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UK's theory on growing biofuels w/ocean algae

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  • William
    Farming algae for gas and oil production? Link at the bottom of the page. It s outside the box thinking like this that may one day fall on a concept that
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 1, 2007
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      Farming algae for gas and oil production? Link at the bottom of the
      page.
      It's "outside the box" thinking like this that may one day fall on a
      concept that utilizes energy production in parallel with the Earths
      ecosystems instead of agaist them. Maybe captive ponds would give
      better insurance to not disrupt current environs, with the possibilty
      of hydro-electric being generated with any of the fall/movement of
      waters.
      In a microcosm take the bayous of our areas. It has taken an immense
      amount of energy and materials to corral and direct natural/flood
      waters thru the city yet, there is no thought of using that moving
      water to generate energy back into our system. While working with TPWD
      & Harris Co. Flood Control to give natural areas considerations think
      of the output given our heavy storms and runoff? Small micro-
      generating plants at flood control gates, every existing structure
      that crosses the bayous(bridges/spillways). I think our rainfall total
      this year is around 53 inches, multiply that against what COULD have
      been generated? I realize it is not an answer to total energy
      independence but it may add to what we need. Another part of the
      answer. Just a science fiction day dream of what could be achieved if
      scientists are looking at growing algae for oil/gas.
      Any thoughts on the reality of this out there?
      11/1/07 barrel of crude 96.00 and counting......Bill


      http://motoring.reuters.co.uk/reuters/vocmain.jsp?lnk=101&id=2432
    • Stephanie Edwards-Musa
      Hi William, A professor at the University of Hawaii is working on a similar project. Essentially they would use CO2 emissions from existing plants to grow
      Message 2 of 6 , Nov 1, 2007
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        Hi William,

        A professor at the University of Hawaii is working on a similar
        project. Essentially they would use CO2 emissions from existing
        plants to 'grow' the algae (pond scum) and mix with sunlight. Here
        is a link for Professor Fu's project. It is very interesting.

        http://the.honoluluadvertiser.com/article/2007/May/12/ln/FP705120347.h
        tml/?print=on

        Thanks for sending us a great link!

        --- In hreg@yahoogroups.com, "William" <stangfam@...> wrote:
        >
        > Farming algae for gas and oil production? Link at the bottom of the
        > page.
        > It's "outside the box" thinking like this that may one day fall on
        a
        > concept that utilizes energy production in parallel with the Earths
        > ecosystems instead of agaist them. Maybe captive ponds would give
        > better insurance to not disrupt current environs, with the
        possibilty
        > of hydro-electric being generated with any of the fall/movement of
        > waters.
        > In a microcosm take the bayous of our areas. It has taken an
        immense
        > amount of energy and materials to corral and direct natural/flood
        > waters thru the city yet, there is no thought of using that moving
        > water to generate energy back into our system. While working with
        TPWD
        > & Harris Co. Flood Control to give natural areas considerations
        think
        > of the output given our heavy storms and runoff? Small micro-
        > generating plants at flood control gates, every existing structure
        > that crosses the bayous(bridges/spillways). I think our rainfall
        total
        > this year is around 53 inches, multiply that against what COULD
        have
        > been generated? I realize it is not an answer to total energy
        > independence but it may add to what we need. Another part of the
        > answer. Just a science fiction day dream of what could be achieved
        if
        > scientists are looking at growing algae for oil/gas.
        > Any thoughts on the reality of this out there?
        > 11/1/07 barrel of crude 96.00 and counting......Bill
        >
        >
        > http://motoring.reuters.co.uk/reuters/vocmain.jsp?lnk=101&id=2432
        >
      • Ariel Thomann
        And there was the article about algae in West Texas from a recent HouChron see: http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/chronicle/5195599.html Ariel - We are all
        Message 3 of 6 , Nov 1, 2007
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          And there was the article about algae in West Texas from a recent HouChron see:
          http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/chronicle/5195599.html

          Ariel
          - We are all Human beings here together. We have to help one another, since
          otherwise there is NO ONE who will help.
          - All countries need a NO REGRETS strategic energy policy. Think ahead 7
          generations.
          ------------------------------------

          > Hi William,
          >
          > A professor at the University of Hawaii is working on a similar
          > project. Essentially they would use CO2 emissions from existing
          > plants to 'grow' the algae (pond scum) and mix with sunlight. Here is a link
          > for Professor Fu's project. It is very interesting.
          >
          > http://the.honoluluadvertiser.com/article/2007/May/12/ln/FP705120347.h
          > tml/?print=on
          >
          > Thanks for sending us a great link!
          >
          > --- In hreg@yahoogroups.com, "William" <stangfam@...> wrote:
          >>
          >> Farming algae for gas and oil production? Link at the bottom of the page.
          >> It's "outside the box" thinking like this that may one day fall on
          > a
          >> concept that utilizes energy production in parallel with the Earths
          >> ecosystems instead of agaist them. Maybe captive ponds would give better
          >> insurance to not disrupt current environs, with the
          > possibilty
          >> of hydro-electric being generated with any of the fall/movement of waters.
          >> In a microcosm take the bayous of our areas. It has taken an
          > immense
          >> amount of energy and materials to corral and direct natural/flood waters
          >> thru the city yet, there is no thought of using that moving water to
          >> generate energy back into our system. While working with
          > TPWD
          >> & Harris Co. Flood Control to give natural areas considerations
          > think
          >> of the output given our heavy storms and runoff? Small micro-
          >> generating plants at flood control gates, every existing structure that
          >> crosses the bayous(bridges/spillways). I think our rainfall
          > total
          >> this year is around 53 inches, multiply that against what COULD
          > have
          >> been generated? I realize it is not an answer to total energy
          >> independence but it may add to what we need. Another part of the answer.
          >> Just a science fiction day dream of what could be achieved
          > if
          >> scientists are looking at growing algae for oil/gas.
          >> Any thoughts on the reality of this out there?
          >> 11/1/07 barrel of crude 96.00 and counting......Bill
          >>
          >>
          >> http://motoring.reuters.co.uk/reuters/vocmain.jsp?lnk=101&id=2432
        • Ed Sarlls
          I had to go to http://www.chron.com/CDA/archives/archive.mpl?id=2007_4438360 to find it. Might save everyone from doing a search. A Google search for algae
          Message 4 of 6 , Nov 1, 2007
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            Might save everyone from doing a search.
             
            A Google search for "algae fuel Boeing " gives 143,000 hits. Aircraft companies would go out of business without fuel so alternate sources are getting a lot of attention. This is a good time for anyone who can find a more efficient algae or a better method of growing it.
             
            Ed Sarlls
             
             
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Thursday, November 01, 2007 5:10 PM
            Subject: Re: [hreg] Re: UK's theory on growing biofuels w/ocean algae

            And there was the article about algae in West Texas from a recent HouChron see:
            http://www.chron. com/disp/ story.mpl/ chronicle/ 5195599.html

            Ariel
            - We are all Human beings here together. We have to help one another, since
            otherwise there is NO ONE who will help.
            - All countries need a NO REGRETS strategic energy policy. Think ahead 7
            generations.
            ------------ --------- --------- ------

            > Hi William,
            >
            > A professor at the University of Hawaii is working on a similar
            > project. Essentially they would use CO2 emissions from existing
            > plants to 'grow' the algae (pond scum) and mix with sunlight. Here is a link
            > for Professor Fu's project. It is very interesting.
            >
            > http://the.honolulu advertiser. com/article/ 2007/May/ 12/ln/FP70512034 7.h
            > tml/?print=on
            >
            > Thanks for sending us a great link!
            >
            > --- In hreg@yahoogroups. com, "William" <stangfam@.. .> wrote:
            >>
            >> Farming algae for gas and oil production? Link at the bottom of the page.
            >> It's "outside the box" thinking like this that may one day fall on
            > a
            >> concept that utilizes energy production in parallel with the Earths
            >> ecosystems instead of agaist them. Maybe captive ponds would give better
            >> insurance to not disrupt current environs, with the
            > possibilty
            >> of hydro-electric being generated with any of the fall/movement of waters.
            >> In a microcosm take the bayous of our areas. It has taken an
            > immense
            >> amount of energy and materials to corral and direct natural/flood waters
            >> thru the city yet, there is no thought of using that moving water to
            >> generate energy back into our system. While working with
            > TPWD
            >> & Harris Co. Flood Control to give natural areas considerations
            > think
            >> of the output given our heavy storms and runoff? Small micro-
            >> generating plants at flood control gates, every existing structure that
            >> crosses the bayous(bridges/ spillways) . I think our rainfall
            > total
            >> this year is around 53 inches, multiply that against what COULD
            > have
            >> been generated? I realize it is not an answer to total energy
            >> independence but it may add to what we need. Another part of the answer.
            >> Just a science fiction day dream of what could be achieved
            > if
            >> scientists are looking at growing algae for oil/gas.
            >> Any thoughts on the reality of this out there?
            >> 11/1/07 barrel of crude 96.00 and counting.... ..Bill
            >>
            >>
            >> http://motoring. reuters.co. uk/reuters/ vocmain.jsp? lnk=101&id= 2432

          • William & Cynthia Stange
            Since we call our planet the Blue Planet and that 75 % (+/-) of the Earths surface is water I d say that it s a safe bet it is not only do-able but there are
            Message 5 of 6 , Nov 1, 2007
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              Since we call our planet the "Blue Planet" and that 75 % (+/-) of the Earths surface is water I'd say that it's a safe bet it is not only do-able but there are plenty of people already working on it. I have an older book "Seafarm" by Elisabeth Mann Borgese in it there is a description of Florida and their blue-green algae. This strain of algae easily produces Hydrogen as part of its waste product. According to Akira Matsui ,U. of Miami researcher "all the energy a home uses in Florida could be drawn from an algae tank 8 meters square and 1 meter deep. That book was published in 1980!!  Only 15% of our deep oceans have even been explored, there is so much more to know of our oceans (that we are currently destroying).
              www.ocean.com is a great resource to see current and future prospects from the sea. Click the news button to reveal the oldest living animal on earth is an Arctic clam at 405 years old? We seem to have a lot to learn. Bill
              Ed Sarlls <edsarlls@...> wrote:
               
              Might save everyone from doing a search.
               
              A Google search for "algae fuel Boeing " gives 143,000 hits. Aircraft companies would go out of business without fuel so alternate sources are getting a lot of attention. This is a good time for anyone who can find a more efficient algae or a better method of growing it.
               
              Ed Sarlls
               
               
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Thursday, November 01, 2007 5:10 PM

            • Gary Beck
              It is great to read several news releases on different cell biologicals plants used for hydrogen and biodiesel fuel production. There is nothing man-made that
              Message 6 of 6 , Nov 2, 2007
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                It is great to read several news releases on different cell biologicals plants used for hydrogen and biodiesel fuel production.  There is nothing man-made that can compete with the cellular efficiencies offered by simple biologicals.  

                 

                Since the only companies that can finance, design, and build commercial bio plants on a large scale are the Oil & Gas majors. So the next news announcement I am looking for will be from Llyondell, BP, Shell, or ExxonMobil.  It will be for a new ship channel based ‘biocogen’ power plant that will produce electricity, hydrogen, and biodiesel.   

                 

                Gary Beck, P.E., LEED AP

                Eco-Holdings LLC - Engineering Services

                4010 Blue Bonnet Blvd., Ste 114, Houston , TX 77025

                Tel: 713-377-4209, Fax: 832-201-5338 Cell: 713-530-1950

                "Where Sustainability is Engineered" 

                 


                From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto: hreg@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of William & Cynthia Stange
                Sent: Thursday, November 01, 2007 8:46 PM
                To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [hreg] Re: UK 's theory on growing biofuels w/ocean algae

                 

                Since we call our planet the "Blue Planet" and that 75 % (+/-) of the Earths surface is water I'd say that it's a safe bet it is not only do-able but there are plenty of people already working on it. I have an older book "Seafarm" by Elisabeth Mann Borgese in it there is a description of Florida and their blue-green algae. This strain of algae easily produces Hydrogen as part of its waste product. According to Akira Matsui , U. of Miami researcher "all the energy a home uses in Florida could be drawn from an algae tank 8 meters square and 1 meter deep. That book was published in 1980!!  Only 15% of our deep oceans have even been explored, there is so much more to know of our oceans (that we are currently destroying).
                is a great resource to see current and future prospects from the sea. Click the news button to reveal the oldest living animal on earth is an Arctic clam at 405 years old? We seem to have a lot to learn. Bill
                Ed Sarlls <edsarlls@comcast. net> wrote:

                 

                Might save everyone from doing a search.

                 

                A Google search for "algae fuel Boeing " gives 143,000 hits. Aircraft companies would go out of business without fuel so alternate sources are getting a lot of attention. This is a good time for anyone who can find a more efficient algae or a better method of growing it.

                 

                Ed Sarlls

                 

                 

                ----- Original Message -----

                Sent: Thursday, November 01, 2007 5:10 PM

                 

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