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evaporative cooling...

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  • evelyn sardina
    Does anyone know how much chemicals are used in making 1 gallon of potable water and how much electric energy is used to make that 1 gallon of water
    Message 1 of 7 , May 14, 2009
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      Does anyone know how much chemicals are used in making 1 gallon of potable water and how much electric energy is used to make that 1 gallon of water residential safe? I am thinking about cooling with air conditioning and cooling with evaporative cooling. I have information from the company that sells the evaporative cooling and an aproximate amount of what I would use in my home but don't want to get it, if it ends up being that you are going to spend the same energy ( by using water that has been processed with energy and then cleaned up with chemicals) in the end, since the whole idea is to be sustainable..
       
      The system is very affordable so for a house about 2,000 square feet you will pay 700 hundred dollars plus the cost of installation which is about a 2 day plumber job and the cost of the water used to run the system. I figured out with average rain fall in houston I would not be able to collect all the water I would need to run the system and even if I collected some of it I would still need to run a pump to get the water to the roof.
      So you see my main concern is the water usage which is as much of what I spend in a month, which would double my bill and waste potable water....

    • Richard Yoo
      My understanding is that evaporative cooling for residential really isn t that effective in Houston due to the high humidity -Richard
      Message 2 of 7 , May 14, 2009
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        My understanding is that evaporative cooling for residential really isn't that effective in Houston due to the high humidity

        -Richard

        --- In hreg@yahoogroups.com, evelyn sardina <evelynsardina@...> wrote:
        >
        > Does anyone know how much chemicals are used in making 1 gallon of potable water and how much electric energy is used to make that 1 gallon of water residential safe? I am thinking about cooling with air conditioning and cooling with evaporative cooling. I have information from the company that sells the evaporative cooling and an aproximate amount of what I would use in my home but don't want to get it, if it ends up being that you are going to spend the same energy ( by using water that has been processed with energy and then cleaned up with chemicals) in the end, since the whole idea is to be sustainable..
        > �
        > The system is very affordable so for a house about 2,000 square feet you will pay 700 hundred dollars plus the cost of installation which is about a 2 day plumber job and the cost of the water used to run the system. I figured out with average rain fall in houston I would not be able to collect all the water I would need to run the system and even if I collected some of it I would still need to run a pump to get the water to the roof.
        > So you see my main concern is the water usage which is as much of what I spend in a month, which would double my bill and waste potable water....
        >
      • Alyssa Burgin
        Evaporative cooling does not work in Houston, period. Although I work in issue advocacy, I m a general contractor specializing in historical preservation, and
        Message 3 of 7 , May 14, 2009
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          Evaporative cooling does not work in Houston, period. Although I work in issue advocacy, I'm a general contractor specializing in historical preservation, and I've done lots of new construction in the Houston area as well as adaptive reuse in the Houston Heights. Evaporative cooling is a great method for desert, or near-desert areas. El Paso is one of the largest evaporative-cooling markets in the region, and their humidity levels are some of the lowest in the state. San Antonio, on the other hand, with average humidity of only 37%, is NOT a market for evaporative cooling. Clearly, that sets the bar very low, because as we all know, Houston certainly has a higher humidity than San Antonio.

          Alyssa Burgin

          On Thu, May 14, 2009 at 11:07 AM, Richard Yoo <richardyoo@...> wrote:
          My understanding is that evaporative cooling for residential really isn't that effective in Houston due to the high humidity

          -Richard

          --- In hreg@yahoogroups.com, evelyn sardina <evelynsardina@...> wrote:
          >
          > Does anyone know how much chemicals are used in making 1 gallon of potable water and how much electric energy is used to make that 1 gallon of water residential safe? I am thinking about cooling with air conditioning and cooling with evaporative cooling. I have information from the company that sells the evaporative cooling and an aproximate amount of what I would use in my home but don't want to get it, if it ends up being that you are going to spend the same energy ( by using water that has been processed with energy and then cleaned up with chemicals) in the end, since the whole idea is to be sustainable..
          > �
          > The system is very affordable so for a house about 2,000 square feet you will pay 700 hundred dollars plus the cost of installation which is about a 2 day plumber job and the cost of the water used to run the system. I figured out with average rain fall in houston I would not be able to collect all the water I would need to run the system and even if I collected some of it I would still need to run a pump to get the water to the roof.
          > So you see my main concern is the water usage which is as much of what I spend in a month, which would double my bill and waste potable water....
          >




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        • evelyn sardina
          The architect that did the presentation uses this method in his own home in combination with other energy sources so I figure it should work to a point I just
          Message 4 of 7 , May 14, 2009
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            The architect that did the presentation uses this method in his own home in combination with other energy sources so I figure it should work to a point I just don't know what that point is... Thank you for your responses.


            --- On Thu, 5/14/09, Alyssa Burgin <aburgin4peace@...> wrote:

            From: Alyssa Burgin <aburgin4peace@...>
            Subject: Re: [hreg] Re: evaporative cooling...
            To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Thursday, May 14, 2009, 11:15 AM

            Evaporative cooling does not work in Houston, period. Although I work in issue advocacy, I'm a general contractor specializing in historical preservation, and I've done lots of new construction in the Houston area as well as adaptive reuse in the Houston Heights. Evaporative cooling is a great method for desert, or near-desert areas. El Paso is one of the largest evaporative- cooling markets in the region, and their humidity levels are some of the lowest in the state. San Antonio, on the other hand, with average humidity of only 37%, is NOT a market for evaporative cooling. Clearly, that sets the bar very low, because as we all know, Houston certainly has a higher humidity than San Antonio.

            Alyssa Burgin

            On Thu, May 14, 2009 at 11:07 AM, Richard Yoo <richardyoo@gmail. com> wrote:
            My understanding is that evaporative cooling for residential really isn't that effective in Houston due to the high humidity

            -Richard

            --- In hreg@yahoogroups. com, evelyn sardina <evelynsardina@ ...> wrote:
            >
            > Does anyone know how much chemicals are used in making 1 gallon of potable water and how much electric energy is used to make that 1 gallon of water residential safe? I am thinking about cooling with air conditioning and cooling with evaporative cooling. I have information from the company that sells the evaporative cooling and an aproximate amount of what I would use in my home but don't want to get it, if it ends up being that you are going to spend the same energy ( by using water that has been processed with energy and then cleaned up with chemicals) in the end, since the whole idea is to be sustainable. .
            > �
            > The system is very affordable so for a house about 2,000 square feet you will pay 700 hundred dollars plus the cost of installation which is about a 2 day plumber job and the cost of the water used to run the system. I figured out with average rain fall in houston I would not be able to collect all the water I would need to run the system and even if I collected some of it I would still need to run a pump to get the water to the roof.
            > So you see my main concern is the water usage which is as much of what I spend in a month, which would double my bill and waste potable water....
            >




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          • Polly Ledvina
            As you say, evaporative cooling does not work as well here as it does in places with less humidity; however, evapotranspiration via green roofs does work well
            Message 5 of 7 , May 14, 2009
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              As you say, evaporative cooling does not work as well here as it does in places with less humidity; however, evapotranspiration via green roofs does work well here to reduce cooling costs – especially if the green roofs are watered with harvested rainwater. In this case, you would be carrying heat away both through evapotranspiration by the plants and by transferring it to the runoff created when watering the plants.

               

              Polly

               

              Polly Ledvina,  PhD, LEED AP Homes

              PSL Integrated Solutions

              2375 Bolsover

              Houston, TX 77005

              Office: 713-524-8352

              Mobile: 713-825-7136

              Email: polly.ledvina@...

               

               


              From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto: hreg@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Richard Yoo
              Sent: Thursday, May 14, 2009 11:08 AM
              To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [hreg] Re: evaporative cooling...

               




              My understanding is that evaporative cooling for residential really isn't that effective in Houston due to the high humidity

              -Richard

              --- In hreg@yahoogroups. com, evelyn sardina <evelynsardina@ ...> wrote:

              >
              > Does anyone know how much chemicals are used in making 1 gallon of potable
              water and how much electric energy is used to make that 1 gallon of water residential safe? I am thinking about cooling with air conditioning and cooling with evaporative cooling. I have information from the company that sells the evaporative cooling and an aproximate amount of what I would use in my home but don't want to get it, if it ends up being that you are going to spend the same energy ( by using water that has been processed with energy and then cleaned up with chemicals) in the end, since the whole idea is to be sustainable. .
              > �
              > The system is very affordable so for a house about 2,000 square feet you
              will pay 700 hundred dollars plus the cost of installation which is about a 2 day plumber job and the cost of the water used to run the system. I figured out with average rain fall in houston I would not be able to collect all the water I would need to run the system and even if I collected some of it I would still need to run a pump to get the water to the roof.
              > So you see my main concern is the water usage which is as much of what I
              spend in a month, which would double my bill and waste potable water....
              >

            • Ed Sarlls
              Not sure how well that I remember how to use a psychrometric chart but it looks like: Temperatures are in deg. F a.. 90 deg. air temp. and 90 % relative
              Message 6 of 7 , May 14, 2009
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                Not sure how well that I remember how to use a psychrometric chart but it looks like:
                Temperatures are in deg. F
                • 90 deg. air temp. and 90 % relative humidity (RH) will cool the air to about 87 deg. (Houston)
                • 90 deg air and 70 % RH will cool the air to about 81 deg.
                • 90 deg. air and 40 % RH will cool the air to about 71 deg.
                • 90 deg. air and 20 % RH will cool the air to about 64 deg. (El Paso)
                One other thing - to get these temperatures the outlet air will be close to 100 % RH
                This doesn't mean that it will cool your house to these temperatures that is just the air temperature out of the evaporative cooler.
                It may work to cool an attic where the air will be much higher temp. than outside air. If they are doing this in combination with other cooling there may be some advantages.
                 
                Where is the architect's home?
                 
                Ed Sarlls
                 
                 
                 
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Thursday, May 14, 2009 1:49 PM
                Subject: Re: [hreg] Re: evaporative cooling...

                The architect that did the presentation uses this method in his own home in combination with other energy sources so I figure it should work to a point I just don't know what that point is... Thank you for your responses.


                --- On Thu, 5/14/09, Alyssa Burgin <aburgin4peace@ gmail.com> wrote:

                From: Alyssa Burgin <aburgin4peace@ gmail.com>
                Subject: Re: [hreg] Re: evaporative cooling...
                To: hreg@yahoogroups. com
                Date: Thursday, May 14, 2009, 11:15 AM

                Evaporative cooling does not work in Houston, period. Although I work in issue advocacy, I'm a general contractor specializing in historical preservation, and I've done lots of new construction in the Houston area as well as adaptive reuse in the Houston Heights. Evaporative cooling is a great method for desert, or near-desert areas. El Paso is one of the largest evaporative- cooling markets in the region, and their humidity levels are some of the lowest in the state. San Antonio, on the other hand, with average humidity of only 37%, is NOT a market for evaporative cooling. Clearly, that sets the bar very low, because as we all know, Houston certainly has a higher humidity than San Antonio.

                Alyssa Burgin

                On Thu, May 14, 2009 at 11:07 AM, Richard Yoo <richardyoo@gmail. com> wrote:
                My understanding is that evaporative cooling for residential really isn't that effective in Houston due to the high humidity

                -Richard

                --- In hreg@yahoogroups. com, evelyn sardina <evelynsardina@ ...> wrote:
                >
                > Does anyone know how much chemicals are used in making 1 gallon of potable water and how much electric energy is used to make that 1 gallon of water residential safe? I am thinking about cooling with air conditioning and cooling with evaporative cooling. I have information from the company that sells the evaporative cooling and an aproximate amount of what I would use in my home but don't want to get it, if it ends up being that you are going to spend the same energy ( by using water that has been processed with energy and then cleaned up with chemicals) in the end, since the whole idea is to be sustainable. .
                > �
                > The system is very affordable so for a house about 2,000 square feet you will pay 700 hundred dollars plus the cost of installation which is about a 2 day plumber job and the cost of the water used to run the system. I figured out with average rain fall in houston I would not be able to collect all the water I would need to run the system and even if I collected some of it I would still need to run a pump to get the water to the roof.
                > So you see my main concern is the water usage which is as much of what I spend in a month, which would double my bill and waste potable water....
                >




                ------------ --------- --------- ------

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              • Garth & Kim Travis
                Greetings, If you are using the humidity in the air, like they do in Arizona and New Mexico, no it is not much use here. However, some of us use it on our
                Message 7 of 7 , May 15, 2009
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                  Greetings,
                  If you are using the humidity in the air, like they do in Arizona and
                  New Mexico, no it is not much use here. However, some of us use it on
                  our roofs to keep them cool, then it is a real asset. Many restaurants
                  use the misters on their outdoor patios, which do help to keep the areas
                  cooler.
                  Bright Blessings,
                  Kim

                  Richard Yoo wrote:
                  > My understanding is that evaporative cooling for residential really isn't that effective in Houston due to the high humidity
                  >
                  > -Richard
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
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