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Re: [hreg] Homeowners Assocs, Houston Pollution, & Attitudes toward Alternative Energy

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  • Bill or Dorothy Swann
    If the bill passes, does anyone know whether there will be a run on applications to the extent that it will be impossible to get the rebate? Here is a link to
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 25, 2009
      If the bill passes, does anyone know whether there will be a run on applications to the extent that it will be impossible to get the rebate? Here is a link to the bill <http://www.legis.state.tx.us/BillLookup/History.aspx?LegSess=81R&Bill=SB545>
       
      Thanks,Bill S
      Ph 832-338-3080
      www.hstech.biz
      www.promotingevs.com



      From: "phil6142@..." <phil6142@...>
      To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thursday, April 23, 2009 10:52:12 PM
      Subject: Re: [hreg] Homeowners Assocs, Houston Pollution, & Attitudes toward Alternative Energy

      The issues with Homeowners Associations may be resolved by State Law:

      0D
      U.S. News: Texas Moves to Foster Solar Power --- State Senate Passes Bill Offering $500 Million to Subsidize Small-Scale Users
      By Russell Gold
      23 April, 2009
      The Wall Street Journal
      556 Words
      (Copyright (c) 2009, Dow Jones & Company, Inc.)
               AUSTIN, Texas -- The Texas state legislature is expected to soon approve one of the largest subsidy programs for solar-power in the U.S.
               Long a leader in oil and natural gas-based energy, Texas embraced wind power years ago and generates more electricity from wind than any other state. Building on that, the state senate on Tuesday overwhelmingly approved $500 million over five years for a rebate program to encourage solar-power installations, while a senate committee advanced a bill that would mandate a roughly 60% increase in electricity derived from renewable sources other than wind.
               At least 30% of the $500 million -- which is to come from electric-bill fees -- would be dedicated to small-scale installations. The legislation also bars homeowners associations from prohibiting residential solar panels. The bill awaits a vote by the Texas House of Representatives.
               Jim Marston, head of the Texas chapter of Environmental Defense, said he expects the rebates would bring Texas about 250 to 500 megawatts of solar-power generation, which now costs more than other electricity sources but is being buoyed by government support and falling manufacturing costs. That is roughly equivalent to the output from a natural-gas power plant.
               There are currently 590 megawatts of solar generating capacity in the U.S., according to the federal Energy Information Administration, and that is expected to grow to 900 megawatts by 2014.
               Raymond Walker, general counsel of Standard Renewable Energy, a Houston company that installs solar panels for homes and businesses, said he was encouraged. The bill, he said, "signals to the industry that Texas is a good place to do business for the renewable-energy industry."
               One potential drawback is the price at which homeowners would be able sell their excess solar power to utilities -- an important20factor in calculating how long it takes to recover the cost of installing solar panels. The bill requires that utilities purchase surpluses at a "fair market price," which can be 20% less than the going rate for retail electricity.
               Other states require utilities to match the going rate when buying excess solar power, said Rusty Haynes, a program manager at the North Carolina Solar Center, a government-funded information clearinghouse. That discrepancy will slow the adaptation by Texans, he said.
               The bill approved by the senate panel, meanwhile, would require that Texas get 3,000 megawatts -- about 3.8% -- of its electricity from renewable sources other than wind. Texas already mandates that more than 5,000 megawatts come from wind. Solar advocates say this will help jumpstart a solar-manufacturing industry in Texas.
               "These new bills would bring [Texas] into the forefront of states that have solar incentives and possibly help make them a leading producer of solar electricity, " said Glen Andersen, who tracks renewable energy for the National Conference of State Legislatures.
               Other states are being even more aggressive on this front. A new Arizona law requires that 4.5% of its electricity come from solar power by 2025, and New Mexico is aiming for 4% by 2020. California is considering a requirement that the state get 33% of its electricity from renewable sources by 2020.
               License this article from Dow Jones Reprint Service



      -----Original Message-----
      From: evelyn sardina <evelynsardina@ yahoo.com>
      To: hreg@yahoogroups. com
      Sent: Tue, 21 Apr 2009 6:52 pm
      Subject: Re: Fwd: [hreg] Homeowners Assocs, Houston Pollution, & Attitudes toward Alternative Energy



      Thank you for all of your suggestions. ...

      --- On Tue, 4/21/09, Nancy Edwards <needwards@comcast. net> wrote:
      From: Nancy Edwards <needwards@comcast. net>
      Subject: Fwd: [hreg] Homeowners Assocs, Houston Pollution, & Attitudes toward Alternative Energy
      To:=2 0hreg@yahoogroups. com
      Date: Tuesday, April 21, 2009, 11:32 AM

      Evelyn wrote: “… I would like to start a green group in my subdivision. I have been adviced that I will encounter resistance. Any words of wisdom of how I should start the group and what are the things I should try to get people interested in first?”

      Well, Ariel, we certainly sent Evelyn the opposite advice, didn't we.
      Nancy Edwards

      Begin forwarded message:


      Dear Evelyn,
      I can well imagine that people are currently worried about the value of their houses now and might be even more inclined than usual to react negatively to diverse opinions.  So.. 
      I suggest, don't announce what you are doing at all.  Just call your friends and get started.  That is what I did.  When you have some good statistics to show that you are saving money - then let the rest of the subdivision in on it.
      Nancy

      On Apr 20, 2009, at 10:11 PM, Nancy Benthien wrote:

      Hi Evelyn,
       
      I think if you position this green group as a home-owner energy efficiency group, you won’t have nearly as much trouble with the HOA.  For the G.R.E.E.N. workshops, we’ve found that people get interested with a couple of major messages:
                1.  Save money by being more energy efficient
                2.  Do things to help protect the environment
      0A
       
      Nancy Edwards started a Green Group in her neighborhood and it’s been going on for well over a year now.  I’ve cc’d her.  I’ll bet she has lots of ideas how to get this one going. 
       
      GOOD LUCK and keep us informed how its going!
       
      Nancy Benthien
       
      From: hreg@yahoogroups. com [mailto:hreg@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of evelyn sardina
      Sent: Sunday, April 19, 2009 7:00 PM
      To: hreg@yahoogroups. com
      Subject: Re: [hreg] Homeowners Assocs, Houston Pollution, & Attitudes toward Alternative Energy
       



      TD vAlign=top>
      Hi. My name is Evelyn Sardina and I would like to start a green group in my subdivision. I have been adviced that I will encounter resistance. Any words of wisdom of how I should start the group and what are the things I should try to get people interested in first?

      --- On Sun, 4/19/09, Andrea Wisner <amwisner@yahoo. com> wrote:
      From: Andrea Wisner <amwisner@yahoo. com>
      Subject: [hreg] Homeowners Assocs, Houston Pollution, & Attitudes toward Alternative Energy
      To: hreg@yahoogroups. com
      Date: Sunday, April 19, 2009, 5:33 PM
      I am wondering how hard it is to convince an HOA in Houston to allow solar collectors on rooftops. Tthe Environ mental Integrity Project,http://www.environm entalintegrity. org/, just released a report on April 6, 2009 (link not working now), showing Texas is the highest CO2 producer in the US. I would think we should all be looking upon it as a civic duty to reduce our "carbon footprint." I do realize it is not necessarily individual homes that directly cause the release of all this pollution, but we do benefit from the industry in Texas in the respect that it helps to fund our jobs, and every little bit helps in reducing pollution.
       
      Interestingly, the New York Times (online) has an extensive article today called "The Green Issue: Why Isn’t the Brain Green?," which is a sociological study of decision-making in regard to alternative energy and conservation issues. The information in this article itself (even without the complete study results) is enough to give an idea as to how we might approach convincing people. I'm afraid I may have to apply it sometime soon.
       
      Has anyone dealt with the HOA issue?
       
      AMW
       



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