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Re: Gravity, Take 2

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  • Tom Becker
    For technical comments, please, here is my current sensor design. On advice of a holographer friend, I ve dropped the triangular pyramid point support; he
    Message 1 of 13 , May 31 6:18 PM
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      For technical comments, please, here is my current sensor design. On
      advice of a holographer friend, I've dropped the triangular pyramid
      point support; he insists that I'll trouble with it. I trust his
      vibratory expertise.

      The sensor will be in a Faraday enclosure for EM isolation (m�-metal
      would be interesting). It will use two identical piezo disks to
      differentially sense vertical motion between two magnetically-coupled
      coaxial cylinders.

      Two additional magnetically-coupled piezo disks will support the outer
      floating cylinder. These disks can be used two ways, I believe: they
      can differentially sense vibration from the concrete pad that can be
      scaled and removed from the floating sensors' data, or perhaps they
      can be used to actively stabilize the floating sensors by canceling
      vibration, using them as acuators.

      http://rightime.com/Hum/Gravity/Floater3.bmp

      Any thoughts?


      Tom
      Cape Coral
    • John Locke
      I m glad there are engineering types taking this seriously because they are doing things that I can not do.
      Message 2 of 13 , Jun 1, 2008
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        I'm glad there are engineering types taking this seriously because they are doing things that I can not do.

      • Di Ford
        Exactly! John Locke wrote: I m glad there are engineering types taking this seriously because they are doing things that I can
        Message 3 of 13 , Jun 1, 2008
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          Exactly!

          John Locke <jlocke3000@...> wrote:
          I'm glad there are engineering types taking this seriously because they are doing things that I can not do.

        • Tom Becker
          FYI: With a simple Michaelson Interferometer, a laser-based motion sensor: http://rightime.com/Hum/Gravity/Floater4a.bmp Laser interferometry is an optical
          Message 4 of 13 , Jun 1, 2008
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            FYI: With a simple Michaelson Interferometer, a laser-based motion
            sensor: http://rightime.com/Hum/Gravity/Floater4a.bmp

            Laser interferometry is an optical method of motion sensing that uses
            a reflected beam to determine the change in distance between two
            points, here a tiny 45-degree mirror and a glass bead (or a small
            retroreflector). The resulting resolution is very good, on the order
            of 100nm (0.000001mm); pretty sensitive.

            I haven't yet determined if I can find affordable sufficiently-small
            optical components but, lacking them, I'll revert to the piezos.


            Tom
            Cape Coral
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