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Re: [hreg] Re:Pedal Power

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  • phil6142@aol.com
    I built a stand and connected to a bike similar to the one you mention building. I got the bike for free because my brother was going to throw it away but
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 4, 2007
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      I built a stand and connected to a bike similar to the one you mention building.  I got the bike for free because my brother was going to throw it away but other than that my costs were about what you mentioned.  Except that I also bought a something like a timing belt for a car (about $15 at autozone) to connect the alternator to the back tire of the bike.  I used steel to make the frame because I have a friend who runs a machine shop and could get most of the pieces for me free because they were scrap I did have to buy one longer piece which we cut up to make the base (about another $30) my friend also did the welding for free for me so if you don't know how to weld that will add some cost.  Though I don't see any reason why you can't build the frame out of 2x4's and nails. 
       
      My total cost was a little over $200 I think but that is cheaper than the exercise bike that my wife wanted to buy and that one would not produce any power.  The design that we used has a square base with a stand on the front to support the space where the front tire used to be the back of the support goes above the bike with a cross bar going over the back tire.  The alternator is bolted to the cross bar and the timing belt goes around the back tire and is supported by the alternator.  This also holds tension on the belt while the rider sits on it.  If you are interested in a picture send me an email and I will send you one as I am sure not everyone on the email list is interested in my little bike stand. 
       
      I am not sure what is the total power that we have produced from the bike but it is certainly less than the $200 that I spent on it.  But the bike has alot more value than simply the power it has produced.  Primarily the cost of buying a manufactured exercise bike for use in my home.  Additionally when Rita came through last year my neighborhood lost power for about 20 hours and during that time we had power to run the computer for internet connection and TV for news updates as well as a fan to keep us cool that night.  All thanks to the power generated by my little bicycle and that power was worth alot more than retail cost.  Plus I am one of those people who is more motivated to exercise if I feel like I am doing something useful.
       
      I think you miss calculate the payback for the power generating exercise bikes at the health club.  A company who invests in equiptment with an 83 year payback period will not be in business very long.  The value that the power generating exercise bikes provide to the health club are advertising (from the free publicity), and primarily the membership dues from the people who come there and pay to ride them as well as the meger amount of power that they produce. 
       
      Happy Pedaling,
       
      Phillip
       
       
      -----Original Message-----
      From: boyer.chris@...
      To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sat, 3 Mar 2007 10:30 PM
      Subject: [hreg] Re:Pedal Power

      Pedal power has demonstrated itself as a great way to tap human energy.  It may not be a practical means for home power from an economic point of view; however, there could be other interests.  As a back-up power system - pedal power could operate a refrigerator, several LED or fluoresent lights, or a powerful communications system. 
       
      I'm going to make a pedal system that powers our television.  If the kids want to watch TV, they have to put in the excercise first.  (If anyone reading this knows my kids, please don't tell them yet. :)   I think it could be done with a used excercise bike from a garage sale ($25), a smal rebuilt alternator & voltage regulator ($50), a 12V marine battery ($100), and an inverter from Walmart ($30).   The electricity won't pay for the contraption, but having healthy kids who have learned to earn the things they enjoy will pay for it many times over.
       
      I encourage everyone with an idea to try it (safely).
       
       

      AOL now offers free email to everyone. Find out more about what's free from AOL at AOL.com.
    • paul_lamb
      After reading the comments on generating power with a bicycle setup, I did a Google search for pedal powered tv and got http://www.los-
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 5, 2007
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        After reading the comments on generating power with a bicycle setup, I
        did a Google search for 'pedal powered tv' and got http://www.los-
        gatos.ca.us/davidbu/pedgen.html
        It's a long article which is why I didn't paste it in here.
        Thanks to all who contribute to this site.
      • Kevin Conlin
        Phil, Actually I didn t calculate the payback, that is what was stated in the article. The systems were very expensive. Kevin ________________________ Kevin
        Message 3 of 9 , Mar 5, 2007
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          Phil,  Actually I didn’t calculate the payback, that is what was stated in the article.

           

          The systems were very expensive.

           

          Kevin

           

           

          ________________________

          Kevin Conlin

          Solarcraft, Inc.

          4007 C Greenbriar

          Stafford, TX 77477-4536

          Local (281) 340-1224

          Toll Free (877) 340-1224

          Fax 281 340 1230

          kconlin@...

          www.solarcraft.net

           

          Please make a note of our new contact information above.

           


          From: phil6142@... [mailto:phil6142@...]
          Sent: Sunday, March 04, 2007 9:19 PM
          To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [hreg] Re:Pedal Power

           

          I built a stand and connected to a bike similar to the one you mention building.  I got the bike for free because my brother was going to throw it away but other than that my costs were about what you mentioned.  Except that I also bought a something like a timing belt for a car (about $15 at autozone) to connect the alternator to the back tire of the bike.  I used steel to make the frame because I have a friend who runs a machine shop and could get most of the pieces for me free because they were scrap I did have to buy one longer piece which we cut up to make the base (about another $30) my friend also did the welding for free for me so if you don't know how to weld that will add some cost.  Though I don't see any reason why you can't build the frame out of 2x4's and nails. 

           

          My total cost was a little over $200 I think but that is cheaper than the exercise bike that my wife wanted to buy and that one would not produce any power.  The design that we used has a square base with a stand on the front to support the space where the front tire used to be the back of the support goes above the bike with a cross bar going over the back tire.  The alternator is bolted to the cross bar and the timing belt goes around the back tire and is supported by the alternator.  This also holds tension on the belt while the rider sits on it.  If you are interested in a picture send me an email and I will send you one as I am sure not everyone on the email list is interested in my little bike stand. 

           

          I am not sure what is the total power that we have produced from the bike but it is certainly less than the $200 that I spent on it.  But the bike has alot more value than simply the power it has produced.  Primarily the cost of buying a manufactured exercise bike for use in my home.  Additionally when Rita came through last year my neighborhood lost power for about 20 hours and during that time we had power to run the computer for internet connection and TV for news updates as well as a fan to keep us cool that night.  All thanks to the power generated by my little bicycle and that power was worth alot more than retail cost.  Plus I am one of those people who is more motivated to exercise if I feel like I am doing something useful.

           

          I think you miss calculate the payback for the power generating exercise bikes at the health club.  A company who invests in equiptment with an 83 year payback period will not be in business very long.  The value that the power generating exercise bikes provide to the health club are advertising (from the free publicity), and primarily the membership dues from the people who come there and pay to ride them as well as the meger amount of power that they produce. 

           

          Happy Pedaling,

           

          Phillip

           

           
          -----Original Message-----
          From: boyer.chris@ sbcglobal. net
          To: hreg@yahoogroups. com
          Sent: Sat, 3 Mar 2007 10:30 PM
          Subject: [hreg] Re:Pedal Power

          Pedal power has demonstrated itself as a great way to tap human energy.  It may not be a practical means for home power from an economic point of view; however, there could be other interests.  As a back-up power system - pedal power could operate a refrigerator, several LED or fluoresent lights, or a powerful communications system. 

           

          I'm going to make a pedal system that powers our television.  If the kids want to watch TV, they have to put in the excercise first.  (If anyone reading this knows my kids, please don't tell them yet. :)   I think it could be done with a used excercise bike from a garage sale ($25), a smal rebuilt alternator & voltage regulator ($50), a 12V marine battery ($100), and an inverter from Walmart ($30).   The electricity won't pay for the contraption, but having healthy kids who have learned to earn the things they enjoy will pay for it many times over.

           

          I encourage everyone with an idea to try it (safely).

           

           


          AOL now offers free email to everyone. Find out more about what's free from AOL at AOL.com.

        • Ariel Thomann
          1973: Soylent Green , 5-1/2 minutes into the film after the lion roars. Enjoy. Ariel - We are all Human beings here together. We have to help one another,
          Message 4 of 9 , Mar 5, 2007
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            1973: "Soylent Green", 5-1/2 minutes into the film after the lion roars. Enjoy.

            Ariel
            - We are all Human beings here together. We have to help one another, since
            otherwise there is NO ONE who will help.
            - All countries need a NO REGRETS strategic energy policy. Think ahead 7
            generations.
            ------------------------------------

            > Phil, Actually I didn't calculate the payback, that is what was stated in the
            > article.
            >
            >
            >
            > The systems were very expensive.
            >
            >
            >
            > Kevin
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > ________________________
            >
            > Kevin Conlin
            >
            > Solarcraft, Inc.
            >
            > 4007 C Greenbriar
            >
            > Stafford, TX 77477-4536
            >
            > Local (281) 340-1224
            >
            > Toll Free (877) 340-1224
            >
            > Fax 281 340 1230
            >
            > kconlin@...
            >
            > www.solarcraft.net <http://www.solarcraft.net/>
            >
            >
            >
            > Please make a note of our new contact information above.
            >
            >
            >
            > _____
            >
            > From: phil6142@... [mailto:phil6142@...]
            > Sent: Sunday, March 04, 2007 9:19 PM
            > To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: Re: [hreg] Re:Pedal Power
            >
            >
            >
            > I built a stand and connected to a bike similar to the one you mention
            > building. I got the bike for free because my brother was going to throw it
            > away but other than that my costs were about what you mentioned. Except that
            > I also bought a something like a timing belt for a car (about $15 at autozone)
            > to connect the alternator to the back tire of the bike. I used steel to make
            > the frame because I have a friend who runs a machine shop and could get most
            > of the pieces for me free because they were scrap I did have to buy one longer
            > piece which we cut up to make the base (about another $30) my friend also did
            > the welding for free for me so if you don't know how to weld that will add
            > some cost. Though I don't see any reason why you can't build the frame out of
            > 2x4's and nails.
            >
            >
            >
            > My total cost was a little over $200 I think but that is cheaper than the
            > exercise bike that my wife wanted to buy and that one would not produce any
            > power. The design that we used has a square base with a stand on the front to
            > support the space where the front tire used to be the back of the support goes
            > above the bike with a cross bar going over the back tire. The alternator is
            > bolted to the cross bar and the timing belt goes around the back tire and is
            > supported by the alternator. This also holds tension on the belt while the
            > rider sits on it. If you are interested in a picture send me an email and I
            > will send you one as I am sure not everyone on the email list is interested in
            > my little bike stand.
            >
            >
            >
            > I am not sure what is the total power that we have produced from the bike but
            > it is certainly less than the $200 that I spent on it. But the bike has alot
            > more value than simply the power it has produced. Primarily the cost of
            > buying a manufactured exercise bike for use in my home. Additionally when
            > Rita came through last year my neighborhood lost power for about 20 hours and
            > during that time we had power to run the computer for internet connection and
            > TV for news updates as well as a fan to keep us cool that night. All thanks
            > to the power generated by my little bicycle and that power was worth alot more
            > than retail cost. Plus I am one of those people who is more motivated to
            > exercise if I feel like I am doing something useful.
            >
            >
            >
            > I think you miss calculate the payback for the power generating exercise bikes
            > at the health club. A company who invests in equiptment with an 83 year
            > payback period will not be in business very long. The value that the power
            > generating exercise bikes provide to the health club are advertising (from the
            > free publicity), and primarily the membership dues from the people who come
            > there and pay to ride them as well as the meger amount of power that they
            > produce.
            >
            >
            >
            > Happy Pedaling,
            >
            >
            >
            > Phillip
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: boyer.chris@...
            > To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Sat, 3 Mar 2007 10:30 PM
            > Subject: [hreg] Re:Pedal Power
            >
            > Pedal power has demonstrated itself as a great way to tap human energy. It
            > may not be a practical means for home power from an economic point of view;
            > however, there could be other interests. As a back-up power system - pedal
            > power could operate a refrigerator, several LED or fluoresent lights, or a
            > powerful communications system.
            >
            >
            >
            > I'm going to make a pedal system that powers our television. If the kids want
            > to watch TV, they have to put in the excercise first. (If anyone reading this
            > knows my kids, please don't tell them yet. :) I think it could be done with
            > a used excercise bike from a garage sale ($25), a smal rebuilt alternator &
            > voltage regulator ($50), a 12V marine battery ($100), and an inverter from
            > Walmart ($30). The electricity won't pay for the contraption, but having
            > healthy kids who have learned to earn the things they enjoy will pay for it
            > many times over.
            >
            >
            >
            > I encourage everyone with an idea to try it (safely).
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > _____
            >
            > AOL now offers free email to everyone. Find out more about what's free from
            > AOL at
            > <http://pr.atwola.com/promoclk/1615326657x4311227241x4298082137/aol?redir=ht
            > tp://www.aol.com> AOL.com.
            >
            >
          • Russell Harrison
            Dear Phillip, I want to take you up on your offer, could you please send me a picture of the bike stand that you built, I would like to have a look. Thank you,
            Message 5 of 9 , Mar 6, 2007
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              Dear Phillip,

               

              I want to take you up on your offer, could you please send me a picture of the bike stand that you built, I would like to have a look.

               

              Thank you,

              Russell

               

               

              Russell Harrison

              Tank Service, Inc.

              Houston,TexasUSA

              www.TankService.com

              +1 (281) 542.5600 phone

              +1 (281) 542.7977 fax

               

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