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A question about Syriac transcribing characteristics or methods

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  • said hayati
    Dear Colleagues Does anyone knows any reference about Syriac transcribing characteristics or methods? I would be grateful for any helps. Best regards, Said
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 4, 2013
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      Dear Colleagues

      Does anyone knows any reference about Syriac transcribing characteristics or methods?

      I would be grateful for any helps.

      Best regards,

      Said hayaati

      Saied.hayati5300@...

    • Michelson, David Allen
      Dear Said, Do you mean historically or as a current practice by scholars? If you mean making a modern transcription (or digital edition) of a manuscript, then
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 4, 2013
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        Dear Said,

        Do you mean historically or as a current practice by scholars? If you mean making a modern transcription (or digital edition) of a manuscript, then I would point you to TPEN. Syriaca.org is working on developing a digital standard using the TEI (Text Encoding Initiative). You can see a sample of that in Latin use here: 


        Or are you referring to Romanization/Transliteration? If so there are currently two standard methods for English usage:

        The Library of Congress recently approved these guidelines (drafted by J.F. Coakley): 

        http://www.loc.gov/catdir/cpso/roman.html (These are for use by librarians in cataloguing, but applicable elsewhere as well).

        There is also another system that is also becoming common in use, that used by the Gorgias Encyclopedic Dictionary of the Syriac Heritage and in use in other Gorgias Press publications. See page x of the preface to GEDSH for the guidelines.

        Syriaca.org is working to create a conversion table between the two and the Syriac script itself, but due to vocalization issues it is not clear if this will be possible.

        I am curious, can anyone the this list point me to transliteration standards for rendering Syriac into French, German, and modern standard Arabic and Malayalam (modern usages, not historical Garshuni)? If so I would love to learn about those.

        Best,
        Dave



        David A. Michelson

        Assistant Professor of Early Christianity, Divinity School
        Affiliate Assistant Professor of Classics, College of Arts & Sciences

        Vanderbilt University 
        Divinity Quadrangle
        411 21st Avenue South
        Nashville, TN  37240

        Phone: (615) 343-3990
        Fax: (615) 343-5449




        From: said hayati <saied.hayati5300@...>
        Reply-To: "hugoye-list@yahoogroups.com" <hugoye-list@yahoogroups.com>
        Date: Thursday, April 4, 2013 1:00 PM
        To: "hugoye-list@yahoogroups.com" <hugoye-list@yahoogroups.com>
        Subject: [hugoye-list] A question about Syriac transcribing characteristics or methods

         

        Dear Colleagues

        Does anyone knows any reference about Syriac transcribing characteristics or methods?

        I would be grateful for any helps.

        Best regards,

        Said hayaati

        Saied.hayati5300@...

      • Steven Ring
        Dear Said, See an extract from my Syriac website below which suggests a way to transcribe Syriac. I am not sure whether this is what you wanted, but it might
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 4, 2013
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          Dear Said,

          See an extract from my Syriac website below which suggests a way to transcribe Syriac.
          I am not sure whether this is what you wanted, but it might be useful anyway...

          Best regards,
          Steven.

          Transcribing Syriac or other non-Roman languages using Roman letters

          Even if you have set up your PC to read and write an oriental language like Pahlavi, Syriac or Malayalam, you may also wish to transcribe such oriental texts using a Roman font. It is sometimes useful to be able to write these oriental languages using a Roman transcription font. This approach has several advantages; It is sometimes easier to indicate the pronunciation of an oriental word using a transcribed text than it is in the original alphabet and secondly, transcriptions assist people to read your work, even if they do not know the oriental alphabet in question.

          The 'Gentium basic' UNICODE font is useful to transcribe Syriac texts using Roman letters, because this font includes all the diacritics needed to transcribe Syriac words:

          Here are the lower-case letters useful to transcribe Syriac texts taken from the 'Gentium basic' font:
          The 22 ordinary lower-case Syriac letters: 
           b g d h w z ḥ ṭ y k l m n s ‘ p ṣ q r sh t
          The lower-case spirant (softened) Syriac letters: v gh ḍ ḳ ph th
          The most important Syriac vowels: a ā e ē ī ai o ō ū
          The shewa (i.e. the very short e vowel) can also be written if needed: ĕ

          The upper-case letters are also available in the same font:
          The 22 ordinary upper-case Syriac letters: 
           B G D H W Z Ḥ Ṭ Y K L M N S ‘ P Ṣ Q R Sh T
          The upper-case spirant (softened) Syriac letters: V Gh Ḍ Ḳ Ph Th
          The most important Syriac vowels: A Ā E Ē Ī Ai O Ō Ū
          The shewa (i.e. the very short e vowel) can also be written if needed: Ĕ

          On 04/04/2013 19:00, said hayati wrote:
           

          Dear Colleagues

          Does anyone knows any reference about Syriac transcribing characteristics or methods?

          I would be grateful for any helps.

          Best regards,

          Said hayaati

          Saied.hayati5300@...

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