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RE: [hreg] nanotubes

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  • Robert Johnston
    Ariel, This is not a new concept. It has already been discussed for several years in the nanotech scientific community as well as among regulators. I m not
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 7, 2007
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      Ariel,

       

      This is not a new concept.  It has already been discussed for several years in the nanotech scientific community as well as among regulators.  I’m not part of that scientific community, but I read about it in Chemical & Engineering News regularly.  Many companies and universities working on nanotech have instituted strong safeguards using the precautionary principle since the hazards are not yet sufficiently known.  Rice University has done some of the work on the EH&S aspects of nanotubes.  While it is worthwhile to understand the risks, I think the leading researchers are well aware of the potential that exists.  I’m not sure it is something worth spending much time agonizing over here.  You are correct in pointing out that the hazard risk is very low once the nanoparticles or nanotubes are embedded in a matrix compound.


      Robert

       

       


      From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto: hreg@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Ariel Thomann
      Sent: Wednesday, November 07, 2007 10:34 PM
      To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [hreg] nanotubes

       

      Yes, neither chrysotile, crocidolite, amosite, anthophyllite, tremolite or
      actinolite are tubular. Nor are they carbon.

      Any number of chemically very different types of respirable dusts between 0.5
      and 5 microns in size have a bad habit of lodging in pulmonary alveoli (larger
      ones don't make it that far down, smaller ones are breathed back out). If they
      get trapped there, they can cause their respective pneumoconioses over the next
      several decades. Nanotubes are smaller by several orders of magnitude, so maybe
      they get exhaled -- but, does anybody KNOW that? Might they be adsorbed by the
      moisture lining the alveoli? If so, could they go through the alveaolar
      capillariy walls and be distributed throughtout the body? If so, what effect
      will they have in what organs? How long will it take before we have the answers
      to these and other questions we don't even know how to ask yet?

      Again, I'm not equating nanotubes with asbestos. All I'm saying is -- beware of
      unintended consequences.

      Ariel
      - We are all Human beings here together. We have to help one another, since
      otherwise there is NO ONE who will help.
      - All countries need a NO REGRETS strategic energy policy. Think ahead 7
      generations.
      ------------ --------- --------- ------

      > Asbestos fibers are not actually tubes but tightly rolled sheets of
      molecules
      > in a crystal lattice. Both the particle size and the
      > exposed atoms at the edge of the roll probably contribute to the
      > latent carcinogenicity of the materials. Carbon nanotubes are more likely
      to
      > cause ailments related to fine dusts but those diseases only occur with
      gross
      > exposures over long periods and this is unlikely except where they are
      being
      > manufactured. If nanotubes ever are
      > manufactured in quantity then end of life considerations will
      > certainly be relevant.

    • Ariel Thomann
      Robert - merci! Over and out on this topic. Ariel - We are all Human beings here together. We have to help one another, since otherwise there is NO ONE who
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 7, 2007
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        Robert - merci! "Over and out" on this topic.

        Ariel
        - We are all Human beings here together. We have to help one another, since
        otherwise there is NO ONE who will help.
        - All countries need a NO REGRETS strategic energy policy. Think ahead 7
        generations.
        ------------------------------------

        > Ariel,
        >
        >
        >
        > This is not a new concept. It has already been discussed for several years in
        > the nanotech scientific community as well as among regulators. I'm not part
        > of that scientific community, but I read about it in Chemical & Engineering
        > News regularly. Many companies and universities working on nanotech have
        > instituted strong safeguards using the precautionary principle since the
        > hazards are not yet sufficiently known. Rice University has done some of the
        > work on the EH&S aspects of nanotubes. While it is worthwhile to understand
        > the risks, I think the leading researchers are well aware of the potential
        > that exists. I'm not sure it is something worth spending much time agonizing
        > over here. You are correct in pointing out that the hazard risk is very low
        > once the nanoparticles or nanotubes are embedded in a matrix compound.
        >
        >
        > Robert
        >
        >
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