the Group

                > ... Shure SM58A... bars... and one of the first senses to be affected

                by drinking alcohol...

                I, too, mostly recall my days in the music business (many years
                recording and live mixing, many weekends with a house blues band, many
                dawns). I was never a big drinker, but my old friends told me that pot
                also affects hearing, temporarily and dramatically reducing sensitivity
                to the low-end. One can hear the resulting effect, e.g. in raggae
                recordings, where the recordist has unwittingly compensated and produced
                a bass-heavy mix. [Actually, this might be medicinally therapeutic to
                some - by selectively reducing the sensitivity to low frequencies
                chemically - if the signal path of The Hum is the same as that of sound.]

                I think an SM58 would not do well trying to capture very low frequency
                sounds (although in a pinch I've used it or a 57 in a kick drum and as a
                hammer, of course), but it's worth trying if you have a quiet preamp
                with a flat low-end. FWIW, while I think it is necessary to go through
                the exercise, most believe The Hum is not an acoustic phenomenon and
                cannot be (or has not been successfully) recorded with conventional
                airborne-sound recording technologies.

                I built a coaxial vibration sensor that floats on a magnetic bearing,
                and have half-built the extension of that, a fully-levitated
                differential seismic sensor. I hope it is ultimately sensitive to only
                modulation of gravity, the direction of my thrust. In the archive, I
                think I've left links to the design and photos of the early version that
                produced the MP3 of the previous post.

                I'm leaning toward the notion that we are able to perceive something
                other than sound with our human sound apparatus. Perhaps the cochlea
                can sense rapid gravity change, even of very small magnitude, and we
                have become aware of the resulting "sound" caused by that, in the inner
                ear. If the signal path is shared with acoustic sound, external sounds
                can mix and mask the Hum sensation, and our AGC-like variable
                sensitivity can modulate it, I believe. I can find a location where the
                Hum level is similar to voices in another room, for example; each spoken
                sound rides above the Hum and reduces or mutes it for the duration of
                the word, just like a compressed radio announcer's voice will "duck" the
                music bed under him.

                Although I read that The Hum for some is deafening, mine is not so
                pronounced. I needed a while to decide that I really did hear something
                unusual - and that my wife did not, or could not. Perhaps it is
                possible that one needs to be trained to hear The Hum. My wife has
                listened to music all her life, for instance, but only recently is she
                able to separate and identify different cymbals, as I've pointed them
                out to her; she can now better separate a kick drum from a bass guitar,
                which were, previously, somehow the same sound to her ear. Maybe she
                can hear The Hum, after all, but cannot yet separate it from other
                competing sounds.

                We look forward to your discoveries, Chip.

                Tom

              • humshaker2003
                Hi Chip, Your description is excellent. My hum is in my left ear no matter which way I turn. The pitch meanders around low A and feels electromagnetic in
                Message 7 of 11 , Oct 21, 2008
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                  Hi Chip,

                  Your description is excellent. My hum is in my left ear no matter which way I turn.
                  The pitch meanders around low A and feels electromagnetic in nature like something
                  messing with my brainwaves. The overtones often resemble a dominant 9th chord
                  and if I concentrate I can even make them go up and down a half step. I've trained myself
                  to block it out of my consciousness but sometimes like tonight it's just too darn loud.
                  Thank god for music and ipods. You are not alone. Like Arne I've been hearing this a long
                  time... since 2003. When it becomes very intense I have a physical sensation of vibration
                  which is really annoying.

                  --- In humforum@yahoogroups.com, Chip Johnson <chip@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hello to all,
                  >
                  > My name is Chip and I thought I'd take this opportunity to introduce myself, reveal a bit
                  about my background and my experience with the hum. First, as I've seen many have
                  voiced, I am exceedingly grateful to have finally found others that can hear or perceive this
                  sound. I am a researcher by training (molecular biology) and I am therefore a bit
                  embarrassed that it took me about 8-months to finally have hit "pay dirt" and find direct
                  information on "the hum". I think it took me so long because I was convinced that it must
                  surely be originating from my electric utility company and in most all of my web search
                  terms included a somewhat misleading term 60-cycle, which I now know is not quite
                  accurate. I am also a musician, for better or worse, and have studied a bit of acoustics
                  and electronics on the side. The hum has interfered when working on original
                  compositions. It has recently given me a headache over my left eye and it often
                  momentarily hurts
                  > my right ear. I've come to believe that it is here to stay, and that's downright
                  depressing--but at least now that I've found that so many others are aware of it...perhaps
                  there is hope of finding the root cause and stopping it.
                  >
                  > I realize that I tend to ramble, but if I still have your attention thus far (before getting
                  into my story) I am wondering if any body else hears more than one tone at a time (or any
                  time), or do you hear just "the hum". As explained in detail two paragraphs down, in my
                  experience the sounds change often during the day or night. Also, have there been any
                  large meetings or conferences where hearers have met with one another? Anyway, this is
                  my story...
                  >
                  > I have a cabin next to a lake in north central Minnesota (Ten Mile Lake near Hackensack,
                  MN) where I have spent many of my summer days all my 54 years of life. Last year was
                  the first that I stayed at the cabin for the entire year through the winter. I was really
                  looking forward to some absolute peace and quiet and just listen to the sound of
                  snowflakes hitting the earth and slowly stacking up. As the summer vacationers left with
                  their motor boats, jet skis and vehicles, I soon was left with just the sound of the weather
                  and last loons before they too set on their annual migratory path, except for what I
                  thought was an ever present 60-cycle hum of my electric utility--now that I was about
                  the only person for miles left on the lake, this hum was becoming the loudest sound--a
                  sound that I thought was familiar and yet seemed to take on peculiar characteristics and
                  persisted day and night. I became disappointed that I'd have to put up with this constant
                  > hum when I just wanted to hear "the sounds of silence". My disappointment turned to
                  anger one day and I decided to turn off the main circuit breaker so that I could, at least for
                  a while, listen to the sounds of nature. Much to my surprise and chagrin, the hum did not
                  go away when I turned off the power to the cabin. For a while, I left the power off and
                  went outside to see if I could detect the hum outside close to the poles that carried my
                  power lines. Sure enough, although much more faintly, I could still hear the hum! It was
                  confusing to me because I reasoned that if I were to break the flow of electricity into my
                  cabin, I should not hear it in the cabin--but the sound remain constant, always very low
                  in volume, but ALWAYS there. Then I theorized that my cabin must acting like a
                  resonating chamber and that its wood frame somehow, whether through the ground, air
                  or actual wired connection, conducted and amplified a 60-cycle hum that is
                  > characteristic of electric transmission in the U.S.. I finally had a chance to test this idea
                  when in March, high winds blew over a large spruce tree and broke the electric line that
                  led to my cabin--the hum PERSISTED!! I was bent on the idea that the hum must surely
                  be electrical in origin. This was enough for me to inquire with the power company. Being
                  cautious not to be perceived as a “nut case”, I called to power company during
                  regular business hours, identified myself as a customer and simply asked if they had ever
                  received any calls reporting a constant and audible hum from their lines. I knew I was
                  already “in trouble” when the receptionist said “Hmmm...that’s a new one!”
                  She proceeded to place me on hold while she checked with others about my question.
                  When she came back on line, she told me that no one had reported this previously, but she
                  would send someone out to investigate. At the time, I told her they really did not
                  > have to go to such lengths and I was just curious to see if others had called about the
                  same occurrence. But she was insistent, almost as if it were company policy to investigate
                  any, and all concerns. So, the next day or so, two trucks and three men came down to our
                  point to investigate. It was a bright, cool and slightly windy day, but I could clearly hear
                  the sound in all of our buildings: 3-cabins, a shed, a pump house and a sauna. They
                  turned off their trucks and got out to listen. I could hear the sound as I stood with them
                  in our driveway, but of course, I am well tuned to them. None of them could hear what I
                  was hearing--it was very subtle, but constant and yet ever changing in character (pitches,
                  pulsing, oscillations and somewhat in volume, but always fairly quiet and subtle). I
                  suggested that they come to the sauna which has the best insulation contained in the
                  walls out of all of the structures. One of the older men followed me
                  > inside the sauna and I shut the door; we stood in silence. There, I could hear it quite
                  clearly without any other ambient sound--but the rep from the electric company said he
                  could not hear a thing...then he said, “but I’m probably the worst of the three of us
                  because I have poor hearing”...OH GREAT! The three of them got back in their trucks
                  and said what ever it was, it was not from them--they smiled and headed down the road,
                  probably talking about me being “off my rocker”.
                  >
                  > My description of what I hear is the following. First of all the sound is constant,
                  persistent--there is always a very low volume and low frequency basal “rumble”
                  centered on D♯1/E♭1 in the contra-octave (Helmholtz name) or ~39 Hz (I say â
                  €œrumble” because this tone seems to be made up of a broader band than a pure 39 Hz
                  wave--it seems as though it consists of enharmonic tones clustered around 39 Hz, which
                  gives it a moving or slightly pulsing character, liken to a diesel engine in the far distance).
                  But then I hear other slightly louder tones superposed or interleaved on this basal tone.
                  Often the full feature is represented by a 1st position E♭major triad of E♭1 (39 Hz), G1
                  (49 Hz) & B♭1 (58 Hz) with increasing volume with increasing pitch, however the middle
                  tone (G1 at 49 Hz) is often missing. I have heard (albeit rarely), or perceived the G1 to
                  sound closer to G♭1 (46 Hz). In general, detection of this sound (collectively) or
                  > hum is best when ambient sound is nil (no wind, rain, traffic, refrigerator, voices, etc.).
                  >
                  > There also seems to be a spatial characteristic as well (and I have seen another
                  reference to this phenomenon) in that the lower frequency tones seem to be presented to
                  my right ear most of the time (but actually, as I listen at this moment, it seems I'm
                  experiencing sound pressure at both of my ears). For me, the B♭1 (58.27 Hz â†' closest
                  to the old “60-cycle hum”) sounds like it is coming from behind me, slightly above
                  and to my left. This is true no matter what my cardinal point is--the sound(s) seem to be
                  omni-directional, and yet organized when presented to my senses. They seem louder
                  when I am in a building structure, presumably amplified by harmonic resonance, but I hear
                  them faintly outside of the structures and a long way up my road (only when the weather
                  is quiet). I have not detected them in town (about 7-miles away), but I have not yet
                  thoroughly explored this area. I have not heard them in a friend’s house just outside
                  of town.
                  > I believe that the spatial perception must have to do with the transmission of auditory
                  signals and how our nerves, neurotransmitters and brain interact. Somewhere along this
                  thought too must lie the key as to why only a small percentage of the population can
                  actually sense the hum--this must be due to genetic variation, perhaps in polymorphic or
                  mutant neuropetides. Or perhaps somewhat larger structural differences--but surely the
                  difference between hearers vs. non-hearers must be genetic. Are there any family studies
                  out there?
                  >
                  > I have also wondered if the audible sounds could be caused by harmonics of a
                  fundamental wave that is below the threshold of human hearing i.e. below 10 Hzâ†' but
                  this really begs the question, why? or what? For what would such a wave be used? Why is
                  it constant and for so many years? How much energy has been expended and what is the
                  source? Maybe a natural force causes it but if so, shouldn't it be cause for some serious
                  research? Many seem to point to ELF from the U.S. Navy, in which case I think the problem
                  would be difficult to mitigate.
                  >
                  > For the last week or so I have kept a random log (time) of the various frequencies and
                  weather conditions (temperature, barometric pressure, wind velocity)--I only have 9-days
                  of these data and no trend has leaped out at me as of yet--time will tell if I have the
                  tenacity to continue this log.
                  >
                  > I look forward to contributing in any way I can to this forum in hopes of abolishing the
                  hum,
                  >
                  > Chip
                  >
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