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Re:Dear Centerpoint Energy-

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  • Bill Tarbox
    Hi Jay, No, unfortunately, I have not yet heard when they are proposing the hike in the solar tax credits for home owners. I heard this in an interview on KPFT
    Message 1 of 26 , Sep 30, 2008
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      Hi Jay,
       
      No, unfortunately, I have not yet heard when they are proposing the hike in the solar tax credits for home owners. I heard this in an interview on KPFT 90.1 FM Houston. I've surfed around their web site for more info but there's nothing relating to details on the solar tax credit.
       
      Like you, I would jump at installing solar panels in a minute if I could get a reasonable tax credit and even a $4,000 is pretty alluring. As it is now, like many folks I know, I keep waiting for the prices to drop to get better deals but time is not on our side so I will probably "bite the bullet" in a year or two and get the panels. (Get a nice discount on the panels and system, no electric bill, possibly even sell excess power back to the grid? SWEET!!!)
       
      Regards!
       
      Bill Tarbox
      Magnolia, TX
    • Henry H Haynes
      Hey Bill, et al: Along those same lines,  I often think what a difference it would have made if we would have taken the hundreds of billions of dollars being
      Message 2 of 26 , Sep 30, 2008
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        Hey Bill, et al:

        Along those same lines,  I often think what a difference it would have made if we would have taken the hundreds of billions of dollars being dumped into Iraq & put this capital into solar & wind along with the necessary infrastructure to deliver it.  With that kind of investment, would we even be concerned about oil imports after about ten or twenty years?  (Sorry, I usually try to stay somewhat non-political, but it's hard in this case.)

        I think it would be very interesting to see some "what if" calculations.  i.e. What if we were to take a trillion dollars (sadly a fairly conservative figure) & put it into wind farms & grid connections?  How many millions of bbls. of oil per year could be replaced?  I'm sure some of you out there have access to construction costs,  expected power outputs from wind generators, etc., from which calculations could be run.  I tried to find these data w/out much luck.

        HHH

        --- On Mon, 9/29/08, Bill Tarbox <btarbox@...> wrote:
        From: Bill Tarbox <btarbox@...>
        Subject: [hreg] Re:Dear Centerpoint Energy-
        To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Monday, September 29, 2008, 3:41 PM

        Just to add to your argument for converting to solar, if we did so it would reduce the need for coal-fired power plants and other fossil fuel generated power sources. This alone, would help solve a number of major problems facing us. It's now a well-established fact that green-house gases (created from energy generation) has a direct link to both global climate change and the recent development of more severe hurricanes (6 of the 10 worst hurricanes on record have occurred in the last 10 years, 3 in 2005 alone). My point is, that converting to solar would also help reduce the potential for even more devastating hurricanes. (Even our "president" - who doesn't believe in evolution -  has admitted he believes Global Warming is real.)
         
        I heard that one of the bargaining chips the opponents require to this agreement Congress made to open the Atlantic coast to offshore oil drilling was to include a doubling of the tax credit to homeowners installing solar panels from $2,000 to $4,000. An industry expert said it's a start but if they were serious they would have made it $10,000 to $15,000. Then, who WOULDN'T go solar!? That is my biggest beef with the energy crisis and the ridiculous plans they come up with (MORE subsidies to the oil industry). And the big argument is that we can't afford to make the changes overnight to renewable energy, it will take years to develop technology. HELL YES we can! The technology is already here and available. It the government was serious about solving the problem it could be done "overnight"! (By the way, thank you, Mr. Reagan, for gutting all the renewable energy programs President Carter initiated while he was in office! Thanks for steering us BACK on course down this road to dependence on foreign fossil fuel!)
         
        Bill Tarbox
        Magnolia, TX
      • Gary Beck
        This is not necessarily a renewable energy issue, with the exception of if you had a solar panel rip off part of your roof, or if you had a tree remove a
        Message 3 of 26 , Sep 30, 2008
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          This is not necessarily a renewable energy issue, with the exception of if you had a solar panel rip off part of your roof,  or if you had a tree remove a dormer (just inspected one) that is letting out your air conditioning.  

           

          We have always provides engineering design and inspection services for new builds, and renovations. Recently we have been active with storm related damage.  We provide a comprehensive engineer stamped report at the same price as before the storm.

           

          If any HREG members or their neighbors have storm damage requiring an engineer’s report, please contact us for a quote.

           

          Gary Beck, P.E., SECB, LEED AP

          Eco-Holdings LLC - Engineering Services

          4010 Blue Bonnet Blvd., Ste 114, Houston, TX 77025

          Tel: 713-377-4209, Fax: 832-201-5338 Cell: 713-530-1950

           

           

          Gary Beck is SECB certified in the Practice of Structural Engineering, a structural inspector for the Texas Residential Construction Commission SIRP program, and a listed Engineer for the Texas Department of Insurance Wind Storm program. Eco provides Engineering and Engineer's Inspection Services for Residential, Commercial, Lodging, Educational, Industrial and Government Facilities. Eco's design engineering services include AutoCAD based construction documents for permitting and building foundations, structures, storm water systems, and detention ponds; and Autodesk Revit based 3D Building Information Modeling for green building practices.

           

        • Kevin Conlin
          Unfortunately, energy and politics are tightly intertwined, but you are exactly right. That type of investment into renewables would address the issues of
          Message 4 of 26 , Sep 30, 2008
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            Unfortunately, energy and politics are tightly intertwined, but you are exactly right.  That type of investment into renewables would address the issues of foreign oil dependence, global warming, the trade deficit and would likely reduce the chances that we will be drawn into another war over resources.

             

            The problem is that would make too much sense and actually benefit the American people.  Congress doesn’t think like that anymore.  Don’t get me started……..!

             

            Kevin Conlin

            Solarcraft, Inc.

            4007-C Greenbriar Drive

            Stafford, TX 77477

            Local (281) 340-1224

            Toll Free (877) 340-1224

            Fax (281) 340-1230

            Cell (281) 960-8979

            kconlin@...

            www.solarcraft.net

             


            From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto: hreg@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Henry H Haynes
            Sent: Tuesday, September 30, 2008 9:51 AM
            To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [hreg] Re:Dear Centerpoint Energy-

             

            Hey Bill, et al:

            Along those same lines,  I often think what a difference it would have made if we would have taken the hundreds of billions of dollars being dumped into Iraq & put this capital into solar & wind along with the necessary infrastructure to deliver it.  With that kind of investment, would we even be concerned about oil imports after about ten or twenty years?  (Sorry, I usually try to stay somewhat non-political, but it's hard in this case.)

            I think it would be very interesting to see some "what if" calculations.  i.e. What if we were to take a trillion dollars (sadly a fairly conservative figure) & put it into wind farms & grid connections?  How many millions of bbls. of oil per year could be replaced?  I'm sure some of you out there have access to construction costs,  expected power outputs from wind generators, etc., from which calculations could be run.  I tried to find these data w/out much luck.

            HHH

            --- On Mon, 9/29/08, Bill Tarbox <btarbox@encorebank. com> wrote:

            From: Bill Tarbox <btarbox@encorebank. com>
            Subject: [hreg] Re:Dear Centerpoint Energy-
            To: hreg@yahoogroups. com
            Date: Monday, September 29, 2008, 3:41 PM

            Just to add to your argument for converting to solar, if we did so it would reduce the need for coal-fired power plants and other fossil fuel generated power sources. This alone, would help solve a number of major problems facing us. It's now a well-established fact that green-house gases (created from energy generation) has a direct link to both global climate change and the recent development of more severe hurricanes (6 of the 10 worst hurricanes on record have occurred in the last 10 years, 3 in 2005 alone). My point is, that converting to solar would also help reduce the potential for even more devastating hurricanes. (Even our "president" - who doesn't believe in evolution -  has admitted he believes Global Warming is real.)

             

            I heard that one of the bargaining chips the opponents require to this agreement Congress made to open the Atlantic coast to offshore oil drilling was to include a doubling of the tax credit to homeowners installing solar panels from $2,000 to $4,000. An industry expert said it's a start but if they were serious they would have made it $10,000 to $15,000. Then, who WOULDN'T go solar!? That is my biggest beef with the energy crisis and the ridiculous plans they come up with (MORE subsidies to the oil industry). And the big argument is that we can't afford to make the changes overnight to renewable energy, it will take years to develop technology. HELL YES we can! The technology is already here and available. It the government was serious about solving the problem it could be done "overnight"! (By the way, thank you, Mr. Reagan, for gutting all the renewable energy programs President Carter initiated while he was in office! Thanks for steering us BACK on course down this road to dependence on foreign fossil fuel!)

             

            Bill Tarbox

            Magnolia, TX

          • David Power
            If you go to the PUC website and look for project 34610 that would be a good place to start. there are a lot of materials and responses to go through. David
            Message 5 of 26 , Oct 1, 2008
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              If you go to the PUC website and look for project 34610 that would be a good place to start. there are a lot of materials and responses to go through.

              David
              On Sep 29, 2008, at 9:22 PM, Stephanie Edwards-Musa wrote:


              Hi David,

              Where can I find information on all of this stuff?

              On Mon, Sep 29, 2008 at 9:18 PM, David Power <dpower@hal-pc. org> wrote:

              Actually they are in the process of changing the meters, The smart meter initiative at the PUC has been a long hard battle but the new meters will have significant features available to the home owner not just the utility.  Current hearings are being held on the HAN or Home Area Network support of the system and the standards that are proposed to interface with it.

              The Itron Openway system that is proposed for the Centerpoint deployment is one of the most advanced, open standards supported systems developed to date.

              David Power
              Green Planet Energy


              On Sep 29, 2008, at 7:11 PM, Stephanie Edwards-Musa wrote:


              Hi Jim, 

              Out of curiosity what did the lobbyists not like about? Was there junk in the proposal they didn't like? Or just the obvious costs of replacing the meters?  

              On Mon, Sep 29, 2008 at 7:08 PM, <youragentsteph@ gmail.com> wrote:
              Jim, 

              Out of curiosity what did the lobbyists not like about? Was there junk in the proposal they didn't like? Or just the obvious costs of replacing the meters?

              Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry



              From: "Jim & Janet" <jhd1@earthlink. net>
              Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2008 18:54:12 -0500
              To: <hreg@yahoogroups. com>
              Subject: Re: [hreg] Re:Dear Centerpoint Energy-

              The cost for implementing the solar incentive, the one that failed in Texas 2007 legislative session, would have saddled every INVESTOR OWNED electric utility customer with a whopping fifty cents per thousand kilowatt hours on every bill.
              The "utility" would bear only the expenses of changing the billing and, eventually, replacing everyones kWhr meter with a digital one.
              Now everyone needs to turn at once and glare at the utility lobby for blocking this no-brainer solution.
               
              Jim Duncan
              North Texas Renewable Energy Inc
              817.917.057
              ntrei@earthlink. net

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Jay Ring
              Sent: Monday, September 29, 2008 3:52 PM
              Subject: [hreg] Re:Dear Centerpoint Energy-

              There are a lot of reasons to go solar, some good, some bad, and some
              with subjective costs and benefits where reasonable people can disagreee.

              All I am saying is that you can't get Centerpoint (or anyone else) to
              pay for it. Companies don't pay for these things - their customers do.

              By the way, can you provide some information on the new $4000 credit?
              When does it go into effect? I've been planning on doing an install
              sometime around May 2009, but I would happily accelerate or delay to
              benefit from an extra 2K.

              Thanks!

              - Jay

              --- In hreg@yahoogroups. com, "Bill Tarbox" <btarbox@...> wrote:
              >
              > Just to add to your argument for converting to solar, if we did so it
              > would reduce the need for coal-fired power plants and other fossil fuel
              > generated power sources. This alone, would help solve a number of major
              > problems facing us. It's now a well-established fact that green-house
              > gases (created from energy generation) has a direct link to both global
              > climate change and the recent development of more severe hurricanes (6
              > of the 10 worst hurricanes on record have occurred in the last 10 years,
              > 3 in 2005 alone). My point is, that converting to solar would also help
              > reduce the potential for even more devastating hurricanes. (Even our
              > "president" - who doesn't believe in evolution - has admitted he
              > believes Global Warming is real.)
              > 
              > I heard that one of the bargaining chips the opponents require to this
              > agreement Congress made to open the Atlantic coast to offshore oil
              > drilling was to include a doubling of the tax credit to homeowners
              > installing solar panels from $2,000 to $4,000. An industry expert said
              > it's a start but if they were serious they would have made it $10,000 to
              > $15,000. Then, who WOULDN'T go solar!? That is my biggest beef with the
              > energy crisis and the ridiculous plans they come up with (MORE subsidies
              > to the oil industry). And the big argument is that we can't afford to
              > make the changes overnight to renewable energy, it will take years to
              > develop technology. HELL YES we can! The technology is already here and
              > available. It the government was serious about solving the problem it
              > could be done "overnight"! (By the way, thank you, Mr. Reagan, for
              > gutting all the renewable energy programs President Carter initiated
              > while he was in office! Thanks for steering us BACK on course down this
              > road to dependence on foreign fossil fuel!)
              > 
              > Bill Tarbox
              > Magnolia, TX
              >




              -- 

              Stephanie Edwards-Musa
              Realtor, Certified EcoBroker
              Mobile:  281-635-9444
              Prudential Gary Greene, Realtors
              www.TurningHoustonG reen.com
              Steph@TurningHousto nGreen.com





              -- 
              Stephanie Edwards-Musa
              Realtor, Certified EcoBroker
              Mobile:  281-635-9444
              Prudential Gary Greene, Realtors
              www.TurningHoustonG reen.com
              Steph@TurningHousto nGreen.com


            • David Power
              The project is known as AMIT or the Advanced Metering Infrastructure Team, They have several projects working, meter features (finished we think), HAN Home
              Message 6 of 26 , Oct 1, 2008
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                The project is known as AMIT  or the Advanced Metering Infrastructure Team,
                They have several projects working, meter features (finished we think), HAN "Home area Network",RMI Retail market interface (this is the web site that you can go and look at your rates utilization and consumption figures). The will also be working on security of the network and of the web sites, audit structures and data storage.

                I started working on this a couple of years back and some pretty good features and technologies have been put into the system as well as the adoption of open standards (YEA) for the network. Texas will have one of the most advanced metering infrastructures and have adopted more open standards then just about anyplace in the world when finished. 

                The utilities in southern california and Ontario started pushing for this and it took a while for the meter manufactures and utilities to get with the program but things are moving right along.

                See the Green Grid, UtilityAMI and ansi c12.22 for the latest.

                The technology would have really helped after the hurricane speeding the identification of repair sites.

                David

                On Oct 1, 2008, at 5:06 PM, David Power wrote:

                If you go to the PUC website and look for project 34610 that would be a good place to start. there are a lot of materials and responses to go through.


                David
                On Sep 29, 2008, at 9:22 PM, Stephanie Edwards-Musa wrote:


                Hi David,

                Where can I find information on all of this stuff?

                On Mon, Sep 29, 2008 at 9:18 PM, David Power <dpower@hal-pc. org> wrote:

                Actually they are in the process of changing the meters, The smart meter initiative at the PUC has been a long hard battle but the new meters will have significant features available to the home owner not just the utility.  Current hearings are being held on the HAN or Home Area Network support of the system and the standards that are proposed to interface with it.

                The Itron Openway system that is proposed for the Centerpoint deployment is one of the most advanced, open standards supported systems developed to date.

                David Power
                Green Planet Energy

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