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Re: [hreg] Sapphire Green

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  • Garth & Kim Travis
    Greetings, Put some water out in the sun and wait, you will soon have lots of algae. Ask anyone with a swimming pool. Bright Blessings, Kim
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 14, 2008
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      Greetings,
      Put some water out in the sun and wait, you will soon have lots of
      algae. Ask anyone with a swimming pool.
      Bright Blessings,
      Kim

      evelyn sardina wrote:
      > Correct me if I am wrong but algae is a derivative of coal....
      >
      >
    • tms_lz129
      Algae is not a derivative of coal. Coal is the compressed remains of plants that grew and accumulated in wet environments and were buried without decomposing.
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 16, 2008
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        Algae is not a derivative of coal. Coal is the compressed remains
        of plants that grew and accumulated in wet environments and were
        buried without decomposing. The lack of decomposition is due to the
        lack of oxygen in the bottoms of the swamps and lagoons where the
        ancient forests grew. Those conditions also caused the sulfer we
        associate with coal to accumulate.

        Oil is different and is more closely associated with the microscopic
        remains of the animal life that rains down onto the ocean floor from
        above. Those sediments when "cooked" make the liquid carbon
        compounds we collectively refer to as petroleum.

        Using any biomass to generate power, whether it be of a fossil
        nature or not, is going to add carbon dioxide to the atmosphere
        unless the waste gases are sequestered somehow.


        In hreg@yahoogroups.com, evelyn sardina <evelynsardina@...> wrote:
        >
        > Correct me if I am wrong but algae is a derivative of coal....
        >
        > William <stangfam@...> wrote: I am excited about this!!
        After long discussions about "what is fossil
        > fuel" it seems we do not need to wait for millions/billions of
        years to
        > make plant life and algae into fuel!! Isn't that exciting? The
        links
        > below are quite interesting and I'm hoping for some good input.
        >
        > http://www.latimes.com/news/science/environment/la-fi-greencrude29-
        > 2008may29,0,7208016.story
        > http://www.sapphireenergy.com/mediacenter/press_release/1
        >
        > Maybe instead of this;
        >
        > http://www.americansolutions.com/actioncenter/petitions/?
        Guid=54ec6e43-
        > 75a8-445b-aa7b-346a1e096659
        >
      • Robert Johnston
        Biomass doesn t typically add NET load of CO2 to the atmosphere since it consumes CO2 to grow. From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hreg@yahoogroups.com] On
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 16, 2008
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          Biomass doesn’t typically add NET load of CO2 to the atmosphere since it consumes CO2 to grow.

           

          From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hreg@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of tms_lz129
          Sent: Monday, June 16, 2008 1:10 PM
          To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [hreg] Algae vs coal

           

          Algae is not a derivative of coal. Coal is the compressed remains
          of plants that grew and accumulated in wet environments and were
          buried without decomposing. The lack of decomposition is due to the
          lack of oxygen in the bottoms of the swamps and lagoons where the
          ancient forests grew. Those conditions also caused the sulfer we
          associate with coal to accumulate.

          Oil is different and is more closely associated with the microscopic
          remains of the animal life that rains down onto the ocean floor from
          above. Those sediments when "cooked" make the liquid carbon
          compounds we collectively refer to as petroleum.

          Using any biomass to generate power, whether it be of a fossil
          nature or not, is going to add carbon dioxide to the atmosphere
          unless the waste gases are sequestered somehow.

          In hreg@yahoogroups.com, evelyn sardina <evelynsardina@...> wrote:

          >
          > Correct me if I am wrong but algae is a derivative of coal....
          >
          > William <stangfam@...> wrote: I am excited about this!!
          After long discussions about "what is fossil
          > fuel" it seems we do not need to wait for millions/billions of
          years to
          > make plant life and algae into fuel!! Isn't that exciting? The
          links
          > below are quite interesting and I'm hoping for some good input.
          >
          >
          href="http://www.latimes.com/news/science/environment/la-fi-greencrude29-">http://www.latimes.com/news/science/environment/la-fi-greencrude29-
          > 2008may29,0,7208016.story
          > http://www.sapphireenergy.com/mediacenter/press_release/1
          >
          > Maybe instead of this;
          >
          > http://www.americansolutions.com/actioncenter/petitions/?
          Guid=54ec6e43-
          > 75a8-445b-aa7b-346a1e096659
          >

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