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Re: [hreg] HREG Solar Air Conditioning Tour Recap

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  • Richard Yoo
    Thanks for the recap as I couldn t make it either. Any photos? -richard ... Visit my blog at http://www.richardyoo.com Share your photos at
    Message 1 of 14 , Sep 13, 2009
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      Thanks for the recap as I couldn't make it either.

      Any photos?

      -richard
      ---
      Visit my blog at http://www.richardyoo.com
      Share your photos at http://www.natuba.com




      On Sun, Sep 13, 2009 at 2:38 PM, Kevin Conlin <kevin@...> wrote:
       

      I thought I would summarize the tour for those who couldn't make it.
       
      Milton and his wife Pat were very gracious hosting about 40 people.  The indoor unit was very quiet and even featured emergency lights for power outages that run off the battery bank. It uses a convenient wireless remote rather than a conventional thermostat
       
      The outdoor unit was also extremely quiet, you could talk in a normal tone of voice even while standing right next to it. It seemed very large for a 1.5 ton condenser, so I'm guessing one way they make it so efficient is with a larger than normal heat exchanger.  The fan was whisper quiet.  The system does have provisions for 120VAC input, using the grid for backup gets you the best of both worlds.
       
      Milton's approach is too leave the 120VAC unplugged, as his intention is to use every bit of solar for cooling.  He sees the system as a long term hedge against rising utility costs, ignoring what might be calculated as payback.  He enjoys the satisfaction of offsetting his utility bill with his solar system, and hopes to expand it in the future by adding another 1.5 ton unit.  It should be noted that the complete system does qualify for the 30% federal tax credit, although in his case he had to "educate" the IRS a bit. (Good thing he was a former teacher)
       
      The real beauty of the system is you only cool the portion of your house that is occupied, especially effective at night. This strategy alone offers utility savings.
       
      Four Sanyo 200W modules were mounted on a sturdy rack along the back fence, as their home faces South and the HOA will not allow solar panels. Conduit was run underground and was very clean, additional conduit for possible future expansion was also installed, showing good forethought.
       
      The modules are very high efficiency, they feature an amorphous silicon coating which raises their efficiency several points. They are preferred where space is at a premium and maximum power density is needed.
       
      Milton is using an Outback MPPT controller, or Maximum Power Point Tracking, which is a very good way to use higher voltage modules to charge a battery bank. It is essentially a very efficient DC/DC converter which constantly optimizes battery charging to get the most out of the solar array. Again, there is also plenty of room for expansion, and the digital display gives system status at a glance.
       
      Batteries are the old favorite, Trojan T-105's , 6V, 220Ah golf cart batteries, which are the best battery you can get for the buck.  They will outlast gel batteries and cost half as much. They were safely installed in a ventilated Rubbermaid storage bin with a temperature controlled fan. 
       
      Overall the system was well done and safe.
       
      The thing that impressed me the most is because of the relatively low power draw and DC operation, this is the first AC unit I have seen that is suitable for use with a battery based backup system. In the event of a hurricane or extended power outage, a portion of your home will have air conditioning.  It would also be perfect for a small off grid cabin or beach house.
       
      The unit seemed to be well built and well thought out.  With quiet operation, no duct work and super high efficiency, it seems like a good product whose time has come. This coming from a curmudgeon!
       
      The tour was followed by a friendly happy hour at Las Rosas Mexican Restaurant, where topics from Permaculture to Driver Ed were discussed. A good time was had by all.
       
      Thank you both Milton and Pat for opening your home and sharing your knowledge with us!
       
       
      Kevin Conlin
      Heliosolar Design, Inc.
      13534 Quetzal Lane
      Houston, TX 77083
      C:  (281) 202-9629
      H:  (281) 530-7501
      F:  (281) 530-7501
       
       
       


      From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hreg@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of mkewert
      Sent: Monday, September 07, 2009 10:53 PM
      To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [hreg] Saturday Solar A/C Tour and Networking Social

       

      One of our members, Milton Cecalek, has agreed to show us his Sol Cool solar air-conditioner/heat pump this coming Saturday. His system is a 1.5 ton unit from SolCool. http://www.solcool.net/index.htm It cools and heats his home using a DC compressor and four 200 watt Sanyo PV panels.

      No RSVP is required. All are welcome.

      We will meet at Milton's house.
      5pm Saturday September 12
      6405 Old Oaks Blvd.
      Pearland, TX 77584
      http://www.mapquest.com/maps?city=Pearland&state=TX&address=6405+Old+Oaks+Blvd.

      Immediately following this tour, we will have a Solar Networking Social. Your dinner &/or drinks are on you, and anyone interested in renewable energy is welcome.
      ~6pm Saturday September 12
      Las Rosas Mexican Grill
      6425 Broadway St.
      Pearland, TX 77581
      http://www.lasrosasgrills.com/Locations.asp

      Everyone is invited to either or both functions. We hope to see you there!

      Mike

      No virus found in this incoming message.
      Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
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    • jay.ring@ymail.com
      That was a great summery, very detailed. Thanks Kevin! I was planning on going, I was very disappointed to miss it. These split systems seem to be the way
      Message 2 of 14 , Sep 14, 2009
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        That was a great summery, very detailed. Thanks Kevin!

        I was planning on going, I was very disappointed to miss it.

        These split systems seem to be the way forward, at least for the energy/cost conscious crowd. The part about only cooling the part of the house that is occupied is huge!

        The part about the HOA is really disappointing, and continues to be disappointing. For the life of me I can not understand why people wouldn't want them in the neighborhood. This is something I think we can all work on.

        One question I have is about air filtration. Everyone knows how it gets filtered in a central air system. Is it just ignored in a split system, or part of the per-room unit? Is is an issue at all? I use washable filters to reduce waste, is something like that available?




        --- In hreg@yahoogroups.com, "Kevin Conlin" <kevin@...> wrote:
        >
        > I thought I would summarize the tour for those who couldn't make it.
        >
        > Milton and his wife Pat were very gracious hosting about 40 people. The
        > indoor unit was very quiet and even featured emergency lights for power
        > outages that run off the battery bank. It uses a convenient wireless remote
        > rather than a conventional thermostat
        >
        > The outdoor unit was also extremely quiet, you could talk in a normal tone
        > of voice even while standing right next to it. It seemed very large for a
        > 1.5 ton condenser, so I'm guessing one way they make it so efficient is with
        > a larger than normal heat exchanger. The fan was whisper quiet. The system
        > does have provisions for 120VAC input, using the grid for backup gets you
        > the best of both worlds.
        >
        > Milton's approach is too leave the 120VAC unplugged, as his intention is to
        > use every bit of solar for cooling. He sees the system as a long term hedge
        > against rising utility costs, ignoring what might be calculated as payback.
        > He enjoys the satisfaction of offsetting his utility bill with his solar
        > system, and hopes to expand it in the future by adding another 1.5 ton unit.
        > It should be noted that the complete system does qualify for the 30% federal
        > tax credit, although in his case he had to "educate" the IRS a bit. (Good
        > thing he was a former teacher)
        >
        > The real beauty of the system is you only cool the portion of your house
        > that is occupied, especially effective at night. This strategy alone offers
        > utility savings.
        >
        > Four Sanyo 200W modules were mounted on a sturdy rack along the back fence,
        > as their home faces South and the HOA will not allow solar panels. Conduit
        > was run underground and was very clean, additional conduit for possible
        > future expansion was also installed, showing good forethought.
        >
        > The modules are very high efficiency, they feature an amorphous silicon
        > coating which raises their efficiency several points. They are preferred
        > where space is at a premium and maximum power density is needed.
        >
        > Milton is using an Outback MPPT controller, or Maximum Power Point Tracking,
        > which is a very good way to use higher voltage modules to charge a battery
        > bank. It is essentially a very efficient DC/DC converter which constantly
        > optimizes battery charging to get the most out of the solar array. Again,
        > there is also plenty of room for expansion, and the digital display gives
        > system status at a glance.
        >
        > Batteries are the old favorite, Trojan T-105's , 6V, 220Ah golf cart
        > batteries, which are the best battery you can get for the buck. They will
        > outlast gel batteries and cost half as much. They were safely installed in a
        > ventilated Rubbermaid storage bin with a temperature controlled fan.
        >
        > Overall the system was well done and safe.
        >
        > The thing that impressed me the most is because of the relatively low power
        > draw and DC operation, this is the first AC unit I have seen that is
        > suitable for use with a battery based backup system. In the event of a
        > hurricane or extended power outage, a portion of your home will have air
        > conditioning. It would also be perfect for a small off grid cabin or beach
        > house.
        >
        > The unit seemed to be well built and well thought out. With quiet
        > operation, no duct work and super high efficiency, it seems like a good
        > product whose time has come. This coming from a curmudgeon!
        >
        > The tour was followed by a friendly happy hour at Las Rosas Mexican
        > Restaurant, where topics from Permaculture to Driver Ed were discussed. A
        > good time was had by all.
        >
        > Thank you both Milton and Pat for opening your home and sharing your
        > knowledge with us!
        >
        >
        > Kevin Conlin
        > Heliosolar Design, Inc.
        > 13534 Quetzal Lane
        > Houston, TX 77083
        > C: (281) 202-9629
        > H: (281) 530-7501
        > F: (281) 530-7501
        > kevin@...
      • Justin Owens
        A good time was definitely had by all. Thanks Milton for the invite! I ll upload some more pictures later today. The filtration is similar to that of a window
        Message 3 of 14 , Sep 14, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          A good time was definitely had by all. Thanks Milton for the invite! I'll upload some more pictures later today.
           
          The filtration is similar to that of a window unit. Yes, more than likely, a washable style.
           
          -Justin


          From: "jay.ring@..." <txses@...>
          To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Monday, September 14, 2009 10:01:17 AM
          Subject: [hreg] Re: HREG Solar Air Conditioning Tour Recap

           

          That was a great summery, very detailed. Thanks Kevin!

          I was planning on going, I was very disappointed to miss it.

          These split systems seem to be the way forward, at least for the energy/cost conscious crowd. The part about only cooling the part of the house that is occupied is huge!

          The part about the HOA is really disappointing, and continues to be disappointing. For the life of me I can not understand why people wouldn't want them in the neighborhood. This is something I think we can all work on.

          One question I have is about air filtration. Everyone knows how it gets filtered in a central air system. Is it just ignored in a split system, or part of the per-room unit? Is is an issue at all? I use washable filters to reduce waste, is something like that available?

          --- In hreg@yahoogroups. com, "Kevin Conlin" <kevin@...> wrote:

          >
          > I thought I would summarize the tour for those who couldn't make it.
          >
          > Milton and his wife Pat were very gracious hosting about 40 people. The
          > indoor unit was very quiet and even featured emergency lights for power
          > outages that run off the battery bank. It uses a convenient wireless remote
          > rather than a conventional thermostat
          >
          > The outdoor unit was also extremely quiet, you could talk in a normal tone
          > of voice even while standing right next to it. It seemed very large for a
          > 1.5 ton condenser, so I'm guessing one way they make it so efficient is with
          > a larger than normal heat exchanger. The fan was whisper quiet. The system
          > does have provisions for 120VAC input, using the grid for backup gets you
          > the best of both worlds.
          >
          > Milton's approach is too leave the 120VAC unplugged, as his intention is
          to
          > use every bit of solar for cooling. He sees the system as a long term hedge
          > against rising utility costs, ignoring what might be calculated as payback.
          > He enjoys the satisfaction of offsetting his utility bill with his solar
          > system, and hopes to expand it in the future by adding another 1.5 ton unit.
          > It should be noted that the complete system does qualify for the 30% federal
          > tax credit, although in his case he had to "educate" the IRS a bit. (Good
          > thing he was a former teacher)
          >
          > The real beauty of the system is you only cool the portion of your house
          > that is occupied, especially effective at night. This strategy alone offers
          > utility savings.
          >
          > Four Sanyo 200W modules were mounted on a sturdy rack along the back fence,
          > as their home faces South and the HOA will not allow solar panels. Conduit
          > was run underground and was very clean,
          additional conduit for possible
          > future expansion was also installed, showing good forethought.
          >
          > The modules are very high efficiency, they feature an amorphous silicon
          > coating which raises their efficiency several points. They are preferred
          > where space is at a premium and maximum power density is needed.
          >
          > Milton is using an Outback MPPT controller, or Maximum Power Point Tracking,
          > which is a very good way to use higher voltage modules to charge a battery
          > bank. It is essentially a very efficient DC/DC converter which constantly
          > optimizes battery charging to get the most out of the solar array. Again,
          > there is also plenty of room for expansion, and the digital display gives
          > system status at a glance.
          >
          > Batteries are the old favorite, Trojan T-105's , 6V, 220Ah golf cart
          > batteries, which are the best battery you can get for the buck. They
          will
          > outlast gel batteries and cost half as much. They were safely installed in a
          > ventilated Rubbermaid storage bin with a temperature controlled fan.
          >
          > Overall the system was well done and safe.
          >
          > The thing that impressed me the most is because of the relatively low power
          > draw and DC operation, this is the first AC unit I have seen that is
          > suitable for use with a battery based backup system. In the event of a
          > hurricane or extended power outage, a portion of your home will have air
          > conditioning. It would also be perfect for a small off grid cabin or beach
          > house.
          >
          > The unit seemed to be well built and well thought out. With quiet
          > operation, no duct work and super high efficiency, it seems like a good
          > product whose time has come. This coming from a curmudgeon!
          >
          > The tour was followed by a friendly happy hour at Las Rosas
          Mexican
          > Restaurant, where topics from Permaculture to Driver Ed were discussed. A
          > good time was had by all.
          >
          > Thank you both Milton and Pat for opening your home and sharing your
          > knowledge with us!
          >
          >
          > Kevin Conlin
          > Heliosolar Design, Inc.
          > 13534 Quetzal Lane
          > Houston, TX 77083
          > C: (281) 202-9629
          > H: (281) 530-7501
          > F: (281) 530-7501
          > kevin@...

        • Kevin Conlin
          Hi Jay, Good question, no one asked about the filter, but I m guessing it does have a washable one inside the unit. I agree, between no duct work, selective
          Message 4 of 14 , Sep 14, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            Hi Jay,  Good question, no one asked about the filter, but I'm guessing it does have a washable one inside the unit.
             
            I agree, between no duct work, selective cooling and high efficiency, I too believe they are the next wave.  Problem is finding anyone willing to learn the technology.  It took me 3 months to find a cooperative ac contractor as we just installed a 2 zone Mitsubishi Mr.. Slim on our community clubhouse.  Every one tried to talk me into ductwork.
             
            Since solar panels are not specifically excluded in deed restrictions, it might be worth educating the architectural committee on your homeowners BOD.
            Traditionally the courts have ruled in favor of the homeowners when solar is challenged, but most people don't want that fight.
             
            Best Regards,  Kevin
             
            Kevin Conlin
            Heliosolar Design, Inc.
            13534 Quetzal Lane
            Houston, TX 77083
            C:  (281) 202-9629
            H:  (281) 530-7501
            F:  (281) 530-7501
             
             
             


            From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hreg@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of jay.ring@...
            Sent: Monday, September 14, 2009 10:01 AM
            To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [hreg] Re: HREG Solar Air Conditioning Tour Recap

             

            That was a great summery, very detailed. Thanks Kevin!

            I was planning on going, I was very disappointed to miss it.

            These split systems seem to be the way forward, at least for the energy/cost conscious crowd. The part about only cooling the part of the house that is occupied is huge!

            The part about the HOA is really disappointing, and continues to be disappointing. For the life of me I can not understand why people wouldn't want them in the neighborhood. This is something I think we can all work on.

            One question I have is about air filtration. Everyone knows how it gets filtered in a central air system. Is it just ignored in a split system, or part of the per-room unit? Is is an issue at all? I use washable filters to reduce waste, is something like that available?

            --- In hreg@yahoogroups. com, "Kevin Conlin" <kevin@...> wrote:

            >
            > I thought I would summarize the
            tour for those who couldn't make it.
            >
            > Milton and his wife Pat
            were very gracious hosting about 40 people. The
            > indoor unit was very
            quiet and even featured emergency lights for power
            > outages that run off
            the battery bank. It uses a convenient wireless remote
            > rather than a
            conventional thermostat
            >
            > The outdoor unit was also extremely
            quiet, you could talk in a normal tone
            > of voice even while standing
            right next to it. It seemed very large for a
            > 1.5 ton condenser, so I'm
            guessing one way they make it so efficient is with
            > a larger than normal
            heat exchanger. The fan was whisper quiet. The system
            > does have
            provisions for 120VAC input, using the grid for backup gets you
            > the best
            of both worlds.
            >
            > Milton's approach is too leave the 120VAC
            unplugged, as his intention is to
            > use every bit of solar for cooling. He
            sees the system as a long term hedge
            > against rising utility costs,
            ignoring what might be calculated as payback.
            > He enjoys the satisfaction
            of offsetting his utility bill with his solar
            > system, and hopes to
            expand it in the future by adding another 1.5 ton unit.
            > It should be
            noted that the complete system does qualify for the 30% federal
            > tax
            credit, although in his case he had to "educate" the IRS a bit. (Good
            >
            thing he was a former teacher)
            >
            > The real beauty of the system is
            you only cool the portion of your house
            > that is occupied, especially
            effective at night. This strategy alone offers
            > utility savings.
            >
            > Four Sanyo 200W modules were mounted on a sturdy rack along the back
            fence,
            > as their home faces South and the HOA will not allow solar
            panels. Conduit
            > was run underground and was very clean, additional
            conduit for possible
            > future expansion was also installed, showing good
            forethought.
            >
            > The modules are very high efficiency, they feature
            an amorphous silicon
            > coating which raises their efficiency several
            points. They are preferred
            > where space is at a premium and maximum power
            density is needed.
            >
            > Milton is using an Outback MPPT controller,
            or Maximum Power Point Tracking,
            > which is a very good way to use higher
            voltage modules to charge a battery
            > bank. It is essentially a very
            efficient DC/DC converter which constantly
            > optimizes battery charging to
            get the most out of the solar array. Again,
            > there is also plenty of room
            for expansion, and the digital display gives
            > system status at a
            glance.
            >
            > Batteries are the old favorite, Trojan T-105's , 6V,
            220Ah golf cart
            > batteries, which are the best battery you can get for
            the buck. They will
            > outlast gel batteries and cost half as much. They
            were safely installed in a
            > ventilated Rubbermaid storage bin with a
            temperature controlled fan.
            >
            > Overall the system was well done
            and safe.
            >
            > The thing that impressed me the most is because of
            the relatively low power
            > draw and DC operation, this is the first AC
            unit I have seen that is
            > suitable for use with a battery based backup
            system. In the event of a
            > hurricane or extended power outage, a portion
            of your home will have air
            > conditioning. It would also be perfect for a
            small off grid cabin or beach
            > house.
            >
            > The unit seemed to
            be well built and well thought out. With quiet
            > operation, no duct work
            and super high efficiency, it seems like a good
            > product whose time has
            come. This coming from a curmudgeon!
            >
            > The tour was followed by a
            friendly happy hour at Las Rosas Mexican
            > Restaurant, where topics from
            Permaculture to Driver Ed were discussed. A
            > good time was had by
            all.
            >
            > Thank you both Milton and Pat for opening your home and
            sharing your
            > knowledge with us!
            >
            >
            > Kevin
            Conlin
            > Heliosolar Design, Inc.
            > 13534 Quetzal Lane
            >
            Houston, TX 77083
            > C: (281) 202-9629
            > H: (281) 530-7501
            > F:
            (281) 530-7501
            > kevin@...

            No virus found in this incoming message.
            Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
            Version: 8.5.409 / Virus Database: 270.13.97/2370 - Release Date: 09/14/09 11:36:00

          • justin@gulfcoastrenewableresources.com
            Kevin, I have been doing a lot of research on the Mitsubishi Mr. Slim and I really like the efficiency of them. The SolCool unit we saw on Saturday was set up
            Message 5 of 14 , Sep 14, 2009
            • 0 Attachment
              Kevin,
               
              I have been doing a lot of research on the Mitsubishi Mr. Slim and I really like the efficiency of them. The SolCool unit we saw on Saturday was set up in a similar fashion, just run by beautiful solar power. How would you say the Mr. Slim works by comparison to standard ductwork systems? I'm also curious as to the cost comparison as well.
               
              As to the HOA, I've noticed several of them have slightly veered from their policy(if actually stated) and allowed collectors as long as they are not viewable from the street. This is not always a good thing, given the placement of the home, but works in some scenarios nonetheless. By mitigating the placement of collectors in "non-viewable" areas, some homeowners may still have the opportunity to proceed without any major battle. You said it right... educating those involved is the best thing we can do.
               
              Best Regards,
               
              Justin Owens
              Gulf Coast Renewable Resources
              (409)766-0208
              www.GulfCoastRenewableResources.com
               
               
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Monday, September 14, 2009 3:30 PM
              Subject: RE: [hreg] Re: HREG Solar Air Conditioning Tour Recap

               

              Hi Jay,  Good question, no one asked about the filter, but I'm guessing it does have a washable one inside the unit.
               
              I agree, between no duct work, selective cooling and high efficiency, I too believe they are the next wave.  Problem is finding anyone willing to learn the technology.  It took me 3 months to find a cooperative ac contractor as we just installed a 2 zone Mitsubishi Mr.. Slim on our community clubhouse.  Every one tried to talk me into ductwork.
               
              Since solar panels are not specifically excluded in deed restrictions, it might be worth educating the architectural committee on your homeowners BOD.
              Traditionally the courts have ruled in favor of the homeowners when solar is challenged, but most people don't want that fight.
               
              Best Regards,  Kevin
               
              Kevin Conlin
              Heliosolar Design, Inc.
              13534 Quetzal Lane
              Houston, TX 77083
              C:  (281) 202-9629
              H:  (281) 530-7501
              F:  (281) 530-7501
               
               
               


              From: hreg@yahoogroups. com [mailto:hreg@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of jay.ring@ymail. com
              Sent: Monday, September 14, 2009 10:01 AM
              To: hreg@yahoogroups. com
              Subject: [hreg] Re: HREG Solar Air Conditioning Tour Recap

               

              That was a great summery, very detailed. Thanks Kevin!

              I was planning on going, I was very disappointed to miss it.

              These split systems seem to be the way forward, at least for the energy/cost conscious crowd. The part about only cooling the part of the house that is occupied is huge!

              The part about the HOA is really disappointing, and continues to be disappointing. For the life of me I can not understand why people wouldn't want them in the neighborhood. This is something I think we can all work on.

              One question I have is about air filtration. Everyone knows how it gets filtered in a central air system. Is it just ignored in a split system, or part of the per-room unit? Is is an issue at all? I use washable filters to reduce waste, is something like that available?

              --- In hreg@yahoogroups. com, "Kevin Conlin" <kevin@...> wrote:
              >
              > I thought I would summarize the tour for those who couldn't make it.
              >
              > Milton and his wife Pat were very gracious hosting about 40 people. The
              > indoor unit was very quiet and even featured emergency lights for power
              > outages that run off the battery bank. It uses a convenient wireless remote
              > rather than a conventional thermostat
              >
              > The outdoor unit was also extremely quiet, you could talk in a normal tone
              > of voice even while standing right next to it. It seemed very large for a
              > 1.5 ton condenser, so I'm guessing one way they make it so efficient is with
              > a larger than normal heat exchanger. The fan was whisper quiet. The system
              > does have provisions for 120VAC input, using the grid for backup gets you
              > the best of both worlds.
              >
              > Milton's approach is too leave the 120VAC unplugged, as his intention is to
              > use every bit of solar for cooling. He sees the system as a long term hedge
              > against rising utility costs, ignoring what might be calculated as payback.
              > He enjoys the satisfaction of offsetting his utility bill with his solar
              > system, and hopes to expand it in the future by adding another 1.5 ton unit.
              > It should be noted that the complete system does qualify for the 30% federal
              > tax credit, although in his case he had to "educate" the IRS a bit. (Good
              > thing he was a former teacher)
              >
              > The real beauty of the system is you only cool the portion of your house
              > that is occupied, especially effective at night. This strategy alone offers
              > utility savings.
              >
              > Four Sanyo 200W modules were mounted on a sturdy rack along the back fence,
              > as their home faces South and the HOA will not allow solar panels. Conduit
              > was run underground and was very clean, additional conduit for possible
              > future expansion was also installed, showing good forethought.
              >
              > The modules are very high efficiency, they feature an amorphous silicon
              > coating which raises their efficiency several points. They are preferred
              > where space is at a premium and maximum power density is needed.
              >
              > Milton is using an Outback MPPT controller, or Maximum Power Point Tracking,
              > which is a very good way to use higher voltage modules to charge a battery
              > bank. It is essentially a very efficient DC/DC converter which constantly
              > optimizes battery charging to get the most out of the solar array. Again,
              > there is also plenty of room for expansion, and the digital display gives
              > system status at a glance.
              >
              > Batteries are the old favorite, Trojan T-105's , 6V, 220Ah golf cart
              > batteries, which are the best battery you can get for the buck. They will
              > outlast gel batteries and cost half as much. They were safely installed in a
              > ventilated Rubbermaid storage bin with a temperature controlled fan.
              >
              > Overall the system was well done and safe.
              >
              > The thing that impressed me the most is because of the relatively low power
              > draw and DC operation, this is the first AC unit I have seen that is
              > suitable for use with a battery based backup system. In the event of a
              > hurricane or extended power outage, a portion of your home will have air
              > conditioning. It would also be perfect for a small off grid cabin or beach
              > house.
              >
              > The unit seemed to be well built and well thought out. With quiet
              > operation, no duct work and super high efficiency, it seems like a good
              > product whose time has come. This coming from a curmudgeon!
              >
              > The tour was followed by a friendly happy hour at Las Rosas Mexican
              > Restaurant, where topics from Permaculture to Driver Ed were discussed. A
              > good time was had by all.
              >
              > Thank you both Milton and Pat for opening your home and sharing your
              > knowledge with us!
              >
              >
              > Kevin Conlin
              > Heliosolar Design, Inc.
              > 13534 Quetzal Lane
              > Houston, TX 77083
              > C: (281) 202-9629
              > H: (281) 530-7501
              > F: (281) 530-7501
              > kevin@...

              No virus found in this incoming message.
              Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
              Version: 8.5.409 / Virus Database: 270.13.97/2370 - Release Date: 09/14/09 11:36:00

            • Kevin Conlin
              Hi Justin, We just now finished installing the Mr.. Slim, but because our clubhouse is used infrequently, I really don t know how it would stack up. We
              Message 6 of 14 , Sep 14, 2009
              • 0 Attachment
                Hi Justin, We just now finished installing the Mr.. Slim, but because our clubhouse is used infrequently, I really don't know how it would stack up. We replaced an old window unit, which was noisy, inefficient, and ironically, prohibited by our deed restrictions.
                 
                We bought a 2 zone, 24000BTU Mr. Slim heat pump with wall mounting bracket and two sets of precharged lines for the 2 zones for under $3,000. It cost us another $1,000 to have it installed.  Ducted systems were in the $5000 range and up, so lower installation costs and lower operating costs, no air handler, no ductwork and no noise.
                 
                The condenser on the SolCool was quite a bit larger than the Mr. Slim, even though it is of smaller capacity, so as I mentioned, I think they have increased the heat exchanger size to squeeze more efficiency out of it. I think the Mr. Slim is about a 16 SEER, and the SolCool was advertised at over 20.
                 
                I just like the idea of not having ducts and their associated problems and heat losses in a hot attic. This unit is also very quiet and I like the remote controls better than a wall mount thermostat, but that may be a guy thing, we tend to love remote controls......
                 
                Hope this helps, you're welcome to see our system any time if you wish.
                 
                Regards,  Kevin
                 
                Kevin Conlin
                Heliosolar Design, Inc.
                13534 Quetzal Lane
                Houston, TX 77083
                C:  (281) 202-9629
                H:  (281) 530-7501
                F:  (281) 530-7501
                 
                 
                 


                From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hreg@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of justin@...
                Sent: Monday, September 14, 2009 3:49 PM
                To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [hreg] Re: HREG Solar Air Conditioning Tour Recap

                 

                Kevin,
                 
                I have been doing a lot of research on the Mitsubishi Mr. Slim and I really like the efficiency of them. The SolCool unit we saw on Saturday was set up in a similar fashion, just run by beautiful solar power. How would you say the Mr. Slim works by comparison to standard ductwork systems? I'm also curious as to the cost comparison as well.
                 
                As to the HOA, I've noticed several of them have slightly veered from their policy(if actually stated) and allowed collectors as long as they are not viewable from the street. This is not always a good thing, given the placement of the home, but works in some scenarios nonetheless. By mitigating the placement of collectors in "non-viewable" areas, some homeowners may still have the opportunity to proceed without any major battle. You said it right... educating those involved is the best thing we can do.
                 
                Best Regards,
                 
                Justin Owens
                Gulf Coast Renewable Resources
                (409)766-0208
                www.GulfCoastRenewa bleResources. com
                 
                 
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Monday, September 14, 2009 3:30 PM
                Subject: RE: [hreg] Re: HREG Solar Air Conditioning Tour Recap

                 

                Hi Jay,  Good question, no one asked about the filter, but I'm guessing it does have a washable one inside the unit.
                 
                I agree, between no duct work, selective cooling and high efficiency, I too believe they are the next wave.  Problem is finding anyone willing to learn the technology.  It took me 3 months to find a cooperative ac contractor as we just installed a 2 zone Mitsubishi Mr.. Slim on our community clubhouse.  Every one tried to talk me into ductwork.
                 
                Since solar panels are not specifically excluded in deed restrictions, it might be worth educating the architectural committee on your homeowners BOD.
                Traditionally the courts have ruled in favor of the homeowners when solar is challenged, but most people don't want that fight.
                 
                Best Regards,  Kevin
                 
                Kevin Conlin
                Heliosolar Design, Inc.
                13534 Quetzal Lane
                Houston, TX 77083
                C:  (281) 202-9629
                H:  (281) 530-7501
                F:  (281) 530-7501
                 
                 
                 


                From: hreg@yahoogroups. com [mailto:hreg@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of jay.ring@ymail. com
                Sent: Monday, September 14, 2009 10:01 AM
                To: hreg@yahoogroups. com
                Subject: [hreg] Re: HREG Solar Air Conditioning Tour Recap

                 

                That was a great summery, very detailed. Thanks Kevin!

                I was planning on going, I was very disappointed to miss it.

                These split systems seem to be the way forward, at least for the energy/cost conscious crowd. The part about only cooling the part of the house that is occupied is huge!

                The part about the HOA is really disappointing, and continues to be disappointing. For the life of me I can not understand why people wouldn't want them in the neighborhood. This is something I think we can all work on.

                One question I have is about air filtration. Everyone knows how it gets filtered in a central air system. Is it just ignored in a split system, or part of the per-room unit? Is is an issue at all? I use washable filters to reduce waste, is something like that available?

                --- In hreg@yahoogroups. com, "Kevin Conlin" <kevin@...> wrote:
                >
                > I thought I would summarize the tour for those who couldn't make it.
                >
                > Milton and his wife Pat were very gracious hosting about 40 people. The
                > indoor unit was very quiet and even featured emergency lights for power
                > outages that run off the battery bank. It uses a convenient wireless remote
                > rather than a conventional thermostat
                >
                > The outdoor unit was also extremely quiet, you could talk in a normal tone
                > of voice even while standing right next to it. It seemed very large for a
                > 1.5 ton condenser, so I'm guessing one way they make it so efficient is with
                > a larger than normal heat exchanger. The fan was whisper quiet. The system
                > does have provisions for 120VAC input, using the grid for backup gets you
                > the best of both worlds.
                >
                > Milton's approach is too leave the 120VAC unplugged, as his intention is to
                > use every bit of solar for cooling. He sees the system as a long term hedge
                > against rising utility costs, ignoring what might be calculated as payback.
                > He enjoys the satisfaction of offsetting his utility bill with his solar
                > system, and hopes to expand it in the future by adding another 1.5 ton unit.
                > It should be noted that the complete system does qualify for the 30% federal
                > tax credit, although in his case he had to "educate" the IRS a bit. (Good
                > thing he was a former teacher)
                >
                > The real beauty of the system is you only cool the portion of your house
                > that is occupied, especially effective at night. This strategy alone offers
                > utility savings.
                >
                > Four Sanyo 200W modules were mounted on a sturdy rack along the back fence,
                > as their home faces South and the HOA will not allow solar panels. Conduit
                > was run underground and was very clean, additional conduit for possible
                > future expansion was also installed, showing good forethought.
                >
                > The modules are very high efficiency, they feature an amorphous silicon
                > coating which raises their efficiency several points. They are preferred
                > where space is at a premium and maximum power density is needed.
                >
                > Milton is using an Outback MPPT controller, or Maximum Power Point Tracking,
                > which is a very good way to use higher voltage modules to charge a battery
                > bank. It is essentially a very efficient DC/DC converter which constantly
                > optimizes battery charging to get the most out of the solar array. Again,
                > there is also plenty of room for expansion, and the digital display gives
                > system status at a glance.
                >
                > Batteries are the old favorite, Trojan T-105's , 6V, 220Ah golf cart
                > batteries, which are the best battery you can get for the buck. They will
                > outlast gel batteries and cost half as much. They were safely installed in a
                > ventilated Rubbermaid storage bin with a temperature controlled fan.
                >
                > Overall the system was well done and safe.
                >
                > The thing that impressed me the most is because of the relatively low power
                > draw and DC operation, this is the first AC unit I have seen that is
                > suitable for use with a battery based backup system. In the event of a
                > hurricane or extended power outage, a portion of your home will have air
                > conditioning. It would also be perfect for a small off grid cabin or beach
                > house.
                >
                > The unit seemed to be well built and well thought out. With quiet
                > operation, no duct work and super high efficiency, it seems like a good
                > product whose time has come. This coming from a curmudgeon!
                >
                > The tour was followed by a friendly happy hour at Las Rosas Mexican
                > Restaurant, where topics from Permaculture to Driver Ed were discussed. A
                > good time was had by all.
                >
                > Thank you both Milton and Pat for opening your home and sharing your
                > knowledge with us!
                >
                >
                > Kevin Conlin
                > Heliosolar Design, Inc.
                > 13534 Quetzal Lane
                > Houston, TX 77083
                > C: (281) 202-9629
                > H: (281) 530-7501
                > F: (281) 530-7501
                > kevin@...

                No virus found in this incoming message.
                Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                Version: 8.5.409 / Virus Database: 270.13.97/2370 - Release Date: 09/14/09 11:36:00

                No virus found in this incoming message.
                Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                Version: 8.5.409 / Virus Database: 270.13.97/2370 - Release Date: 09/14/09 11:36:00

              • justin@gulfcoastrenewableresources.com
                Thanks Kevin...that information is very helpful. Here are some pictures my wife took from Saturday night. I hope I m attaching these correctly... Some of you
                Message 7 of 14 , Sep 14, 2009
                • 0 Attachment
                  Thanks Kevin...that information is very helpful.
                   
                  Here are some pictures my wife took from Saturday night. I hope I'm attaching these correctly...
                   
                  Some of you may even be in them.
                   
                   
                   
                   
                  -Justin
                   
                  Justin Owens
                  Gulf Coast Renewable Resources
                  (409)766-0208
                  www.GulfCoastRenewableResources.com
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  Sent: Monday, September 14, 2009 4:36 PM
                  Subject: RE: [hreg] Re: HREG Solar Air Conditioning Tour Recap

                   

                  Hi Justin, We just now finished installing the Mr.. Slim, but because our clubhouse is used infrequently, I really don't know how it would stack up. We replaced an old window unit, which was noisy, inefficient, and ironically, prohibited by our deed restrictions.
                   
                  We bought a 2 zone, 24000BTU Mr. Slim heat pump with wall mounting bracket and two sets of precharged lines for the 2 zones for under $3,000. It cost us another $1,000 to have it installed.  Ducted systems were in the $5000 range and up, so lower installation costs and lower operating costs, no air handler, no ductwork and no noise.
                   
                  The condenser on the SolCool was quite a bit larger than the Mr. Slim, even though it is of smaller capacity, so as I mentioned, I think they have increased the heat exchanger size to squeeze more efficiency out of it. I think the Mr. Slim is about a 16 SEER, and the SolCool was advertised at over 20.
                   
                  I just like the idea of not having ducts and their associated problems and heat losses in a hot attic. This unit is also very quiet and I like the remote controls better than a wall mount thermostat, but that may be a guy thing, we tend to love remote controls.... ..
                   
                  Hope this helps, you're welcome to see our system any time if you wish.
                   
                  Regards,  Kevin
                   
                  Kevin Conlin
                  Heliosolar Design, Inc.
                  13534 Quetzal Lane
                  Houston, TX 77083
                  C:  (281) 202-9629
                  H:  (281) 530-7501
                  F:  (281) 530-7501
                   
                   
                   


                  From: hreg@yahoogroups. com [mailto:hreg@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of justin@gulfcoastren ewableresources. com
                  Sent: Monday, September 14, 2009 3:49 PM
                  To: hreg@yahoogroups. com
                  Subject: Re: [hreg] Re: HREG Solar Air Conditioning Tour Recap

                   

                  Kevin,
                   
                  I have been doing a lot of research on the Mitsubishi Mr. Slim and I really like the efficiency of them. The SolCool unit we saw on Saturday was set up in a similar fashion, just run by beautiful solar power. How would you say the Mr. Slim works by comparison to standard ductwork systems? I'm also curious as to the cost comparison as well.
                   
                  As to the HOA, I've noticed several of them have slightly veered from their policy(if actually stated) and allowed collectors as long as they are not viewable from the street. This is not always a good thing, given the placement of the home, but works in some scenarios nonetheless. By mitigating the placement of collectors in "non-viewable" areas, some homeowners may still have the opportunity to proceed without any major battle. You said it right... educating those involved is the best thing we can do.
                   
                  Best Regards,
                   
                  Justin Owens
                  Gulf Coast Renewable Resources
                  (409)766-0208
                  www.GulfCoastRenewa bleResources. com
                   
                   
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  Sent: Monday, September 14, 2009 3:30 PM
                  Subject: RE: [hreg] Re: HREG Solar Air Conditioning Tour Recap

                   

                  Hi Jay,  Good question, no one asked about the filter, but I'm guessing it does have a washable one inside the unit.
                   
                  I agree, between no duct work, selective cooling and high efficiency, I too believe they are the next wave.  Problem is finding anyone willing to learn the technology.  It took me 3 months to find a cooperative ac contractor as we just installed a 2 zone Mitsubishi Mr.. Slim on our community clubhouse.  Every one tried to talk me into ductwork.
                   
                  Since solar panels are not specifically excluded in deed restrictions, it might be worth educating the architectural committee on your homeowners BOD.
                  Traditionally the courts have ruled in favor of the homeowners when solar is challenged, but most people don't want that fight.
                   
                  Best Regards,  Kevin
                   
                  Kevin Conlin
                  Heliosolar Design, Inc.
                  13534 Quetzal Lane
                  Houston, TX 77083
                  C:  (281) 202-9629
                  H:  (281) 530-7501
                  F:  (281) 530-7501
                   
                   
                   


                  From: hreg@yahoogroups. com [mailto:hreg@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of jay.ring@ymail. com
                  Sent: Monday, September 14, 2009 10:01 AM
                  To: hreg@yahoogroups. com
                  Subject: [hreg] Re: HREG Solar Air Conditioning Tour Recap

                   

                  That was a great summery, very detailed. Thanks Kevin!

                  I was planning on going, I was very disappointed to miss it.

                  These split systems seem to be the way forward, at least for the energy/cost conscious crowd. The part about only cooling the part of the house that is occupied is huge!

                  The part about the HOA is really disappointing, and continues to be disappointing. For the life of me I can not understand why people wouldn't want them in the neighborhood. This is something I think we can all work on.

                  One question I have is about air filtration. Everyone knows how it gets filtered in a central air system. Is it just ignored in a split system, or part of the per-room unit? Is is an issue at all? I use washable filters to reduce waste, is something like that available?

                  --- In hreg@yahoogroups. com, "Kevin Conlin" <kevin@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I thought I would summarize the tour for those who couldn't make it.
                  >
                  > Milton and his wife Pat were very gracious hosting about 40 people. The
                  > indoor unit was very quiet and even featured emergency lights for power
                  > outages that run off the battery bank. It uses a convenient wireless remote
                  > rather than a conventional thermostat
                  >
                  > The outdoor unit was also extremely quiet, you could talk in a normal tone
                  > of voice even while standing right next to it. It seemed very large for a
                  > 1.5 ton condenser, so I'm guessing one way they make it so efficient is with
                  > a larger than normal heat exchanger. The fan was whisper quiet. The system
                  > does have provisions for 120VAC input, using the grid for backup gets you
                  > the best of both worlds.
                  >
                  > Milton's approach is too leave the 120VAC unplugged, as his intention is to
                  > use every bit of solar for cooling. He sees the system as a long term hedge
                  > against rising utility costs, ignoring what might be calculated as payback.
                  > He enjoys the satisfaction of offsetting his utility bill with his solar
                  > system, and hopes to expand it in the future by adding another 1.5 ton unit.
                  > It should be noted that the complete system does qualify for the 30% federal
                  > tax credit, although in his case he had to "educate" the IRS a bit. (Good
                  > thing he was a former teacher)
                  >
                  > The real beauty of the system is you only cool the portion of your house
                  > that is occupied, especially effective at night. This strategy alone offers
                  > utility savings.
                  >
                  > Four Sanyo 200W modules were mounted on a sturdy rack along the back fence,
                  > as their home faces South and the HOA will not allow solar panels. Conduit
                  > was run underground and was very clean, additional conduit for possible
                  > future expansion was also installed, showing good forethought.
                  >
                  > The modules are very high efficiency, they feature an amorphous silicon
                  > coating which raises their efficiency several points. They are preferred
                  > where space is at a premium and maximum power density is needed.
                  >
                  > Milton is using an Outback MPPT controller, or Maximum Power Point Tracking,
                  > which is a very good way to use higher voltage modules to charge a battery
                  > bank. It is essentially a very efficient DC/DC converter which constantly
                  > optimizes battery charging to get the most out of the solar array. Again,
                  > there is also plenty of room for expansion, and the digital display gives
                  > system status at a glance.
                  >
                  > Batteries are the old favorite, Trojan T-105's , 6V, 220Ah golf cart
                  > batteries, which are the best battery you can get for the buck. They will
                  > outlast gel batteries and cost half as much. They were safely installed in a
                  > ventilated Rubbermaid storage bin with a temperature controlled fan.
                  >
                  > Overall the system was well done and safe.
                  >
                  > The thing that impressed me the most is because of the relatively low power
                  > draw and DC operation, this is the first AC unit I have seen that is
                  > suitable for use with a battery based backup system. In the event of a
                  > hurricane or extended power outage, a portion of your home will have air
                  > conditioning. It would also be perfect for a small off grid cabin or beach
                  > house.
                  >
                  > The unit seemed to be well built and well thought out. With quiet
                  > operation, no duct work and super high efficiency, it seems like a good
                  > product whose time has come. This coming from a curmudgeon!
                  >
                  > The tour was followed by a friendly happy hour at Las Rosas Mexican
                  > Restaurant, where topics from Permaculture to Driver Ed were discussed. A
                  > good time was had by all.
                  >
                  > Thank you both Milton and Pat for opening your home and sharing your
                  > knowledge with us!
                  >
                  >
                  > Kevin Conlin
                  > Heliosolar Design, Inc.
                  > 13534 Quetzal Lane
                  > Houston, TX 77083
                  > C: (281) 202-9629
                  > H: (281) 530-7501
                  > F: (281) 530-7501
                  > kevin@...

                  No virus found in this incoming message.
                  Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                  Version: 8.5.409 / Virus Database: 270.13.97/2370 - Release Date: 09/14/09 11:36:00

                  No virus found in this incoming message.
                  Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                  Version: 8.5.409 / Virus Database: 270.13.97/2370 - Release Date: 09/14/09 11:36:00

                • Susan Silvano
                  Although my company is headquartered in Houston, we live in St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands. We have built our home there, and have installed five Mr.
                  Message 8 of 14 , Sep 14, 2009
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Although my company is headquartered in Houston, we live in St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands.  We have built our home there, and have installed five Mr. Slim's in our home,  two in the apartment under our house and one in the pool cabana.  The first was installed about three years ago.  We have not had a minute's trouble with any of the units and they work great.  We got federal and territory rebates on each of the units.  The filters are easily removed and we wash them about once a quarter.  I highly recommend going in this direction vs. a ducted system - much cheaper and more efficient as we very rarely turn on all the units.

                    Now, all we have to do is figure out how to get them to work using solar.

                    Regards,

                    Susan

                    Susan Silvano
                    President
                    Career Management International, Inc.
                    713-623-8780 Corporate Office
                    713-252-0924 Cell

                    CMI. Supporting the business of people.





                    On Sep 14, 2009, at 4:30 PM, Kevin Conlin wrote:


                    Hi Jay,  Good question, no one asked about the filter, but I'm guessing it does have a washable one inside the unit.
                     
                    I agree, between no duct work, selective cooling and high efficiency, I too believe they are the next wave.  Problem is finding anyone willing to learn the technology.  It took me 3 months to find a cooperative ac contractor as we just installed a 2 zone Mitsubishi Mr.. Slim on our community clubhouse.  Every one tried to talk me into ductwork.
                     
                    Since solar panels are not specifically excluded in deed restrictions, it might be worth educating the architectural committee on your homeowners BOD.
                    Traditionally the courts have ruled in favor of the homeowners when solar is challenged, but most people don't want that fight.
                     
                    Best Regards,  Kevin
                     
                    Kevin Conlin
                    Heliosolar Design, Inc.
                    13534 Quetzal Lane
                    Houston, TX 77083
                    C:  (281) 202-9629
                    H:  (281) 530-7501
                    F:  (281) 530-7501
                     
                     
                     


                    From: hreg@yahoogroups. com [mailto:hreg@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of jay.ring@ymail. com
                    Sent: Monday, September 14, 2009 10:01 AM
                    To: hreg@yahoogroups. com
                    Subject: [hreg] Re: HREG Solar Air Conditioning Tour Recap

                     

                    That was a great summery, very detailed. Thanks Kevin!

                    I was planning on going, I was very disappointed to miss it.

                    These split systems seem to be the way forward, at least for the energy/cost conscious crowd. The part about only cooling the part of the house that is occupied is huge!

                    The part about the HOA is really disappointing, and continues to be disappointing. For the life of me I can not understand why people wouldn't want them in the neighborhood. This is something I think we can all work on.

                    One question I have is about air filtration. Everyone knows how it gets filtered in a central air system. Is it just ignored in a split system, or part of the per-room unit? Is is an issue at all? I use washable filters to reduce waste, is something like that available?

                    --- In hreg@yahoogroups. com, "Kevin Conlin" <kevin@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I thought I would summarize the tour for those who couldn't make it.
                    > 
                    > Milton and his wife Pat were very gracious hosting about 40 people. The
                    > indoor unit was very quiet and even featured emergency lights for power
                    > outages that run off the battery bank. It uses a convenient wireless remote
                    > rather than a conventional thermostat
                    > 
                    > The outdoor unit was also extremely quiet, you could talk in a normal tone
                    > of voice even while standing right next to it. It seemed very large for a
                    > 1.5 ton condenser, so I'm guessing one way they make it so efficient is with
                    > a larger than normal heat exchanger. The fan was whisper quiet. The system
                    > does have provisions for 120VAC input, using the grid for backup gets you
                    > the best of both worlds.
                    > 
                    > Milton's approach is too leave the 120VAC unplugged, as his intention is to
                    > use every bit of solar for cooling. He sees the system as a long term hedge
                    > against rising utility costs, ignoring what might be calculated as payback.
                    > He enjoys the satisfaction of offsetting his utility bill with his solar
                    > system, and hopes to expand it in the future by adding another 1.5 ton unit.
                    > It should be noted that the complete system does qualify for the 30% federal
                    > tax credit, although in his case he had to "educate" the IRS a bit. (Good
                    > thing he was a former teacher)
                    > 
                    > The real beauty of the system is you only cool the portion of your house
                    > that is occupied, especially effective at night. This strategy alone offers
                    > utility savings.
                    > 
                    > Four Sanyo 200W modules were mounted on a sturdy rack along the back fence,
                    > as their home faces South and the HOA will not allow solar panels. Conduit
                    > was run underground and was very clean, additional conduit for possible
                    > future expansion was also installed, showing good forethought.
                    > 
                    > The modules are very high efficiency, they feature an amorphous silicon
                    > coating which raises their efficiency several points. They are preferred
                    > where space is at a premium and maximum power density is needed.
                    > 
                    > Milton is using an Outback MPPT controller, or Maximum Power Point Tracking,
                    > which is a very good way to use higher voltage modules to charge a battery
                    > bank. It is essentially a very efficient DC/DC converter which constantly
                    > optimizes battery charging to get the most out of the solar array. Again,
                    > there is also plenty of room for expansion, and the digital display gives
                    > system status at a glance.
                    > 
                    > Batteries are the old favorite, Trojan T-105's , 6V, 220Ah golf cart
                    > batteries, which are the best battery you can get for the buck. They will
                    > outlast gel batteries and cost half as much. They were safely installed in a
                    > ventilated Rubbermaid storage bin with a temperature controlled fan. 
                    > 
                    > Overall the system was well done and safe.
                    > 
                    > The thing that impressed me the most is because of the relatively low power
                    > draw and DC operation, this is the first AC unit I have seen that is
                    > suitable for use with a battery based backup system. In the event of a
                    > hurricane or extended power outage, a portion of your home will have air
                    > conditioning. It would also be perfect for a small off grid cabin or beach
                    > house.
                    > 
                    > The unit seemed to be well built and well thought out. With quiet
                    > operation, no duct work and super high efficiency, it seems like a good
                    > product whose time has come. This coming from a curmudgeon!
                    > 
                    > The tour was followed by a friendly happy hour at Las Rosas Mexican
                    > Restaurant, where topics from Permaculture to Driver Ed were discussed. A
                    > good time was had by all.
                    > 
                    > Thank you both Milton and Pat for opening your home and sharing your
                    > knowledge with us!
                    > 
                    > 
                    > Kevin Conlin
                    > Heliosolar Design, Inc.
                    > 13534 Quetzal Lane
                    > Houston, TX 77083
                    > C: (281) 202-9629
                    > H: (281) 530-7501
                    > F: (281) 530-7501
                    > kevin@...

                    No virus found in this incoming message.
                    Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                    Version: 8.5.409 / Virus Database: 270.13.97/2370 - Release Date: 09/14/09 11:36:00



                  • Sue
                    Hello my old friend contact me at slehrer@raintube.com Sent from my iPhone On Sep 14, 2009, at 8:45 PM, Susan Silvano
                    Message 9 of 14 , Sep 14, 2009
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Hello my old friend contact me at slehrer@...

                      Sent from my iPhone

                      On Sep 14, 2009, at 8:45 PM, Susan Silvano <susans@...> wrote:

                       

                      Although my company is headquartered in Houston, we live in St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands.  We have built our home there, and have installed five Mr. Slim's in our home,  two in the apartment under our house and one in the pool cabana.  The first was installed about three years ago.  We have not had a minute's trouble with any of the units and they work great.  We got federal and territory rebates on each of the units.  The filters are easily removed and we wash them about once a quarter.  I highly recommend going in this direction vs. a ducted system - much cheaper and more efficient as we very rarely turn on all the units.


                      Now, all we have to do is figure out how to get them to work using solar.

                      Regards,

                      Susan

                      Susan Silvano
                      President
                      Career Management International, Inc.
                      713-623-8780 Corporate Office
                      713-252-0924 Cell

                      CMI. Supporting the business of people.





                      On Sep 14, 2009, at 4:30 PM, Kevin Conlin wrote:


                      Hi Jay,  Good question, no one asked about the filter, but I'm guessing it does have a washable one inside the unit.
                       
                      I agree, between no duct work, selective cooling and high efficiency, I too believe they are the next wave.  Problem is finding anyone willing to learn the technology.  It took me 3 months to find a cooperative ac contractor as we just installed a 2 zone Mitsubishi Mr.. Slim on our community clubhouse.  Every one tried to talk me into ductwork.
                       
                      Since solar panels are not specifically excluded in deed restrictions, it might be worth educating the architectural committee on your homeowners BOD.
                      Traditionally the courts have ruled in favor of the homeowners when solar is challenged, but most people don't want that fight.
                       
                      Best Regards,  Kevin
                       
                      Kevin Conlin
                      Heliosolar Design, Inc.
                      13534 Quetzal Lane
                      Houston, TX 77083
                      C:  (281) 202-9629
                      H:  (281) 530-7501
                      F:  (281) 530-7501
                       
                       
                       


                      From: hreg@yahoogroups. com [mailto:hreg@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of jay.ring@ymail. com
                      Sent: Monday, September 14, 2009 10:01 AM
                      To: hreg@yahoogroups. com
                      Subject: [hreg] Re: HREG Solar Air Conditioning Tour Recap

                       

                      That was a great summery, very detailed. Thanks Kevin!

                      I was planning on going, I was very disappointed to miss it.

                      These split systems seem to be the way forward, at least for the energy/cost conscious crowd. The part about only cooling the part of the house that is occupied is huge!

                      The part about the HOA is really disappointing, and continues to be disappointing. For the life of me I can not understand why people wouldn't want them in the neighborhood. This is something I think we can all work on.

                      One question I have is about air filtration. Everyone knows how it gets filtered in a central air system. Is it just ignored in a split system, or part of the per-room unit? Is is an issue at all? I use washable filters to reduce waste, is something like that available?

                      --- In hreg@yahoogroups. com, "Kevin Conlin" <kevin@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > I thought I would summarize the tour for those who couldn't make it.
                      > 
                      > Milton and his wife Pat were very gracious hosting about 40 people. The
                      > indoor unit was very quiet and even featured emergency lights for power
                      > outages that run off the battery bank. It uses a convenient wireless remote
                      > rather than a conventional thermostat
                      > 
                      > The outdoor unit was also extremely quiet, you could talk in a normal tone
                      > of voice even while standing right next to it. It seemed very large for a
                      > 1.5 ton condenser, so I'm guessing one way they make it so efficient is with
                      > a larger than normal heat exchanger. The fan was whisper quiet. The system
                      > does have provisions for 120VAC input, using the grid for backup gets you
                      > the best of both worlds.
                      > 
                      > Milton's approach is too leave the 120VAC unplugged, as his intention is to
                      > use every bit of solar for cooling. He sees the system as a long term hedge
                      > against rising utility costs, ignoring what might be calculated as payback.
                      > He enjoys the satisfaction of offsetting his utility bill with his solar
                      > system, and hopes to expand it in the future by adding another 1.5 ton unit.
                      > It should be noted that the complete system does qualify for the 30% federal
                      > tax credit, although in his case he had to "educate" the IRS a bit. (Good
                      > thing he was a former teacher)
                      > 
                      > The real beauty of the system is you only cool the portion of your house
                      > that is occupied, especially effective at night. This strategy alone offers
                      > utility savings.
                      > 
                      > Four Sanyo 200W modules were mounted on a sturdy rack along the back fence,
                      > as their home faces South and the HOA will not allow solar panels. Conduit
                      > was run underground and was very clean, additional conduit for possible
                      > future expansion was also installed, showing good forethought.
                      > 
                      > The modules are very high efficiency, they feature an amorphous silicon
                      > coating which raises their efficiency several points. They are preferred
                      > where space is at a premium and maximum power density is needed.
                      > 
                      > Milton is using an Outback MPPT controller, or Maximum Power Point Tracking,
                      > which is a very good way to use higher voltage modules to charge a battery
                      > bank. It is essentially a very efficient DC/DC converter which constantly
                      > optimizes battery charging to get the most out of the solar array. Again,
                      > there is also plenty of room for expansion, and the digital display gives
                      > system status at a glance.
                      > 
                      > Batteries are the old favorite, Trojan T-105's , 6V, 220Ah golf cart
                      > batteries, which are the best battery you can get for the buck. They will
                      > outlast gel batteries and cost half as much. They were safely installed in a
                      > ventilated Rubbermaid storage bin with a temperature controlled fan. 
                      > 
                      > Overall the system was well done and safe.
                      > 
                      > The thing that impressed me the most is because of the relatively low power
                      > draw and DC operation, this is the first AC unit I have seen that is
                      > suitable for use with a battery based backup system. In the event of a
                      > hurricane or extended power outage, a portion of your home will have air
                      > conditioning. It would also be perfect for a small off grid cabin or beach
                      > house.
                      > 
                      > The unit seemed to be well built and well thought out. With quiet
                      > operation, no duct work and super high efficiency, it seems like a good
                      > product whose time has come. This coming from a curmudgeon!
                      > 
                      > The tour was followed by a friendly happy hour at Las Rosas Mexican
                      > Restaurant, where topics from Permaculture to Driver Ed were discussed. A
                      > good time was had by all.
                      > 
                      > Thank you both Milton and Pat for opening your home and sharing your
                      > knowledge with us!
                      > 
                      > 
                      > Kevin Conlin
                      > Heliosolar Design, Inc.
                      > 13534 Quetzal Lane
                      > Houston, TX 77083
                      > C: (281) 202-9629
                      > H: (281) 530-7501
                      > F: (281) 530-7501
                      > kevin@...

                      No virus found in this incoming message.
                      Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                      Version: 8.5.409 / Virus Database: 270.13.97/2370 - Release Date: 09/14/09 11:36:00



                    • Kevin Conlin
                      My contractor just finished installing a two zone heat pump Mr. Slim in our community clubhouse, and the only way you can tell if they re on is by the LED s.
                      Message 10 of 14 , Sep 14, 2009
                      • 0 Attachment
                        My contractor just finished installing a two zone heat pump Mr. Slim in our community clubhouse, and the only way you can tell if they're on is by the LED's.  The indoor units are 3 speed, which is a nice feature, but even on high, the ceiling fans make more noise. Even the outdoor unit is barely audible.
                         
                        Kevin Conlin
                        Heliosolar Design, Inc.
                        13534 Quetzal Lane
                        Houston, TX 77083
                        C:  (281) 202-9629
                        H:  (281) 530-7501
                        F:  (281) 530-7501
                         
                         
                         


                        From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hreg@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Susan Silvano
                        Sent: Monday, September 14, 2009 7:46 PM
                        To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
                        Cc: Susan Silvano
                        Subject: Re: [hreg] Re: HREG Solar Air Conditioning Tour Recap

                         

                        Although my company is headquartered in Houston, we live in St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands.  We have built our home there, and have installed five Mr. Slim's in our home,  two in the apartment under our house and one in the pool cabana.  The first was installed about three years ago.  We have not had a minute's trouble with any of the units and they work great.  We got federal and territory rebates on each of the units.  The filters are easily removed and we wash them about once a quarter.  I highly recommend going in this direction vs. a ducted system - much cheaper and more efficient as we very rarely turn on all the units.


                        Now, all we have to do is figure out how to get them to work using solar.

                        Regards,

                        Susan

                        Susan Silvano
                        President
                        Career Management International, Inc.
                        713-623-8780 Corporate Office
                        713-252-0924 Cell

                        CMI. Supporting the business of people.





                        On Sep 14, 2009, at 4:30 PM, Kevin Conlin wrote:


                        Hi Jay,  Good question, no one asked about the filter, but I'm guessing it does have a washable one inside the unit.
                         
                        I agree, between no duct work, selective cooling and high efficiency, I too believe they are the next wave.  Problem is finding anyone willing to learn the technology.  It took me 3 months to find a cooperative ac contractor as we just installed a 2 zone Mitsubishi Mr.. Slim on our community clubhouse.  Every one tried to talk me into ductwork.
                         
                        Since solar panels are not specifically excluded in deed restrictions, it might be worth educating the architectural committee on your homeowners BOD.
                        Traditionally the courts have ruled in favor of the homeowners when solar is challenged, but most people don't want that fight.
                         
                        Best Regards,  Kevin
                         
                        Kevin Conlin
                        Heliosolar Design, Inc.
                        13534 Quetzal Lane
                        Houston, TX 77083
                        C:  (281) 202-9629
                        H:  (281) 530-7501
                        F:  (281) 530-7501
                         
                         
                         


                        From: hreg@yahoogroups. com [mailto:hreg@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of jay.ring@ymail. com
                        Sent: Monday, September 14, 2009 10:01 AM
                        To: hreg@yahoogroups. com
                        Subject: [hreg] Re: HREG Solar Air Conditioning Tour Recap

                         

                        That was a great summery, very detailed. Thanks Kevin!

                        I was planning on going, I was very disappointed to miss it.

                        These split systems seem to be the way forward, at least for the energy/cost conscious crowd. The part about only cooling the part of the house that is occupied is huge!

                        The part about the HOA is really disappointing, and continues to be disappointing. For the life of me I can not understand why people wouldn't want them in the neighborhood. This is something I think we can all work on.

                        One question I have is about air filtration. Everyone knows how it gets filtered in a central air system. Is it just ignored in a split system, or part of the per-room unit? Is is an issue at all? I use washable filters to reduce waste, is something like that available?

                        --- In hreg@yahoogroups. com, "Kevin Conlin" <kevin@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > I thought I would summarize the tour for those who couldn't make it.
                        > 
                        > Milton and his wife Pat were very gracious hosting about 40 people. The
                        > indoor unit was very quiet and even featured emergency lights for power
                        > outages that run off the battery bank. It uses a convenient wireless remote
                        > rather than a conventional thermostat
                        > 
                        > The outdoor unit was also extremely quiet, you could talk in a normal tone
                        > of voice even while standing right next to it. It seemed very large for a
                        > 1.5 ton condenser, so I'm guessing one way they make it so efficient is with
                        > a larger than normal heat exchanger. The fan was whisper quiet. The system
                        > does have provisions for 120VAC input, using the grid for backup gets you
                        > the best of both worlds.
                        > 
                        > Milton's approach is too leave the 120VAC unplugged, as his intention is to
                        > use every bit of solar for cooling. He sees the system as a long term hedge
                        > against rising utility costs, ignoring what might be calculated as payback.
                        > He enjoys the satisfaction of offsetting his utility bill with his solar
                        > system, and hopes to expand it in the future by adding another 1.5 ton unit.
                        > It should be noted that the complete system does qualify for the 30% federal
                        > tax credit, although in his case he had to "educate" the IRS a bit. (Good
                        > thing he was a former teacher)
                        > 
                        > The real beauty of the system is you only cool the portion of your house
                        > that is occupied, especially effective at night. This strategy alone offers
                        > utility savings.
                        > 
                        > Four Sanyo 200W modules were mounted on a sturdy rack along the back fence,
                        > as their home faces South and the HOA will not allow solar panels. Conduit
                        > was run underground and was very clean, additional conduit for possible
                        > future expansion was also installed, showing good forethought.
                        > 
                        > The modules are very high efficiency, they feature an amorphous silicon
                        > coating which raises their efficiency several points. They are preferred
                        > where space is at a premium and maximum power density is needed.
                        > 
                        > Milton is using an Outback MPPT controller, or Maximum Power Point Tracking,
                        > which is a very good way to use higher voltage modules to charge a battery
                        > bank. It is essentially a very efficient DC/DC converter which constantly
                        > optimizes battery charging to get the most out of the solar array. Again,
                        > there is also plenty of room for expansion, and the digital display gives
                        > system status at a glance.
                        > 
                        > Batteries are the old favorite, Trojan T-105's , 6V, 220Ah golf cart
                        > batteries, which are the best battery you can get for the buck. They will
                        > outlast gel batteries and cost half as much. They were safely installed in a
                        > ventilated Rubbermaid storage bin with a temperature controlled fan. 
                        > 
                        > Overall the system was well done and safe.
                        > 
                        > The thing that impressed me the most is because of the relatively low power
                        > draw and DC operation, this is the first AC unit I have seen that is
                        > suitable for use with a battery based backup system. In the event of a
                        > hurricane or extended power outage, a portion of your home will have air
                        > conditioning. It would also be perfect for a small off grid cabin or beach
                        > house.
                        > 
                        > The unit seemed to be well built and well thought out. With quiet
                        > operation, no duct work and super high efficiency, it seems like a good
                        > product whose time has come. This coming from a curmudgeon!
                        > 
                        > The tour was followed by a friendly happy hour at Las Rosas Mexican
                        > Restaurant, where topics from Permaculture to Driver Ed were discussed. A
                        > good time was had by all.
                        > 
                        > Thank you both Milton and Pat for opening your home and sharing your
                        > knowledge with us!
                        > 
                        > 
                        > Kevin Conlin
                        > Heliosolar Design, Inc.
                        > 13534 Quetzal Lane
                        > Houston, TX 77083
                        > C: (281) 202-9629
                        > H: (281) 530-7501
                        > F: (281) 530-7501
                        > kevin@...

                        No virus found in this incoming message.
                        Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                        Version: 8.5.409 / Virus Database: 270.13.97/2370 - Release Date: 09/14/09 11:36:00



                        No virus found in this incoming message.
                        Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                        Version: 8.5.409 / Virus Database: 270.13.97/2370 - Release Date: 09/14/09 11:36:00

                      • jay.ring@ymail.com
                        I know Sanyo and LG make models too, but I can t tell if they are different or just rebrands. I would love some sort of break down. Next up someone needs to
                        Message 11 of 14 , Sep 14, 2009
                        • 0 Attachment
                          I know Sanyo and LG make models too, but I can't tell if they are different or just rebrands. I would love some sort of break down.

                          Next up someone needs to design one of these crossed with a ground source heat pump :)

                          Is the Mr Slim DC powered, or AC only? I am not against AC powered, there is a lot of convenience there for code compliance, but for solar, the whole DC to AC to DC and then back to AC seems a little much...

                          There is another good push we could all work on - update the N.E.C. to be DC friendlier!




                          --- In hreg@yahoogroups.com, "Kevin Conlin" <kevin@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > My contractor just finished installing a two zone heat pump Mr. Slim in our
                          > community clubhouse, and the only way you can tell if they're on is by the
                          > LED's. The indoor units are 3 speed, which is a nice feature, but even on
                          > high, the ceiling fans make more noise. Even the outdoor unit is barely
                          > audible.
                          >
                          > Kevin Conlin
                          > Heliosolar Design, Inc.
                          > 13534 Quetzal Lane
                          > Houston, TX 77083
                          > C: (281) 202-9629
                          > H: (281) 530-7501
                          > F: (281) 530-7501
                          > kevin@...
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > _____
                          >
                          > From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hreg@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Susan
                          > Silvano
                          > Sent: Monday, September 14, 2009 7:46 PM
                          > To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
                          > Cc: Susan Silvano
                          > Subject: Re: [hreg] Re: HREG Solar Air Conditioning Tour Recap
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > Although my company is headquartered in Houston, we live in St. Thomas in
                          > the U.S. Virgin Islands. We have built our home there, and have installed
                          > five Mr. Slim's in our home, two in the apartment under our house and one
                          > in the pool cabana. The first was installed about three years ago. We have
                          > not had a minute's trouble with any of the units and they work great. We
                          > got federal and territory rebates on each of the units. The filters are
                          > easily removed and we wash them about once a quarter. I highly recommend
                          > going in this direction vs. a ducted system - much cheaper and more
                          > efficient as we very rarely turn on all the units.
                          >
                          >
                          > Now, all we have to do is figure out how to get them to work using solar.
                          >
                          >
                          > Regards,
                          >
                          > Susan
                          >
                          > Susan Silvano
                          > President
                          > Career Management International, Inc.
                          > 713-623-8780 Corporate Office
                          > 713-252-0924 Cell
                          >
                          > CMI. Supporting the business of people.
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > On Sep 14, 2009, at 4:30 PM, Kevin Conlin wrote:
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > Hi Jay, Good question, no one asked about the filter, but I'm guessing it
                          > does have a washable one inside the unit.
                          >
                          > I agree, between no duct work, selective cooling and high efficiency, I too
                          > believe they are the next wave. Problem is finding anyone willing to learn
                          > the technology. It took me 3 months to find a cooperative ac contractor as
                          > we just installed a 2 zone Mitsubishi Mr.. Slim on our community clubhouse.
                          > Every one tried to talk me into ductwork.
                          >
                          > Since solar panels are not specifically excluded in deed restrictions, it
                          > might be worth educating the architectural committee on your homeowners BOD.
                          > Traditionally the courts have ruled in favor of the homeowners when solar is
                          > challenged, but most people don't want that fight.
                          >
                          > Best Regards, Kevin
                          >
                          > Kevin Conlin
                          > Heliosolar Design, Inc.
                          > 13534 Quetzal Lane
                          > Houston, TX 77083
                          > C: (281) 202-9629
                          > H: (281) 530-7501
                          > F: (281) 530-7501
                          > kevin@heliosolardes <mailto:kevin@...> ign.com
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > _____
                          >
                          > From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hreg@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                          > jay.ring@...
                          > Sent: Monday, September 14, 2009 10:01 AM
                          > To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
                          > Subject: [hreg] Re: HREG Solar Air Conditioning Tour Recap
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > That was a great summery, very detailed. Thanks Kevin!
                          >
                          > I was planning on going, I was very disappointed to miss it.
                          >
                          > These split systems seem to be the way forward, at least for the energy/cost
                          > conscious crowd. The part about only cooling the part of the house that is
                          > occupied is huge!
                          >
                          > The part about the HOA is really disappointing, and continues to be
                          > disappointing. For the life of me I can not understand why people wouldn't
                          > want them in the neighborhood. This is something I think we can all work on.
                          >
                          > One question I have is about air filtration. Everyone knows how it gets
                          > filtered in a central air system. Is it just ignored in a split system, or
                          > part of the per-room unit? Is is an issue at all? I use washable filters to
                          > reduce waste, is something like that available?
                          >
                          > --- In hreg@yahoogroups. <mailto:hreg%40yahoogroups.com> com, "Kevin Conlin"
                          > <kevin@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > I thought I would summarize the tour for those who couldn't make it.
                          > >
                          > > Milton and his wife Pat were very gracious hosting about 40 people. The
                          > > indoor unit was very quiet and even featured emergency lights for power
                          > > outages that run off the battery bank. It uses a convenient wireless
                          > remote
                          > > rather than a conventional thermostat
                          > >
                          > > The outdoor unit was also extremely quiet, you could talk in a normal tone
                          > > of voice even while standing right next to it. It seemed very large for a
                          > > 1.5 ton condenser, so I'm guessing one way they make it so efficient is
                          > with
                          > > a larger than normal heat exchanger. The fan was whisper quiet. The system
                          > > does have provisions for 120VAC input, using the grid for backup gets you
                          > > the best of both worlds.
                          > >
                          > > Milton's approach is too leave the 120VAC unplugged, as his intention is
                          > to
                          > > use every bit of solar for cooling. He sees the system as a long term
                          > hedge
                          > > against rising utility costs, ignoring what might be calculated as
                          > payback.
                          > > He enjoys the satisfaction of offsetting his utility bill with his solar
                          > > system, and hopes to expand it in the future by adding another 1.5 ton
                          > unit.
                          > > It should be noted that the complete system does qualify for the 30%
                          > federal
                          > > tax credit, although in his case he had to "educate" the IRS a bit. (Good
                          > > thing he was a former teacher)
                          > >
                          > > The real beauty of the system is you only cool the portion of your house
                          > > that is occupied, especially effective at night. This strategy alone
                          > offers
                          > > utility savings.
                          > >
                          > > Four Sanyo 200W modules were mounted on a sturdy rack along the back
                          > fence,
                          > > as their home faces South and the HOA will not allow solar panels. Conduit
                          > > was run underground and was very clean, additional conduit for possible
                          > > future expansion was also installed, showing good forethought.
                          > >
                          > > The modules are very high efficiency, they feature an amorphous silicon
                          > > coating which raises their efficiency several points. They are preferred
                          > > where space is at a premium and maximum power density is needed.
                          > >
                          > > Milton is using an Outback MPPT controller, or Maximum Power Point
                          > Tracking,
                          > > which is a very good way to use higher voltage modules to charge a battery
                          > > bank. It is essentially a very efficient DC/DC converter which constantly
                          > > optimizes battery charging to get the most out of the solar array. Again,
                          > > there is also plenty of room for expansion, and the digital display gives
                          > > system status at a glance.
                          > >
                          > > Batteries are the old favorite, Trojan T-105's , 6V, 220Ah golf cart
                          > > batteries, which are the best battery you can get for the buck. They will
                          > > outlast gel batteries and cost half as much. They were safely installed in
                          > a
                          > > ventilated Rubbermaid storage bin with a temperature controlled fan.
                          > >
                          > > Overall the system was well done and safe.
                          > >
                          > > The thing that impressed me the most is because of the relatively low
                          > power
                          > > draw and DC operation, this is the first AC unit I have seen that is
                          > > suitable for use with a battery based backup system. In the event of a
                          > > hurricane or extended power outage, a portion of your home will have air
                          > > conditioning. It would also be perfect for a small off grid cabin or beach
                          > > house.
                          > >
                          > > The unit seemed to be well built and well thought out. With quiet
                          > > operation, no duct work and super high efficiency, it seems like a good
                          > > product whose time has come. This coming from a curmudgeon!
                          > >
                          > > The tour was followed by a friendly happy hour at Las Rosas Mexican
                          > > Restaurant, where topics from Permaculture to Driver Ed were discussed. A
                          > > good time was had by all.
                          > >
                          > > Thank you both Milton and Pat for opening your home and sharing your
                          > > knowledge with us!
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > Kevin Conlin
                          > > Heliosolar Design, Inc.
                          > > 13534 Quetzal Lane
                          > > Houston, TX 77083
                          > > C: (281) 202-9629
                          > > H: (281) 530-7501
                          > > F: (281) 530-7501
                          > > kevin@
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > No virus found in this incoming message.
                          > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                          > Version: 8.5.409 / Virus Database: 270.13.97/2370 - Release Date: 09/14/09
                          > 11:36:00
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > No virus found in this incoming message.
                          > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                          > Version: 8.5.409 / Virus Database: 270.13.97/2370 - Release Date: 09/14/09
                          > 11:36:00
                          >
                        • Kevin Conlin
                          Jay, I ve only seen AC units, and you re right, the extra conversion costs efficiency. I think the Sol Cool is probably your best bet for DC, but I understand
                          Message 12 of 14 , Sep 14, 2009
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Jay, I've only seen AC units, and you're right, the extra conversion costs efficiency. I think the Sol Cool is probably your best bet for DC, but I understand they are not yet in full production. I believe Milton said end of the year.
                             
                            As efficient as they are, I'm not sure you'd gain a whole lot with geosource, might be a longer payback than the extra solar power you'd need without it.
                             
                            The Sol Cool 18,000 BTU has a COP of 5.5, consumes 1000W average.
                             
                            Interesting question, anyone care to crunch the numbers? 
                             
                            Kevin Conlin
                            Heliosolar Design, Inc.
                            13534 Quetzal Lane
                            Houston, TX 77083
                            C:  (281) 202-9629
                            H:  (281) 530-7501
                            F:  (281) 530-7501
                             
                             
                             


                            From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hreg@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of jay.ring@...
                            Sent: Monday, September 14, 2009 10:28 PM
                            To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: [hreg] Re: HREG Solar Air Conditioning Tour Recap

                             

                            I know Sanyo and LG make models too, but I can't tell if they are different or just rebrands. I would love some sort of break down.

                            Next up someone needs to design one of these crossed with a ground source heat pump :)

                            Is the Mr Slim DC powered, or AC only? I am not against AC powered, there is a lot of convenience there for code compliance, but for solar, the whole DC to AC to DC and then back to AC seems a little much...

                            There is another good push we could all work on - update the N.E.C. to be DC friendlier!

                            --- In hreg@yahoogroups. com, "Kevin Conlin" <kevin@...> wrote:

                            >
                            > My contractor just finished
                            installing a two zone heat pump Mr. Slim in our
                            > community clubhouse, and
                            the only way you can tell if they're on is by the
                            > LED's. The indoor
                            units are 3 speed, which is a nice feature, but even on
                            > high, the
                            ceiling fans make more noise. Even the outdoor unit is barely
                            >
                            audible.
                            >
                            > Kevin Conlin
                            > Heliosolar Design, Inc.
                            >
                            13534 Quetzal Lane
                            > Houston, TX 77083
                            > C: (281) 202-9629
                            >
                            H: (281) 530-7501
                            > F: (281) 530-7501
                            > kevin@...
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > _____
                            >
                            > From:
                            href="mailto:hreg%40yahoogroups.com">hreg@yahoogroups. com [mailto:hreg@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Susan
                            > Silvano
                            > Sent: Monday, September 14, 2009 7:46 PM
                            >
                            To: hreg@yahoogroups. com
                            > Cc:
                            Susan Silvano
                            > Subject: Re: [hreg] Re: HREG Solar Air Conditioning Tour
                            Recap
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > Although my company is
                            headquartered in Houston, we live in St. Thomas in
                            > the U.S. Virgin
                            Islands. We have built our home there, and have installed
                            > five Mr.
                            Slim's in our home, two in the apartment under our house and one
                            > in the
                            pool cabana. The first was installed about three years ago. We have
                            > not
                            had a minute's trouble with any of the units and they work great. We
                            > got
                            federal and territory rebates on each of the units. The filters are
                            >
                            easily removed and we wash them about once a quarter. I highly recommend
                            >
                            going in this direction vs. a ducted system - much cheaper and more
                            >
                            efficient as we very rarely turn on all the units.
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            Now, all we have to do is figure out how to get them to work using solar.
                            >
                            >
                            > Regards,
                            >
                            > Susan
                            >
                            > Susan Silvano
                            > President
                            > Career Management
                            International, Inc.
                            > 713-623-8780 Corporate Office
                            > 713-252-0924
                            Cell
                            >
                            > CMI. Supporting the business of people.
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > On Sep 14, 2009, at 4:30 PM, Kevin Conlin
                            wrote:
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > Hi Jay, Good question, no one
                            asked about the filter, but I'm guessing it
                            > does have a washable one
                            inside the unit.
                            >
                            > I agree, between no duct work, selective
                            cooling and high efficiency, I too
                            > believe they are the next wave.
                            Problem is finding anyone willing to learn
                            > the technology. It took me 3
                            months to find a cooperative ac contractor as
                            > we just installed a 2 zone
                            Mitsubishi Mr.. Slim on our community clubhouse.
                            > Every one tried to talk
                            me into ductwork.
                            >
                            > Since solar panels are not specifically
                            excluded in deed restrictions, it
                            > might be worth educating the
                            architectural committee on your homeowners BOD.
                            > Traditionally the courts
                            have ruled in favor of the homeowners when solar is
                            > challenged, but most
                            people don't want that fight.
                            >
                            > Best Regards, Kevin
                            >
                            > Kevin Conlin
                            > Heliosolar Design, Inc.
                            > 13534 Quetzal
                            Lane
                            > Houston, TX 77083
                            > C: (281) 202-9629
                            > H: (281)
                            530-7501
                            > F: (281) 530-7501
                            > kevin@heliosolardes
                            <mailto:kevin@ ...> ign.com
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > _____
                            >
                            > From:
                            href="mailto:hreg%40yahoogroups.com">hreg@yahoogroups. com [mailto:hreg@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of
                            > jay.ring@...
                            > Sent: Monday, September 14, 2009 10:01
                            AM
                            > To:
                            href="mailto:hreg%40yahoogroups.com">hreg@yahoogroups. com
                            >
                            Subject: [hreg] Re: HREG Solar Air Conditioning Tour Recap
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > That was a great summery, very detailed. Thanks
                            Kevin!
                            >
                            > I was planning on going, I was very disappointed to miss
                            it.
                            >
                            > These split systems seem to be the way forward, at least
                            for the energy/cost
                            > conscious crowd. The part about only cooling the
                            part of the house that is
                            > occupied is huge!
                            >
                            > The part
                            about the HOA is really disappointing, and continues to be
                            >
                            disappointing. For the life of me I can not understand why people wouldn't
                            > want them in the neighborhood. This is something I think we can
                            all work on.
                            >
                            > One question I have is about air filtration.
                            Everyone knows how it gets
                            > filtered in a central air system. Is it just
                            ignored in a split system, or
                            > part of the per-room unit? Is is an issue
                            at all? I use washable filters to
                            > reduce waste, is something like that
                            available?
                            >
                            > --- In hreg@yahoogroups.
                            <mailto:hreg% 40yahoogroups. com> com, "Kevin Conlin"
                            >
                            <kevin@> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > I thought I would summarize the
                            tour for those who couldn't make it.
                            > >
                            > > Milton and his
                            wife Pat were very gracious hosting about 40 people. The
                            > > indoor
                            unit was very quiet and even featured emergency lights for power
                            > >
                            outages that run off the battery bank. It uses a convenient wireless
                            >
                            remote
                            > > rather than a conventional thermostat
                            > >
                            > > The outdoor unit was also extremely quiet, you could talk in a normal
                            tone
                            > > of voice even while standing right next to it. It seemed very
                            large for a
                            > > 1.5 ton condenser, so I'm guessing one way they make it
                            so efficient is
                            > with
                            > > a larger than normal heat exchanger.
                            The fan was whisper quiet. The system
                            > > does have provisions for
                            120VAC input, using the grid for backup gets you
                            > > the best of both
                            worlds.
                            > >
                            > > Milton's approach is too leave the 120VAC
                            unplugged, as his intention is
                            > to
                            > > use every bit of solar
                            for cooling. He sees the system as a long term
                            > hedge
                            > >
                            against rising utility costs, ignoring what might be calculated as
                            >
                            payback.
                            > > He enjoys the satisfaction of offsetting his utility bill
                            with his solar
                            > > system, and hopes to expand it in the future by
                            adding another 1.5 ton
                            > unit.
                            > > It should be noted that the
                            complete system does qualify for the 30%
                            > federal
                            > > tax
                            credit, although in his case he had to "educate" the IRS a bit. (Good
                            > > thing he was a former teacher)
                            > >
                            > > The real beauty
                            of the system is you only cool the portion of your house
                            > > that is
                            occupied, especially effective at night. This strategy alone
                            >
                            offers
                            > > utility savings.
                            > >
                            > > Four Sanyo 200W
                            modules were mounted on a sturdy rack along the back
                            > fence,
                            > >
                            as their home faces South and the HOA will not allow solar panels. Conduit
                            > > was run underground and was very clean, additional conduit
                            for possible
                            > > future expansion was also installed, showing good
                            forethought.
                            > >
                            > > The modules are very high efficiency,
                            they feature an amorphous silicon
                            > > coating which raises their
                            efficiency several points. They are preferred
                            > > where space is at a
                            premium and maximum power density is needed.
                            > >
                            > > Milton
                            is using an Outback MPPT controller, or Maximum Power Point
                            >
                            Tracking,
                            > > which is a very good way to use higher voltage modules to
                            charge a battery
                            > > bank. It is essentially a very efficient DC/DC
                            converter which constantly
                            > > optimizes battery charging to get the
                            most out of the solar array. Again,
                            > > there is also plenty of room
                            for expansion, and the digital display gives
                            > > system status at a
                            glance.
                            > >
                            > > Batteries are the old favorite, Trojan
                            T-105's , 6V, 220Ah golf cart
                            > > batteries, which are the best battery
                            you can get for the buck. They will
                            > > outlast gel batteries and cost
                            half as much. They were safely installed in
                            > a
                            > > ventilated
                            Rubbermaid storage bin with a temperature controlled fan.
                            > >
                            > > Overall the system was well done and safe.
                            > >
                            > > The
                            thing that impressed me the most is because of the relatively low
                            >
                            power
                            > > draw and DC operation, this is the first AC unit I have seen
                            that is
                            > > suitable for use with a battery based backup system. In the
                            event of a
                            > > hurricane or extended power outage, a portion of your
                            home will have air
                            > > conditioning. It would also be perfect for a
                            small off grid cabin or beach
                            > > house.
                            > >
                            > > The
                            unit seemed to be well built and well thought out. With quiet
                            > >
                            operation, no duct work and super high efficiency, it seems like a good
                            > > product whose time has come. This coming from a curmudgeon!
                            > >
                            > > The tour was followed by a friendly happy hour at Las Rosas
                            Mexican
                            > > Restaurant, where topics from Permaculture to Driver Ed
                            were discussed. A
                            > > good time was had by all.
                            > >
                            > > Thank you both Milton and Pat for opening your home and sharing
                            your
                            > > knowledge with us!
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            Kevin Conlin
                            > > Heliosolar Design, Inc.
                            > > 13534 Quetzal
                            Lane
                            > > Houston, TX 77083
                            > > C: (281) 202-9629
                            > >
                            H: (281) 530-7501
                            > > F: (281) 530-7501
                            > > kevin@
                            >
                            >
                            >
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