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Re: [hreg] solar car porch

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  • John Miggins
    Possibly but not likely, solar panels (traditional make 10 to 14 watts per square foot) so they alone cost at 12 watts per square foot $60.00. thin film or
    Message 1 of 39 , Mar 23, 2008
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      Possibly but not likely, solar panels (traditional make 10 to 14 watts per square foot) so they alone cost at 12 watts per square foot $60.00.  thin film or roll out might be cheaper per square foot but most likely will only produce 5 to 6 watts per square foot. thus $45 for 6 watts is (what is the math?)  $7.5 per watt or so.  you are buying watts, the cheapest per watt is not always the best for your application.
      Even if they are even, the area needed is double or more. Warehouse applications that then can be laminated to the roof might be cheaper.  
       
      what brand were they?   
       
      John Miggins
      Area Manager
      Standard Renewable Energy
      (713) 231-7665 Cell
      (281) 768-4915 (Fax)
       
       
      jmiggins@...
      www.sre3.com
      “We make using renewable energy easy”
       

      This message and/or attachments ("Communication") is proprietary to Standard Renewable Energy and/or its affiliates.  The information contained in this message may be legally privileged and/or confidential and protected from disclosure.  If the reader of this message is not the intended recipient, or an employee or an agent responsible for delivering this message to the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any unauthorized disclosure, dissemination, distribution, copying or the taking of any action in reliance on the information herein is strictly prohibited.  If y
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Saturday, March 22, 2008 10:36 AM
      Subject: Re: [hreg] solar car porch

      Hey, John, what about the roll out solar sheets that were supposed to come out as residential this January?  I had called about them and they quoted me a price of $45 a foot.
       
      Would that be cheaper?
       
      The best way to do this is with a standard grid tie system thereby you make the power when you can and use it when needed.  depending on the power requirements from the car we could figure out how many kWh would be used/required per day. 
       
      Most likely you will be faced with a limitation on roof size or budget so a standard sized system of 2400 watts would be a good start.  This would run around $19,000 installed but give you free energy for 25 years.
       
       
      John Miggins
      Area Manager
      Standard Renewable Energy
      (713) 231-7665 Cell
      (281) 768-4915 (Fax)
       
       
      jmiggins@sre3. com
      www.sre3.com
      “We make using renewable energy easy”
       

      This message and/or attachments ("Communication" ) is proprietary to Standard Renewable Energy and/or its affiliates.  The information contained in this message may be legally privileged and/or confidential and protected from disclosure.  If the reader of this message is not the intended recipient, or an employee or an agent responsible for delivering this message to the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any unauthorized disclosure, dissemination, distribution, copying or the taking of any action in reliance on the information herein is strictly prohibited.  If y
      ----- Original Message -----
      To: hreg
      Sent: Friday, March 21, 2008 2:29 PM
      Subject: [hreg] solar car porch

      If a person wanted to have an electric car and wanted to power it with solar panels... How many watts of solar would the person need? I heard that it is the most intelligent way to go as far as solar and I was curious about it. Does anyone know how much would be needed?

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    • streamline.rm
      Kevin, Thanks for the response, I didn t mean that your company stands behind only 80%, I realize my wording was not clear. I guess a better example of what
      Message 39 of 39 , Mar 31, 2008
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        Kevin,
        Thanks for the response, I didn't mean that your company stands
        behind only 80%, I realize my wording was not clear. I guess a
        better example of what I meant is as most companies with their
        products, they stand 100% behind a certain point, and warantee that.
        If the user wants to go past that, they can, but void warranties.
        Like computer guys do with Chips. They will work faster than "RATED
        BY INTEL", but, Intel won't warranty it if they find evidence of
        tampering, or, a Chevy truck, when someone alters the suspension
        drastically, GM will not warranty it.

        Anyways, now I understand what you mean. And yes, it makes sense,
        that a whole system is different than one cell. I checked out your
        website, I'd love to see one of your installations, and make a report
        on it on our website. The hybrid system is very cool, as well as the
        mini Wi-Fi.

        Best Regards,

        George J. Strnad
        800-391-2291
        www.alternateenergycentral.com



        --- In hreg@yahoogroups.com, "Kevin Conlin" <kconlin@...> wrote:
        >
        > George, No to both questions. You cannot cook a PV module to provide
        > excess power, and we don't stand behind anything 80%, we stand behind
        > everything we do 100%. It's not just a simple matter of derating the PV
        > panel 20%, we assume a system efficiency of 80%, which is much different
        > than derating the panel 20%, then after looking at the worst month in 30
        > years, we make sure there is 20% "head room" as a safety margin.
        You may
        > consider it a matter of semantics, but if fact we are talking about two
        > entirely different things. Stand alone system sizing is a whole lot
        more
        > than simply derating the PV module, however, if a panel is rated -5% and
        > +10%, then it is prudent to derate it 5% at the onset of the system
        design.
        >
        >
        >
        > Hope I'm not confusing the issue even more.....
        >
        >
        >
        > Kevin
        >
        >
        >
        > _____
        >
        > From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hreg@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
        > streamline.rm
        > Sent: Saturday, March 29, 2008 9:30 AM
        > To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [hreg] Re: solar car porch
        >
        >
        >
        > Hey Kevin,
        >
        > So, that brings me to a question, if You are derateing these panels,
        > can someone go into them and boost their performance? Like
        > "overclocking" guys do to their Intel chips? Or, are your panels
        > just capable of producing 20% better out of the box, but your company
        > just stands behind 80%.
        >
        > George J. Strnad
        > 800-391-2291
        > www.alternateenergycentral.com
        >
        > --- In hreg@yahoogroups. <mailto:hreg%40yahoogroups.com> com, "Kevin
        Conlin"
        > <kconlin@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Hi Jim, A minor correction, perhaps I didn't explain myself
        adequately.
        > > For weather data, we look at the NREL 30 year data, pick the worst
        > month in
        > > 30 years, and that is our design month. We derate the PV output 20%
        > to allow
        > > for system losses, battery charging efficiency, dusty modules,
        etc..THEN
        > > make sure we have at least a 20% safety factor (head room) on top of
        > that.
        > > This strategy generally results in our systems being larger than our
        > > competitors, and if the purchase is simply price driven, we lose
        > every time.
        > > BUT, if the customer needs high reliability, and has hundreds of
        > systems, we
        > > cannot afford to have massive failures during a bad winter. In the
        > oil and
        > > gas industry, where a dead battery on an offshore platform might
        > cost $2000
        > > to replace, our customers have come to understand the importance of
        > > conservative design. I always tell my customers to "consider the
        > > consequences of failure"
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > More than once a lost account has come back after experiencing the
        > joys of
        > > buying the lowest cost system.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Sorry for any confusion.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Best, Kevin
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > _____
        > >
        > > From: hreg@yahoogroups. <mailto:hreg%40yahoogroups.com> com
        > [mailto:hreg@yahoogroups. <mailto:hreg%40yahoogroups.com> com] On Behalf
        > Of Jim &
        > > Janet
        > > Sent: Friday, March 28, 2008 2:47 PM
        > > To: hreg@yahoogroups. <mailto:hreg%40yahoogroups.com> com
        > > Subject: Re: [hreg] Re: solar car porch
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > The 20% Kevin speaks of is known as the derate factor for a PV
        > system. In
        > > the real world, a 3 kW PV array won't put out 3 kW of AC power due to
        > > derating. You can see what the percentages of the losses are
        > attributed to
        > > at the PVWATTS site.
        > >
        > > http://rredc. <http://rredc.
        > <http://rredc.nrel.gov/solar/codes_algs/PVWATTS/version1/>
        > nrel.gov/solar/codes_algs/PVWATTS/version1/>
        > > nrel.gov/solar/codes_algs/PVWATTS/version1/
        > >
        > > * Pick Texas & a city.
        > > * Click on "Derate Factor Help". Note the default percent given to
        > > soiling.
        > > * Click on "Help" for details about derating including soiling.
        > >
        > > While 5% does not sound like a lot, over the 30 year life of a PV
        > system it
        > > can add up to a lot of lost power. And it's not that much work to
        > squirt the
        > > array with a hose to get off the worst of the dust. Just don't ever
        > wet the
        > > modules during mid-day full sun, while they are hot.
        > >
        > > Jim Duncan
        > >
        > > North Texas Renewable Energy Inc
        > > 817.917.057
        > > ntrei@earthlink. <mailto:ntrei@> net
        > >
        > > www.ntrei.com
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ----- Original Message -----
        > >
        > > From: Chris <mailto:boyer.chris@> Boyer
        > >
        > > To: hreg@yahoogroups. <mailto:hreg@yahoogroups.
        > <mailto:hreg%40yahoogroups.com> com> com
        > >
        > > Sent: Friday, March 28, 2008 12:17 PM
        > >
        > > Subject: [hreg] Re: solar car porch
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Mr. Han,
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > I have a solar system. It is covered with pollen right now because
        > we have
        > > pine trees all around us and we have not had rain in a while. I
        can not
        > > tell that I am loosing any performance - I'm probably loosing a
        > little, but
        > > not enough that I can tell. I expect the pollen will be washed off
        > in the
        > > first rain (I'll let you know after the rain we're supposed to get
        this
        > > weekend). You said that solar PV needs maintenance because it needs
        > to be
        > > washed - is this statement based on hearsay, or experience from
        your own
        > > system.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > The glass on solar panels are pretty much self-cleaning if they are
        > > installed at a tilt. I understand that there are systems installed
        > > horizontally on flat roofs in California (and I have seen some) that
        > have to
        > > be cleaned because they don't get much rain and without a tilt,
        the dirt
        > > just pools on the panels.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > For others that have systems out there, do you have to clean your
        > panels?
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > -Chris
        > >
        >
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