Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [hreg] Re: Slightly off topic - fruit drying with solar

Expand Messages
  • Philip Timmons
    Sorry to jump in late . . .  really wondering about this . . .  but does it make sense to convert the Sun to electric (very lossy + expensive equipment) and
    Message 1 of 8 , Jul 2, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      Sorry to jump in late . . .  really wondering about this . . .  but does it make sense to convert the Sun to electric (very lossy + expensive equipment) and then convert the electricity to heat (the drying oven) -- all just do what a Solar heater / oven could do directly?

      Would it not be easier and cheaper to just use a solar heat oven to do the drying?

      Thanks.

      --- On Fri, 7/2/10, mkewert@... <mkewert@...> wrote:

      From: mkewert@... <mkewert@...>
      Subject: Re: [hreg] Re: Slightly off topic - fruit drying with solar
      To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Friday, July 2, 2010, 5:34 PM

       

      Jay,
      thank you very much. That's the one we were looking at, actually. It said adjustable thermostat 85-145F, so I was wondering if you can dry at 85F and just take longer. But the video suggested different temps for different applications.
      thanks again,
      Mike
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "jay_7227" <yahoo@mailbot. transcendent. us>
      To: hreg@yahoogroups. com
      Sent: Friday, July 2, 2010 9:08:41 AM
      Subject: [hreg] Re: Slightly off topic - fruit drying with solar

       

      I am most familiar with the "Excalibur dryer", which is a high quality unit, better than the round ones with the vertical airflow that you would get at most local retail stores.

      Here is a link, for a basic reference. Check out the videos, they are really good:
      http://www.excalibu rdehydrator. com/

      And Amazon (for the reviews)
      http://www.amazon. com/s/url= search-alias% 3Daps&field-keywords= excalibur+ Dehydrator

      The first video gives you a good idea of how much you can put on a tray. The answer is "a lot". Each tray holds maybe 8-12 apples or oranges or things about that size, per tray. The smallest unit is 5 trays I think.

      The smallest unit is about 400 watts, which honestly is a lot to be running on PV. Normal drying times are in the 8 hour range.

      So power use initially seems pretty steep, and I guess it is. But the longer you store the food, the lower the power required for storage gets; food that has been dehydrated is food that doesn't need to be refrigerated. I am not really sure how it compares with canning, but it is probably favorable.

      I don't think you can run any dehydrator without heat, the food will spoil; I could be wrong. I have never seen a 12V model.

      Good luck!

      --- In hreg@yahoogroups. com, mkewert@... wrote:
      >
      > I know that theory says the most efficient way to dry fruit with the sun is in a solar fruit dryer, but for reasons of reliability and ease I am trying to price out how a PV powered electric fruit dryer would compare. So, I'm looking for anyone with experience drying fruit. If that's you, will you email me at mkewert@... please?
      >
      > My questions are:
      > How much fruit can you dry per day in one of those little table top dehydrators?
      > Can you run them with fan only; no heat?
      > Have you ever seen a 12 volt DC unit?
      >
      > Thanks
      > Mike
      >



    • mkewert@comcast.net
      Philip, You are correct. Heating is the preferred way to do it. Robert Foster from New Mexico State (and part of HREG) sent me some great information from
      Message 2 of 8 , Jul 3, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        Philip,
        You are correct. Heating is the preferred way to do it.  Robert Foster from New Mexico State (and part of HREG) sent me some great information from Afghanistan, where he is currently doing some solar drying work. The only advantage of doing it the other way is you could dry fruit in the rain if you stored solar energy in a battery.  Much thanks for the help that several of you have offered on this subject.
        Mike
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Philip Timmons" <philiptimmons@...>
        To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Friday, July 2, 2010 7:15:19 PM
        Subject: Re: [hreg] Re: Slightly off topic - fruit drying with solar

         

        Sorry to jump in late . . .  really wondering about this . . .  but does it make sense to convert the Sun to electric (very lossy + expensive equipment) and then convert the electricity to heat (the drying oven) -- all just do what a Solar heater / oven could do directly?

        Would it not be easier and cheaper to just use a solar heat oven to do the drying?

        Thanks.

        --- On Fri, 7/2/10, mkewert@... <mkewert@...> wrote:

        From: mkewert@... <mkewert@...>
        Subject: Re: [hreg] Re: Slightly off topic - fruit drying with solar
        To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Friday, July 2, 2010, 5:34 PM

         

        Jay,
        thank you very much. That's the one we were looking at, actually. It said adjustable thermostat 85-145F, so I was wondering if you can dry at 85F and just take longer. But the video suggested different temps for different applications.
        thanks again,
        Mike
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "jay_7227" <yahoo@mailbot. transcendent. us>
        To: hreg@yahoogroups. com
        Sent: Friday, July 2, 2010 9:08:41 AM
        Subject: [hreg] Re: Slightly off topic - fruit drying with solar

         

        I am most familiar with the "Excalibur dryer", which is a high quality unit, better than the round ones with the vertical airflow that you would get at most local retail stores.

        Here is a link, for a basic reference. Check out the videos, they are really good:
        http://www.excalibu rdehydrator. com/

        And Amazon (for the reviews)
        http://www.amazon. com/s/url= search-alias% 3Daps&field-keywords= excalibur+ Dehydrator

        The first video gives you a good idea of how much you can put on a tray. The answer is "a lot". Each tray holds maybe 8-12 apples or oranges or things about that size, per tray. The smallest unit is 5 trays I think.

        The smallest unit is about 400 watts, which honestly is a lot to be running on PV. Normal drying times are in the 8 hour range.

        So power use initially seems pretty steep, and I guess it is. But the longer you store the food, the lower the power required for storage gets; food that has been dehydrated is food that doesn't need to be refrigerated. I am not really sure how it compares with canning, but it is probably favorable.

        I don't think you can run any dehydrator without heat, the food will spoil; I could be wrong. I have never seen a 12V model.

        Good luck!

        --- In hreg@yahoogroups. com, mkewert@... wrote:
        >
        > I know that theory says the most efficient way to dry fruit with the sun is in a solar fruit dryer, but for reasons of reliability and ease I am trying to price out how a PV powered electric fruit dryer would compare. So, I'm looking for anyone with experience drying fruit. If that's you, will you email me at mkewert@... please?
        >
        > My questions are:
        > How much fruit can you dry per day in one of those little table top dehydrators?
        > Can you run them with fan only; no heat?
        > Have you ever seen a 12 volt DC unit?
        >
        > Thanks
        > Mike
        >



      • wrpretired@aol.com
        My experience with a dehydrator was that it doesn t work well in this climate, not even inside an air conditioned house. And this was an electric unit with
        Message 3 of 8 , Jul 9, 2010
        • 0 Attachment
          My experience with a dehydrator was that it doesn't work well in this climate, not even inside an air conditioned house.  And this was an electric unit with fan and heater.  All fruits and vegetables that I tried just became moldy before becoming dry.  The more moisture the fruit or vegetable contained in the beginning, the faster it became moldy.  I followed manufacturer's directions.  Perhaps I should have solicited local experience before buying the darned thing.  Does someone else have advice for hot, humid climates?
           
          W. P.



          -----Original Message-----
          From: mkewert@...
          To: HREG <hreg@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Thu, Jul 1, 2010 7:39 pm
          Subject: [hreg] Slightly off topic - fruit drying with solar

           
          I know that theory says the most efficient way to dry fruit with the sun is in a solar fruit dryer, but for reasons of reliability and ease I am trying to price out how a PV powered electric fruit dryer would compare.  So, I'm looking for anyone with experience drying fruit.  If that's you, will you email me at mkewert@comcast. net please?

          My questions are:
          How much fruit can you dry per day in one of those little table top dehydrators?
          Can you run them with fan only; no heat?
          Have you ever seen a 12 volt DC unit?

          Thanks
          Mike
        • Garth & Kim Travis
          Greetings, While I did have this problem when trying to use solar drying, I use my dehydrator quite often and have no problems. The fruit and vegetables must
          Message 4 of 8 , Jul 10, 2010
          • 0 Attachment
            Greetings,

            While I did have this problem when trying to use solar drying, I use my
            dehydrator quite often and have no problems. The fruit and vegetables
            must be slice very thin so they can dry quickly. I use mine out in a
            greenhouse, so I don't get extra heat and moisture in my home.

            Bright Blessings,
            Garth & Kim Travis
            www.TheRoseColoredForest.com
            Bedias, Texas
            936-395-0110

            On 7/9/2010 8:50 PM, wrpretired@... wrote:
            >
            >
            > My experience with a dehydrator was that it doesn't work well in this
            > climate, not even inside an air conditioned house. And this was an
            > electric unit with fan and heater. All fruits and vegetables that I
            > tried just became moldy before becoming dry. The more moisture the fruit
            > or vegetable contained in the beginning, the faster it became moldy. I
            > followed manufacturer's directions. Perhaps I should have solicited
            > local experience before buying the darned thing. Does someone else have
            > advice for hot, humid climates?
            > W. P.
            >
            >
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.